Fitness and Weightloss



  • @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    6'5" and was 215 at Thanksgiving. After TG dinner I said I was going on a diet to get back down to the 185 I'm comfortable with. I got down to 175 by New Years. Just takes proper planning of meals to automate your groove; along with exercise, and no cheating.

    6'5" tall and you are complaining about being 215? You must have a small build for someone that tall. I was gifted with a linebacker type of build. I am 6'4" tall and I was 313 lbs. Most people tell me, you couldn't be that heavy, but I was. I have a long tall torso so hiding my true weight was easy, relatively normal length legs, 32" inseam on my pants.

    Hmm... yeah i read that again. 6'5" wanting to get down to 175 lbs? That's less than I am usualy, and I'm 5'10"ish. I thought I was pretty skinny... 6'5" and 215 seems like it'd be in the upper end of the healthy range... without looking at any charts off the top of my head.

    230 is a good target weight, but I just never had any success actually putting on some solid muscle, so I eventually gave up on all the weight gaining programs and weight lifting.

    Muscle building is a very slow process for everyone.... after the newbie gains anyway. If you are new or coming back to weight lifting and you stick to an intense workout routine for 4 or so months (as in great sleep, great eating, great workouts), you will see very noticeable muscle gains. But after the initial gains, you can't really expect to gain more than a kilo or two of solid muscle weight PER YEAR. It's a very slow process, and is something best done for the health benefits rather than trying to look big asap.

    The people you see walking around with big muscles have been doing it for years consistently, or have done (or are doing) steroids. Plain and simple. In about 10 years of consistent muscle workouts, as in 3-4 times a week, an hour each time, no more than a week's rest every couple months.

    For women it's a bit different. Many DON'T lift weights for fear of getting too much muscle. This is a myth. Women simply lack the testosterone required to "bulk up and look like a man" if you know what I mean. It's literally impossible (it's simple science), and those women who have, were taking steroids.

    A good weight lifting routine is always better than cardio. It burns more calories, promotes better health, and does a lot more for your body... such as shapign and toning

    This part I don't agree with. Strong (not large, but strong; they are not the same) arm/leg/chest/back muscles can spare me from a heart attack? Cardio and core strength promotes hip dyplasia deterrence, strong back muscles, blood flow, and heart health. I can't agree that lifting weights is better than cardio for a human body long term life, but I would agree that it has benefits for other reasons.

    This is the myth, and what I started out thinking as well. I'll link the science and studies tomorrow when I have time. Long story short, that there is a right way to lift, and doing so does for you everything you think straight cardio does.



  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    6'5" and was 215 at Thanksgiving. After TG dinner I said I was going on a diet to get back down to the 185 I'm comfortable with. I got down to 175 by New Years. Just takes proper planning of meals to automate your groove; along with exercise, and no cheating.

    6'5" tall and you are complaining about being 215? You must have a small build for someone that tall. I was gifted with a linebacker type of build. I am 6'4" tall and I was 313 lbs. Most people tell me, you couldn't be that heavy, but I was. I have a long tall torso so hiding my true weight was easy, relatively normal length legs, 32" inseam on my pants.

    Hmm... yeah i read that again. 6'5" wanting to get down to 175 lbs? That's less than I am usualy, and I'm 5'10"ish. I thought I was pretty skinny... 6'5" and 215 seems like it'd be in the upper end of the healthy range... without looking at any charts off the top of my head.

    230 is a good target weight, but I just never had any success actually putting on some solid muscle, so I eventually gave up on all the weight gaining programs and weight lifting.

    Muscle building is a very slow process for everyone.... after the newbie gains anyway. If you are new or coming back to weight lifting and you stick to an intense workout routine for 4 or so months (as in great sleep, great eating, great workouts), you will see very noticeable muscle gains. But after the initial gains, you can't really expect to gain more than a kilo or two of solid muscle weight PER YEAR. It's a very slow process, and is something best done for the health benefits rather than trying to look big asap.

