How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V



  • Thumbing through Veaam documentation and thinking through how Veeam would work using USB hard drives that are rotated.

    From what I've read, I'd have an instance of Windows Server running the backup software, and I'd have some client machine with the backup console installed. Let say I wanted to use a USB hard drive as a repository, and wanted to rotate a few copies -- which is what we do ( / has always been done) at work. We have three drives that rotate weekly.

    If I'm in a hyper-V environment, the server running Veeam will be a VM itself. So in order for USB drives to work, I imagine the way to do this would be created a VHDX on each USB hard disk, attach the VHDX to the VM, and simply use the disk that's presented when going through Veeam's wizard for creating a repository.


  • Service Provider

    @EddieJennings said in What Are You Doing Right Now:

    Thumbing through Veaam documentation and thinking through how Veeam would work using USB hard drives that are rotated.

    From what I've read, I'd have an instance of Windows Server running the backup software, and I'd have some client machine with the backup console installed. Let say I wanted to use a USB hard drive as a repository, and wanted to rotate a few copies -- which is what we do ( / has always been done) at work. We have three drives that rotate weekly.

    If I'm in a hyper-V environment, the server running Veeam will be a VM itself. So in order for USB drives to work, I imagine the way to do this would be created a VHDX on each USB hard disk, attach the VHDX to the VM, and simply use the disk that's presented when going through Veeam's wizard for creating a repository.

    That would theoretically work. More commonly you'd likely use a USB passthrough. This isn't a common task as USB drive rotation is manual and not generally a business process for backups.



  • @scottalanmiller said in What Are You Doing Right Now:

    @EddieJennings said in What Are You Doing Right Now:

    Thumbing through Veaam documentation and thinking through how Veeam would work using USB hard drives that are rotated.

    From what I've read, I'd have an instance of Windows Server running the backup software, and I'd have some client machine with the backup console installed. Let say I wanted to use a USB hard drive as a repository, and wanted to rotate a few copies -- which is what we do ( / has always been done) at work. We have three drives that rotate weekly.

    If I'm in a hyper-V environment, the server running Veeam will be a VM itself. So in order for USB drives to work, I imagine the way to do this would be created a VHDX on each USB hard disk, attach the VHDX to the VM, and simply use the disk that's presented when going through Veeam's wizard for creating a repository.

    That would theoretically work. More commonly you'd likely use a USB passthrough. This isn't a common task as USB drive rotation is manual and not generally a business process for backups.

    My first thought was pass-through, but I know pass-through disks are generally avoided if there is a better way. What would be a "business process" for backups? I'm limited to the experience of what I've learned in my environment. I imagine businesses with good backup solutions would rotate media and have something off site.


  • Service Provider

    @EddieJennings said in What Are You Doing Right Now:

    My first thought was pass-through, but I know pass-through disks are generally avoided if there is a better way.

    In the same vein, USB disks are avoided, too. You are already breaking the "generally avoided" rule to get into this scenario. So you have to then do something further that is normally avoided one way or another to get things to work.


  • Service Provider

    Don"t use USB disks.

    If you want a USB disk that can be removed, use a NAS with a USB port that can replicate data in a certain folder to the USB.


  • Service Provider

    @JaredBusch said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    Don"t use USB disks.

    If you want a USB disk that can be removed, use a NAS with a USB port that can replicate data in a certain folder to the USB.

    Or use a NAS with Starwind VTL so that you get the behaviour of tapes. And the protection of RAID.



  • @scottalanmiller said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    @JaredBusch said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    Don"t use USB disks.

    If you want a USB disk that can be removed, use a NAS with a USB port that can replicate data in a certain folder to the USB.

    Or use a NAS with Starwind VTL so that you get the behaviour of tapes. And the protection of RAID.

    I'm going to have to look at that


  • Service Provider

    @Dashrender said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    @scottalanmiller said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    @JaredBusch said in How Do You Use USB HD for Veeam on Hyper-V:

    Don"t use USB disks.

    If you want a USB disk that can be removed, use a NAS with a USB port that can replicate data in a certain folder to the USB.

    Or use a NAS with Starwind VTL so that you get the behaviour of tapes. And the protection of RAID.

    I'm going to have to look at that

    It's a cool product.



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