Github for code storage



  • It seems like some of you are using github for code storage. I am starting write more and more code as of late and would like a better way to organize it in the cloud.

    What solution are your using? and if you are using github, how are you organizing it?



  • Github / Gitlab are all fine options.

    Organize your code by the project its for. Or "make projects" for your code. This way it's this code for XYZ.



  • I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames? Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames?

    You could of course use a paid account with Github and have private repositories. These cost money obviously.

    Gitlab offers private repo's as well at no cost, but other limits. So you don't have to remove such details.

    @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?

    Not sure what you mean by this in particular. .



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    It seems like some of you are using github for code storage. I am starting write more and more code as of late and would like a better way to organize it in the cloud.

    What solution are your using? and if you are using github, how are you organizing it?

    I use hosted GitLab. It's free for private repos. Plus the runners are free as well if you host them. It's an awesome service.



  • The biggest limits on GitLab are large organization things like burndown charts and Epic creation for kanban. A lot of stuff like that.



  • We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org



  • I'm on Gitlab as well... Make everything related its own Git Repo... or combine them where they make sense...

    Use Find & Replace in File to clear out private details like IP addresses/hostnames & Passwords.



  • @Skyetel said in Github for code storage:

    We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org

    I like Atlassian stuff. I am checking this one out as there does not appear to be many limitations for free



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    @Skyetel said in Github for code storage:

    We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org

    I like Atlassian stuff. I am checking this one out as there does not appear to be many limitations for free

    57054bd8-bde4-44ca-892d-8df00ffbbd5e-image.png



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    @Skyetel said in Github for code storage:

    We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org

    I like Atlassian stuff. I am checking this one out as there does not appear to be many limitations for free

    Not pushing one or the other but I don't think you would ever see any of the limitations in GitLab. Last I looked I think BitBucket has a limitation of 5 private repos for the free tier. It could have changed though. Or maybe it was 5 users with access to it.



  • I'm definitely not the expert on repos - but I know that our development team is madly in love with Bitbucket's code pipelines. https://bitbucket.org/product/features/pipelines

    Please don't ask me many more questions about it 😛

    It also integrates beautifully with Slack which I love 🙂



  • @Skyetel said in Github for code storage:

    We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org

    I dislike them. I find them slow and lacking features compared to Gitlab and Github.



  • @stacksofplates said in Github for code storage:

    @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    @Skyetel said in Github for code storage:

    We use Bitbucket and love it. http://bitbucket.org

    I like Atlassian stuff. I am checking this one out as there does not appear to be many limitations for free

    Not pushing one or the other but I don't think you would ever see any of the limitations in GitLab. Last I looked I think BitBucket has a limitation of 5 private repos for the free tier. It could have changed though. Or maybe it was 5 users with access to it.

    It is 5 users.



  • Github also has unlimited free repos since January.

    a48e0553-5136-4f18-84ee-56a283b90ded-image.png



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames? Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?

    You have to handle this outside of any public repo. Because the entire point of a repo is making all of the commit history available.

    What I do is make a copy of whatever script I want to publish and then redact things.

    I've let things slip before and had to nuke an entire project to remove any history.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Github for code storage:

    You could of course use a paid account with Github and have private repositories

    I think this changed a while back so that you can create private repos on GH using a free account.



  • @Danp said in Github for code storage:

    @DustinB3403 said in Github for code storage:

    You could of course use a paid account with Github and have private repositories

    I think this changed a while back so that you can create private repos on GH using a free account.

    January 2019, after Microsoft purchased them.



  • @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames? Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?

    First, try to write code that doesn't need scrubbing. Create functions that take parameters you define either interactively or that you can set manually in an easy and quick way.

    If you can't and just have to hardcode in private data, both GitHub and GitLab allow private repos. I use both just the same now.



  • @JaredBusch said in Github for code storage:

    @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames? Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?

    You have to handle this outside of any public repo. Because the entire point of a repo is making all of the commit history available.

    What I do is make a copy of whatever script I want to publish and then redact things.

    I've let things slip before and had to nuke an entire project to remove any history.

    GitLab has a nice feature to block secrets. I haven't personally used it yet but they've been touting it in the new release.



  • @Obsolesce said in Github for code storage:

    @IRJ said in Github for code storage:

    I guess another question would also be how do you handle scrubbing of identifying data such as IPs , emails, or hostnames? Can your privately highlight any fields that should be changed?

    First, try to write code that doesn't need scrubbing. Create functions that take parameters you define either interactively or that you can set manually in an easy and quick way.

    If you can't and just have to hardcode in private data, both GitHub and GitLab allow private repos. I use both just the same now.

    Except he wants to make them public for others to use also.

    But still good advice to try and break things out to parameters and functions.



  • @JaredBusch said in Github for code storage:

    @Danp said in Github for code storage:

    @DustinB3403 said in Github for code storage:

    You could of course use a paid account with Github and have private repositories

    I think this changed a while back so that you can create private repos on GH using a free account.

    January 2019, after Microsoft purchased them.

    I'm late both to the post and the update, but this is the first I read about this, and am now very, very excited.

    I've been using Bitbucket for private repos, and I didn't run into any issues with them, but man I scoured a year ago trying to find the best alternatives because I didn't want to pay for Github. This is awesome.



  • @FiyaFly said in Github for code storage:

    I've been using Bitbucket for private repos, and I didn't run into any issues with them, but man I scoured a year ago trying to find the best alternatives because I didn't want to pay for Github. This is awesome.

    Why not GitLab which has always been free, and is totally open source?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Github for code storage:

    @FiyaFly said in Github for code storage:

    I've been using Bitbucket for private repos, and I didn't run into any issues with them, but man I scoured a year ago trying to find the best alternatives because I didn't want to pay for Github. This is awesome.

    Why not GitLab which has always been free, and is totally open source?

    It was long enough ago that I would have to review my notes, but I think it had to do with data encryption, and at the time I saw BitBucket had a plugin for that.

    If memory serves, that plugin actually didn't work, and I never had the time nor energy to go on another hunt. Was attempting to adhere to data encryption standards here at work because some of my stuff might have identifiable information in it.



  • @FiyaFly said in Github for code storage:

    @scottalanmiller said in Github for code storage:

    @FiyaFly said in Github for code storage:

    I've been using Bitbucket for private repos, and I didn't run into any issues with them, but man I scoured a year ago trying to find the best alternatives because I didn't want to pay for Github. This is awesome.

    Why not GitLab which has always been free, and is totally open source?

    It was long enough ago that I would have to review my notes, but I think it had to do with data encryption, and at the time I saw BitBucket had a plugin for that.

    If memory serves, that plugin actually didn't work, and I never had the time nor energy to go on another hunt. Was attempting to adhere to data encryption standards here at work because some of my stuff might have identifiable information in it.

    Also a lot of things have changed since then, and even with this new advent, I'll still have to review where things stand with requirements, desires, and focus.

    Currently I mostly use the private repo for my notes storage on my general tasks. Originally it was a factor of I was just getting into using Git for anything and wanted to ensure I had a backup of my notes somewhere. This was not something
    my employer would participate in, and almost certainly my boss would have rejected my request for approval, mostly for arbitrary reasons. Since I certainly have 'sensitive' information in my notes, I wanted to ensure that I stayed properly aligned with any and all compliances that may have applied.

    Since then... those aren't details to get into on a post, but suffice it to say I have the most care for those compliances in my department.


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