    The people you see walking around with big muscles have been doing it for years consistently, or have done (or are doing) steroids. Plain and simple. In about 10 years of consistent muscle workouts, as in 3-4 times a week, an hour each time, no more than a week's rest every couple months.

    For women it's a bit different. Many DON'T lift weights for fear of getting too much muscle. This is a myth. Women simply lack the testosterone required to "bulk up and look like a man" if you know what I mean. It's literally impossible (it's simple science), and those women who have, were taking steroids.

    A good weight lifting routine is always better than cardio. It burns more calories, promotes better health, and does a lot more for your body... such as shapign and toning

    This part I don't agree with. Strong (not large, but strong; they are not the same) arm/leg/chest/back muscles can spare me from a heart attack? Cardio and core strength promotes hip dyplasia deterrence, strong back muscles, blood flow, and heart health. I can't agree that lifting weights is better than cardio for a human body long term life, but I would agree that it has benefits for other reasons.

    This is the myth, and what I started out thinking as well. I'll link the science and studies tomorrow when I have time. Long story short, that there is a right way to lift, and doing so does for you everything you think straight cardio does.

    Extreme heavy lifters, with proper breathing exercises, can run 12 miles on an average day? Outside of the weight they carry, their breathing is mild at the end of a 12 mile run with no slow down or break on mild inclind/decline at a relative pace?

    This is, of course, not focusing on the impact on their knees/back based on their body composition, and what that might look like long term. Just strictly focusing on cardio vs. lifting and how those might intertwine.



  • Scale said 199.8 this morning.. first time under 200 lbs in years.. awesome!



  • @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    6'5" and was 215 at Thanksgiving. After TG dinner I said I was going on a diet to get back down to the 185 I'm comfortable with. I got down to 175 by New Years. Just takes proper planning of meals to automate your groove; along with exercise, and no cheating.

    6'5" tall and you are complaining about being 215? You must have a small build for someone that tall. I was gifted with a linebacker type of build. I am 6'4" tall and I was 313 lbs. Most people tell me, you couldn't be that heavy, but I was. I have a long tall torso so hiding my true weight was easy, relatively normal length legs, 32" inseam on my pants.

    Hmm... yeah i read that again. 6'5" wanting to get down to 175 lbs? That's less than I am usualy, and I'm 5'10"ish. I thought I was pretty skinny... 6'5" and 215 seems like it'd be in the upper end of the healthy range... without looking at any charts off the top of my head.

    230 is a good target weight, but I just never had any success actually putting on some solid muscle, so I eventually gave up on all the weight gaining programs and weight lifting.

    Muscle building is a very slow process for everyone.... after the newbie gains anyway. If you are new or coming back to weight lifting and you stick to an intense workout routine for 4 or so months (as in great sleep, great eating, great workouts), you will see very noticeable muscle gains. But after the initial gains, you can't really expect to gain more than a kilo or two of solid muscle weight PER YEAR. It's a very slow process, and is something best done for the health benefits rather than trying to look big asap.

    The people you see walking around with big muscles have been doing it for years consistently, or have done (or are doing) steroids. Plain and simple. In about 10 years of consistent muscle workouts, as in 3-4 times a week, an hour each time, no more than a week's rest every couple months.

    For women it's a bit different. Many DON'T lift weights for fear of getting too much muscle. This is a myth. Women simply lack the testosterone required to "bulk up and look like a man" if you know what I mean. It's literally impossible (it's simple science), and those women who have, were taking steroids.

    A good weight lifting routine is always better than cardio. It burns more calories, promotes better health, and does a lot more for your body... such as shapign and toning

    This part I don't agree with. Strong (not large, but strong; they are not the same) arm/leg/chest/back muscles can spare me from a heart attack? Cardio and core strength promotes hip dyplasia deterrence, strong back muscles, blood flow, and heart health. I can't agree that lifting weights is better than cardio for a human body long term life, but I would agree that it has benefits for other reasons.

