how your IT department approach a request?



  • how your IT Department approach a request?

    when the boss request for a computer for a department, does it mean you need to install all possible requirements attach to it. Like printers, credit card machine, all possible computer related that you can think of that link to that "computer request'? or you only install what is specifically requested to install?

    I feel if the boss who is fault finder, you most likely always fall short as the request is not specific and there's plenty of room to find a fault.

    what do you think?

    i feel the detailed IT request form should cover my ass instead of allowing the approach above.


  • Banned

    @nvila said

    i feel the detailed IT request form should cover my ass instead of allowing the approach above.

    If covering the ass and avoiding mistakes if the goal, you are in the wrong industry.

    It is entirely your job to interpret or understand the wishes of your client, whether as an in house staff member working for a company or not, you must understand the task and what you have been asked to do.

    So if you are unsure of the needs, you go back to the "Client" and find out what those needs are. If you are part of a culture which does the blame game, well that's a sign of a bigger problem.



  • someone warned me before that the culture here is watching someone to fail. blame game is rampant as well. how to protect your self on this kind of practices



  • @nvila said in how your IT department approach a request?:

    someone warned me before that the culture here is watching someone to fail. blame game is rampant as well. how to protect your self on this kind of practices

    To completely protect yourself and have no issues in the future - find a new job!

    I wish there was a solution to this. It sucks a lot.

    Try and be the best example you can for others, but watch your back because that's a toxic environment.



  • You ask for specifics to what the user will need, and update the ticket to reflect what was specifically required.

    Now, CYA isn't a bad thing, as some managers are just out to place blame to make themselves look more important or doing their jobs.

    There is nothing you can do about it besides find another job.


  • Banned

    @nvila said in how your IT department approach a request?:

    someone warned me before that the culture here is watching someone to fail. blame game is rampant as well. how to protect your self on this kind of practices

    Think of jobs as different swimming pools, some are full of toxic waste and others are nice and clear.

    Get of the toxic pool, find a new pool to swim in.



  • Time to work with your boss on these kinds of questions - if there is a standard for new equipment orders that he would like to see implemented?



  • @nvila said in how your IT department approach a request?:

    someone warned me before that the culture here is watching someone to fail. blame game is rampant as well. how to protect your self on this kind of practices

    That's not healthy. Not only not for you, but it means that the company is not healthy.



  • @Breffni-Potter said in how your IT department approach a request?:

    So if you are unsure of the needs, you go back to the "Client" and find out what those needs are. If you are part of a culture which does the blame game, well that's a sign of a bigger problem.

    This... and make sure you get it in writing and make sure that information is recorded on the ticket that you have for this new computer as well.



  • Do you mean your boss or the boss of the department making the request? Either way, clarifying via e-mail should be sufficient to CYA, shouldn't it? "Hey boss, do you want a printer with that?"

    Employees at our place are given spending limits. So if you have a $500 spending limit, you can spent it without getting in to trouble - because we're trusting you not to screw up small purchases. If you're spending limit is $2000, we're trusting you a bit more. So no-one should get blamed for anything. My spending limit is actually pretty small, and that's the way I like it. I effectively order what I want, but the purchase orders always have my bosses signature on them, not mine.



  • Here, we have worked out a default setup for each department. If the department head makes a request for a new machine, they are reminded what the default setup for their department is, and if they would like anything different, they need to specify it.

    I'm also lucky. The execs here just demand everyone to place detailed request. If someone doesn't get what they wanted, they weren't specific enough.



  • @jyates that is how it should be.

    Ok you are in this position, which gets XY and Z for network access and equipment.

    If they need something else, then the direct manager needs to specify it.



  • We have default template for each department. If they want something different, they have to specified in details, then we will return with how much more it will cost, and Pros Cons from IT perspective.

    Every once in a while we will get a special request like New Machine that that support 3 monitors setup. We will then return with more questions like 'what kind of monitors?' 'do we have these monitors already or do we need to purchase them as well?' 'For what purpose?' We need these information to determine if we need high end graphic card or basic ones will do.

    If they failed to provide suffice information, we will give them 2 weeks before dropping the request. Obviously, all communications are through emails. Anything not in email communication means it never happens.


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