My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story





  • This story is nothing like I imagined it.

    First things first - you weren't a noob approaching someone to offer free services, you were part of a for profit ITSP. You had a ton of experience and resources behind you when you started this venture.

    Do you have any stories about something similar when you were green?



  • @dashrender said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    This story is nothing like I imagined it.

    First things first - you weren't a noob approaching someone to offer free services, you were part of a for profit ITSP. You had a ton of experience and resources behind you when you started this venture.

    Do you have any stories about something similar when you were green?

    For me to have been a noob, I would have to have been quite young. Remember I started in Fortune 100 software engineering (as an intern) when I was 13.



  • @dashrender said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Do you have any stories about something similar when you were green?

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.
    Age 9: Learned to program
    Age 13: Interned for a Fortune 100 doing database development (actually building database servers.)
    Age 14: Took MIT classes on programming.
    Age 17: Offered first international relocation for an enterprise (to Canada.)
    Age 18: Took first academic job in both IT and SE (UNIX admin and assistant teacher for Fortran and C and manager for Pascal teaching.)
    Age 19: First work in computer aided manufacturing systems and first bench work.

    At which point would I have been green enough?



  • This is pretty cool, I actually started IT while in High School and it was pretty similar to the fact there wasn't that much technology at the time in our school.



  • @scottalanmiller

    Very interesting video. I see such corruption all over the place too. Not just non-profit, but charities too... it is such a shame.

    I know one charity where a member on the board of directors for the charity also owns an MSP. That board use his MSP as the 'IT Company' for the charity. The board will never change that, and yes, his MSP charges far more for work at the charity than to normal business. As he is 'in power', it wont change - and the work they do is usually below standard.



  • @jimmy9008 said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Very interesting video. I see such corruption all over the place too. Not just non-profit, but charities too... it is such a shame.

    US terminology... non-profits and charities are the same (legally, anyway.)



  • @jimmy9008 said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    I know one charity where a member on the board of directors for the charity also owns an MSP. That board use his MSP as the 'IT Company' for the charity. The board will never change that, and yes, his MSP charges far more for work at the charity than to normal business. As he is 'in power', it wont change - and the work they do is usually below standard.

    Yup, directly, outright theft of donations. Super common. I've seen that exact scenario many times.



  • @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.

    When you make claims like this, you have to follow them up with
    "Stay thirsty, my friends"



  • @brrabill said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.

    When you make claims like this, you have to follow them up with
    "Stay thirsty, my friends"

    My daughter is 5. I have recent knowledge of how 3 year olds are. There's no way you even knew what software engineering was. I think at 3 my daughter decided she wanted to go to the stars in a space ship (astronaut technically).... but I wouldn't list that as a competent career decision like you are doing. Really?



  • @tim_g said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @brrabill said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.

    When you make claims like this, you have to follow them up with
    "Stay thirsty, my friends"

    My daughter is 5. I have recent knowledge of how 3 year olds are. There's no way you even knew what software engineering was. I think at 3 my daughter decided she wanted to go to the stars in a space ship (astronaut technically).... but I wouldn't list that as a competent career decision like you are doing. Really?

    Perhaps you were one of those few wonder kids doing advanced algebra at 4, graduating Harvard at 8. If so, then I take it back. But I haven't seen you mention that.



  • Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.
    Age 3, 1 Days: Drank entire tub of glue
    Age 3, 31 Days: Pooped on the floor



  • Sounds like a pretty awesome project! I would love to be involved in a project like that.



  • @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @dashrender said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Do you have any stories about something similar when you were green?

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.
    Age 9: Learned to program
    Age 13: Interned for a Fortune 100 doing database development (actually building database servers.)
    Age 14: Took MIT classes on programming.
    Age 17: Offered first international relocation for an enterprise (to Canada.)
    Age 18: Took first academic job in both IT and SE (UNIX admin and assistant teacher for Fortran and C and manager for Pascal teaching.)
    Age 19: First work in computer aided manufacturing systems and first bench work.

    At which point would I have been green enough?

    Couldn't help myself.

    Age 10ish - 17: Full-speed ahead becoming a musician.
    Age 17: Develop interest in "computers" to complement my interest in medicine and the musical skills. Began teaching saxophone lessons.
    Age 20: Considered changing majors at UGA to Management Information Systems from Music Education.
    Age 23: Began career as a public school teacher.
    Age 30: Decided to go to school to get some technical skills for changing careers out of public school teaching (technical college).
    Age 31: Land first IT / Bench job.
    Age 34: Discover MangoLassi and start to have eyes opened as to what IT is and is supposed to be.
    Age 35: Present.
    </thread hijack>



  • @eddiejennings said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @dashrender said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Do you have any stories about something similar when you were green?

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.
    Age 9: Learned to program
    Age 13: Interned for a Fortune 100 doing database development (actually building database servers.)
    Age 14: Took MIT classes on programming.
    Age 17: Offered first international relocation for an enterprise (to Canada.)
    Age 18: Took first academic job in both IT and SE (UNIX admin and assistant teacher for Fortran and C and manager for Pascal teaching.)
    Age 19: First work in computer aided manufacturing systems and first bench work.

    At which point would I have been green enough?

    Couldn't help myself.

    Age 10ish - 17: Full-speed ahead becoming a musician.
    Age 17: Develop interest in "computers" to complement my interest in medicine and the musical skills. Began teaching saxophone lessons.
    Age 20: Considered changing majors at UGA to Management Information Systems from Music Education.
    Age 23: Began career as a public school teacher.
    Age 30: Decided to go to school to get some technical skills for changing careers out of public school teaching (technical college).
    Age 31: Land first IT / Bench job.
    Age 34: Discover MangoLassi and start to have eyes opened as to what IT is and is supposed to be.
    Age 35: Present.
    </thread hijack>

    0_1504192173524_Threadjack.jpg
    😛



  • @tim_g said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @brrabill said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.

    When you make claims like this, you have to follow them up with
    "Stay thirsty, my friends"

    My daughter is 5. I have recent knowledge of how 3 year olds are. There's no way you even knew what software engineering was. I think at 3 my daughter decided she wanted to go to the stars in a space ship (astronaut technically).... but I wouldn't list that as a competent career decision like you are doing. Really?

    That's when I decided that I wanted to automate systems like my dad.

    About the same age my daughers both decided that they wanted to be bakers. Nothing weird about finding a career and sticking with it. How many firemen or astronauts didn't want to do those things at that age?



  • @tim_g said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @tim_g said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @brrabill said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    @scottalanmiller said in My K12 Non-Profit Volunteer Story:

    Age 3: Decided to go into software engineering as a career.

    When you make claims like this, you have to follow them up with
    "Stay thirsty, my friends"

    My daughter is 5. I have recent knowledge of how 3 year olds are. There's no way you even knew what software engineering was. I think at 3 my daughter decided she wanted to go to the stars in a space ship (astronaut technically).... but I wouldn't list that as a competent career decision like you are doing. Really?

    Perhaps you were one of those few wonder kids doing advanced algebra at 4, graduating Harvard at 8. If so, then I take it back. But I haven't seen you mention that.

    How do those things relate to making life decisions? Those are not the same kinds of things.


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