    This is the myth, and what I started out thinking as well. I'll link the science and studies tomorrow when I have time. Long story short, that there is a right way to lift, and doing so does for you everything you think straight cardio does.

    Extreme heavy lifters, with proper breathing exercises, can run 12 miles on an average day? Outside of the weight they carry, their breathing is mild at the end of a 12 mile run with no slow down or break on mild inclind/decline at a relative pace?

    This is, of course, not focusing on the impact on their knees/back based on their body composition, and what that might look like long term. Just strictly focusing on cardio vs. lifting and how those might intertwine.

    Extremes on either side are terrible... why bring those into the mix?

    Proper cardio vs proper weight lifting is what one aspect was about, not extremes.

    What I always recommend is that the best thing to do is a full strength training workout, followed by 5-15 minutes of medium to high intensity cardio.

    This is what I've put on my blog a while ago and have seen gives best results, with seeing science and studies backing it...

    The main takeaway here is that doing just one or the other, I would recommend strength training due to it having more benefits and preventing many old age problems.



  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @bbigford said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    6'5" and was 215 at Thanksgiving. After TG dinner I said I was going on a diet to get back down to the 185 I'm comfortable with. I got down to 175 by New Years. Just takes proper planning of meals to automate your groove; along with exercise, and no cheating.

    6'5" tall and you are complaining about being 215? You must have a small build for someone that tall. I was gifted with a linebacker type of build. I am 6'4" tall and I was 313 lbs. Most people tell me, you couldn't be that heavy, but I was. I have a long tall torso so hiding my true weight was easy, relatively normal length legs, 32" inseam on my pants.

    Hmm... yeah i read that again. 6'5" wanting to get down to 175 lbs? That's less than I am usualy, and I'm 5'10"ish. I thought I was pretty skinny... 6'5" and 215 seems like it'd be in the upper end of the healthy range... without looking at any charts off the top of my head.

    230 is a good target weight, but I just never had any success actually putting on some solid muscle, so I eventually gave up on all the weight gaining programs and weight lifting.

    Muscle building is a very slow process for everyone.... after the newbie gains anyway. If you are new or coming back to weight lifting and you stick to an intense workout routine for 4 or so months (as in great sleep, great eating, great workouts), you will see very noticeable muscle gains. But after the initial gains, you can't really expect to gain more than a kilo or two of solid muscle weight PER YEAR. It's a very slow process, and is something best done for the health benefits rather than trying to look big asap.

    The people you see walking around with big muscles have been doing it for years consistently, or have done (or are doing) steroids. Plain and simple. In about 10 years of consistent muscle workouts, as in 3-4 times a week, an hour each time, no more than a week's rest every couple months.

    For women it's a bit different. Many DON'T lift weights for fear of getting too much muscle. This is a myth. Women simply lack the testosterone required to "bulk up and look like a man" if you know what I mean. It's literally impossible (it's simple science), and those women who have, were taking steroids.

    A good weight lifting routine is always better than cardio. It burns more calories, promotes better health, and does a lot more for your body... such as shapign and toning

    This part I don't agree with. Strong (not large, but strong; they are not the same) arm/leg/chest/back muscles can spare me from a heart attack? Cardio and core strength promotes hip dyplasia deterrence, strong back muscles, blood flow, and heart health. I can't agree that lifting weights is better than cardio for a human body long term life, but I would agree that it has benefits for other reasons.

    This is the myth, and what I started out thinking as well. I'll link the science and studies tomorrow when I have time. Long story short, that there is a right way to lift, and doing so does for you everything you think straight cardio does.

    Extreme heavy lifters, with proper breathing exercises, can run 12 miles on an average day? Outside of the weight they carry, their breathing is mild at the end of a 12 mile run with no slow down or break on mild inclind/decline at a relative pace?

    This is, of course, not focusing on the impact on their knees/back based on their body composition, and what that might look like long term. Just strictly focusing on cardio vs. lifting and how those might intertwine.

