Expectations of Employee Attendance



  • For those managers here, what are your attendance expectations for employees? We all know there may be times employees have to put in extra hours to finish something or put out a major fire, and in such times it's fair to give some grace on the following day's start time (or maybe even give a full / partial day off). But overall, how strict are you about employees being on time to work? And are the rules different for those who work harder for you and put in the extra effort (i.e. volunteer to work some extra hours here and there when needed)? Does management agree with your rules?

    I'd love to hear any feedback folks here might have.



  • For us here it is so hard to really stand on any of that.... We all work from home that means well we have a lot of freedom. I don't care if someone is late they just have to be available by cell phone at least.



  • Of course that also means my team tends to work more than they are scheduled for cause well we tend to not leave our desks very often :P



  • At my last job, we had a little bit of leeway -- at least the salaried folks did. If I worked until 7 or 8pm at night, I could come in at 9 or 10 the next morning or take a long lunch the next day.

    At my current job, they're not clock-watchers. A couple of minutes working over (or being late to your desk) doesn't seem like a big deal as long as things are getting done.



  • My situation is similar to dafyre's, as long as the work is getting done, my salaried position isn't watched that close.

    It's not uncommon to see me in the office until 6 PM (quitin' time is 5).



  • I strolled in late every day this week, my boss don't give a f[moderated]. Well, that's more of a function of that my boss was at VMworld.

    I've found that the higher up in the chain of support I go, the more lax it becomes for punching in a clock. When I was a lowly first level phone goon taking calls for Time Warner Cable, it was punctual to a fault. When I worked as a level 2 support goon for AT&T, it was punctual, but very flexible. When I became a system admin and started to run my own show, punctuality was not needed as much except for very specific reasons. When I went to the big red V, as a Level 1, I needed to be on time more often but they didn't care. When I moved up to Level 2, I was less and less required to be "on time" because my scope of work was by its nature dynamic. Now at my new job I am allowed to pretty much call my hours as the only Windows L3 guy I can justify my Spirit Airlines level of on-time response.


  • Banned

    I'm salaried, so It's got a bit of leeway but we are mostly expected to work at least our 8a-5p regardless but, sometimes there is some flexibility. It's not unusual for me to be as late a 8pm here or as early as 4am. Then of course there's plenty of weekend/night work to keep server patches up and such.


  • Service Provider

    We have one client that likes a person on site twice a week. we set a scheduled of Tue and Fri from 1-5. As long as the person I have assigned that task shows or call the point of contact if they are going to be outside that frame, we have no fixed attendance policy as we work form home.

    Personally I never start working until around 9am or so. I stop around 4pm with time out for lunch in the middle at some point. Then I work a few hours in the evenings normally.


  • cid:7:privileges:read

    It depends on the job. If you have to support end users, you need to be at the office when they are, that is usually a scheduling task. But for engineers, administrators, etc... I don't care, nor do I pay attention. If I have to micro manage that, then I'm in the wrong job and I hired the wrong person.


  • Service Provider

    I can't really remember having a job where I even had a "time" for work. Except for schedules with meetings or customer sites that needed to coordinate unlocking doors or whatever, I don't think that I've ever had an IT job that prescribed hours in any way. You do your work when you can do your work.



  • @Bob-Beatty said:

    It depends on the job. If you have to support end users, you need to be at the office when they are, that is usually a scheduling task. But for engineers, administrators, etc... I don't care, nor do I pay attention. If I have to micro manage that, then I'm in the wrong job and I hired the wrong person.

    In this case it was end user support. The part about hiring the wrong person is what turned out to be true in my case, but we've resolved that problem now. Thanks everyone for your advice on this one.


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