    Extremes on either side are terrible... why bring those into the mix?

    I was using extreme examples because how I interpreted the content was "weight lifting can accommodate long distance running because heavy lifting can have certain cardio, vascular, and pulmonology benefits that can displace distance running or otherwise long term cardio activity". I was making an assumption that you were on a single side of weight lifting being able to displace a mix of running/hiking/etc.

    That is my fault for misinterpreting and not asking many more questions.


  • Service Provider

    0_1520089245319_8218A0DE-99AD-4D2E-BA2D-925CB437A47F.jpeg



  • Watch out for those natural flavors, they're tricking your brain!

    https://foodbabe.com/natural-flavors-really-bad-must-watch/



  • Roger Bannister, The 4 Minute Man has died.



  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Watch out for those natural flavors, they're tricking your brain!

    https://foodbabe.com/natural-flavors-really-bad-must-watch/

    Got any better sources for that story? Vani Hari is a fucking charlatan who uses her mindless minions to attack companies she doesn't like - when they decide to yield to the pressure, she gets an overpaid consulting gig with that company. Everything she writes or does is strictly motivated by money and extremely misguided, non-scientific opinions. To paraphrase the article below, she's the Dr. Oz of food. Taking her advice on anything is kinda like taking advice from Gwyneth Paltrow.

    https://respectfulinsolence.com/2015/03/17/vani-hari-a-k-a-the-food-babe-responds-to-the-new-york-times-ineptly-as-usual/



  • @rojoloco said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Got any better sources for that story?

    Is 'Natural Flavor' Healthier Than 'Artificial Flavor'?
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/03/560048780/is-natural-flavor-healthier-than-artificial-flavor

    Natural Flavors: Should You Eat Them?
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/natural-flavors

    The Dorito Effect: The Surprising New Truth About Food and Flavor
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1476724237

    What are natural flavors, really?
    https://www.cnn.com/2015/01/14/health/feat-natural-flavors-explained/index.html



  • Hearts Get 'Younger,' Even At Middle Age, With Exercise
    (Start now before it's too late. If you're under 70 years old, it will help a lot!)
    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/03/12/591513777/hearts-get-younger-even-at-middle-age-with-exercise?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180312



  • I am down 28 lbs . Should be hitting in the 270s next week. Just posted this in another thread but thought I would here too as it relates here. I have given up all forms of processed sugar. Sugar is so insidious and addictive. I already gave up most sugar, but I recently switched to standard creamer for my coffee and not the flavored sugar filled kind. That was one of the last spots of sugar for me. I am now completely sugar free. I am staying away from restaurants as well, at least as much as I can, and trying to order at restaurants very carefully.







  • @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.



  • @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.



  • Beets are pretty freaking awful... but cauliflower is definitely bottom 5.



  • @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.

    I'd rather have broccoli and sweet potatoes than cauliflower.



  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.

    I'd rather have broccoli and sweet potatoes than cauliflower.

    I love sweet potatoes - but still high in carbs.



  • @dashrender said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.

    I'd rather have broccoli and sweet potatoes than cauliflower.

    I love sweet potatoes - but still high in carbs.

    Not the same kind of carbs regular potatoes and white rice have. Sweet potato carbs are what you want.



  • I haven't dropped anymore weight (which is a good thing, I'm close to where I should be.) My blood pressure is down to 98/60 at rest now tho, yay.



  • Laura forced me into a doctors office expecting everything to be bad and I'm actually on the lower side of normal in everything. Eat it Laura



  • @wirestyle22 said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Laura forced me into a doctors office expecting everything to be bad and I'm actually on the lower side of normal in everything. Eat it Laura

    That usually means bad - being on the low end that is.

    Low blood pressure, low sugar levels, low cholesterol (good and bad)



  • @dustinb3403 said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @wirestyle22 said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Laura forced me into a doctors office expecting everything to be bad and I'm actually on the lower side of normal in everything. Eat it Laura

    That usually means bad - being on the low end that is.

    Low blood pressure, low sugar levels, low cholesterol (good and bad)

    Lower end of the normal range



  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.

    I'd rather have broccoli and sweet potatoes than cauliflower.

    I didn't say cauliflower was the best. It just is useful. My favorite veggie would have to be carrots, followed closely by turnip greens.

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @penguinwrangler said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @momurda said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @mlnews said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    https://www.tastecooking.com/caul-me-by-your-name/

    The worst vegetable in the world masquerading as rice.

    I disagree. I like Cauliflower as a substitute for other things, potatoes, rice etc. The worst vegetable in the world goes to beets, especially if they are pickled. However, I do like beet juice in my home juicer.

    I'd rather have broccoli and sweet potatoes than cauliflower.

    I didn't say cauliflower was the best veggie just useful. I like carrots the best followed closely by turnip greens.



  • Just my 2 cents, but we need to be clear when we define what we are trying to say when we talk about health on this thread. Health and nutrition is very complicated and there is no best practice defined, it isn't like IT. I think for arguments sake we need to say if our goal in a suggestion is to loose weight, build muscle, run for distance, live longer, or what. As a culture especially in the US we see marathon runners and weight lifters and think, now that is healthy, but the reality is the runners and weight lifters who preform at the top level, die really young. Even if we post the magical formula of what is "healthy", it doesn't work for everyone. Some people at a genetic level do not thrive on the same diet and habits as another human. So be careful when talking about what is "best" for "health" and be clear what your goals are in making any change to your routine. Lastly, there are some things that are agreed upon. Being obese is bad, and it will kill you, so eat a little better, and try to maintain a decently healthy lifestyle. and let's not get stuck in the weeds about what is the best way to do it.



  • @s-hackleman said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Just my 2 cents, but we need to be clear when we define what we are trying to say when we talk about health on this thread. Health and nutrition is very complicated and there is no best practice defined, it isn't like IT. I think for arguments sake we need to say if our goal in a suggestion is to loose weight, build muscle, run for distance, live longer, or what. As a culture especially in the US we see marathon runners and weight lifters and think, now that is healthy, but the reality is the runners and weight lifters who preform at the top level, die really young. Even if we post the magical formula of what is "healthy", it doesn't work for everyone. Some people at a genetic level do not thrive on the same diet and habits as another human. So be careful when talking about what is "best" for "health" and be clear what your goals are in making any change to your routine. Lastly, there are some things that are agreed upon. Being obese is bad, and it will kill you, so eat a little better, and try to maintain a decently healthy lifestyle. and let's not get stuck in the weeds about what is the best way to do it.

    I'm always speaking in the context of better health overall, which is a good balance of everything, where the below IS a best practice (to your best ability):

    • Diet
      • Avoid processed foods and drinks
      • Avoid added sugars
      • Avoid bad carbs (breads, potato, white rice, pastries, cereals, etc)
      • Go for unprocessed, more natural foods: (natually a more healthy choice by default)
        • walnuts, pecans, peanuts, etc.
        • peas, broccoli, spinach, etc.
        • avocado, sweet potato / yam, whole oats, etc.
        • tuna, salmon, turkey, black beans, etc.
        • banana, dates, berries, etc.
    • Sleep
      • 8.5 hours "in bed"
      • 7-8 hours of actual sleeping
        • if this is difficult, try "sleep compression"
    • Exercise
      • Strength Training (muscle, bone, heart, lung health)
      • Cardio (heart and lung health)


  • @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @s-hackleman said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Just my 2 cents, but we need to be clear when we define what we are trying to say when we talk about health on this thread. Health and nutrition is very complicated and there is no best practice defined, it isn't like IT. I think for arguments sake we need to say if our goal in a suggestion is to loose weight, build muscle, run for distance, live longer, or what. As a culture especially in the US we see marathon runners and weight lifters and think, now that is healthy, but the reality is the runners and weight lifters who preform at the top level, die really young. Even if we post the magical formula of what is "healthy", it doesn't work for everyone. Some people at a genetic level do not thrive on the same diet and habits as another human. So be careful when talking about what is "best" for "health" and be clear what your goals are in making any change to your routine. Lastly, there are some things that are agreed upon. Being obese is bad, and it will kill you, so eat a little better, and try to maintain a decently healthy lifestyle. and let's not get stuck in the weeds about what is the best way to do it.

    I'm always speaking in the context of better health overall, which is a good balance of everything, where the below IS a best practice (to your best ability):

    • Diet
      • Avoid processed foods and drinks
      • Avoid added sugars
      • Avoid bad carbs (breads, potato, white rice, pastries, cereals, etc)
      • Go for unprocessed, more natural foods: (natually a more healthy choice by default)
        • walnuts, pecans, peanuts, etc.
        • peas, broccoli, spinach, etc.
        • avocado, sweet potato / yam, whole oats, etc.
        • tuna, salmon, turkey, black beans, etc.
        • banana, dates, berries, etc.
    • Sleep
      • 8.5 hours "in bed"
      • 7-8 hours of actual sleeping
        • if this is difficult, try "sleep compression"
    • Exercise
      • Strength Training (muscle, bone, heart, lung health)
      • Cardio (heart and lung health)

    Well… for diet, you miss the first and most important point, the energy balance. You have to eat the right amount of calories per day, that’s the foundamental point. You can get this amount eating junk food or good stuff, but they are still calories.



  • I dont get how white rice is considered bad. 4 billion people eat it as their main source of food every day. None has type 2 diabetes or is obese.



  • @francesco-provino said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @tim_g said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    @s-hackleman said in Fitness and Weightloss:

    Just my 2 cents, but we need to be clear when we define what we are trying to say when we talk about health on this thread. Health and nutrition is very complicated and there is no best practice defined, it isn't like IT. I think for arguments sake we need to say if our goal in a suggestion is to loose weight, build muscle, run for distance, live longer, or what. As a culture especially in the US we see marathon runners and weight lifters and think, now that is healthy, but the reality is the runners and weight lifters who preform at the top level, die really young. Even if we post the magical formula of what is "healthy", it doesn't work for everyone. Some people at a genetic level do not thrive on the same diet and habits as another human. So be careful when talking about what is "best" for "health" and be clear what your goals are in making any change to your routine. Lastly, there are some things that are agreed upon. Being obese is bad, and it will kill you, so eat a little better, and try to maintain a decently healthy lifestyle. and let's not get stuck in the weeds about what is the best way to do it.

    I'm always speaking in the context of better health overall, which is a good balance of everything, where the below IS a best practice (to your best ability):

    • Diet
      • Avoid processed foods and drinks
      • Avoid added sugars
      • Avoid bad carbs (breads, potato, white rice, pastries, cereals, etc)
      • Go for unprocessed, more natural foods: (natually a more healthy choice by default)
        • walnuts, pecans, peanuts, etc.
        • peas, broccoli, spinach, etc.
        • avocado, sweet potato / yam, whole oats, etc.
        • tuna, salmon, turkey, black beans, etc.
        • banana, dates, berries, etc.
    • Sleep
      • 8.5 hours "in bed"
      • 7-8 hours of actual sleeping
        • if this is difficult, try "sleep compression"
    • Exercise
      • Strength Training (muscle, bone, heart, lung health)
      • Cardio (heart and lung health)

    Well… for diet, you miss the first and most important point, the energy balance. You have to eat the right amount of calories per day, that’s the foundamental point. You can get this amount eating junk food or good stuff, but they are still calories.

    Yes calories are important for maintaining a healthy weight, but more importantly for overall health, it's what you eat.

    Eating 3000 calories of sugar will be much worse for your body and health than eating 3000 calories of avocado and walnuts.