Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer



  • @mary said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    I'm a bit confused. He mentioned virtual servers, but what kind of hardware is used to house them?

    Pretty much "any" its not special hardware.



  • @scottalanmiller so cloud is a buzzword?



  • @mary said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @scottalanmiller so cloud is a buzzword?

    Cloud is "the" buzzword.

    But thats separate. Cloud is a very real thing. Just not a thing requiring special hardware.



  • Would apples iCloud service be an example of a public or a private Cloud model. I know you have to pay for it, but everyone has the opportunity to access it.



  • @connorsoliver said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Would apples iCloud service be an example of a public or a private Cloud model. I know you have to pay for it, but everyone has the opportunity to access it.

    iCloud would be public. The most common types of cloud are public, and virtually all consumer clouds are public. Private is expensive and requires hardware and expertise.

    Public Cloud - Infrastructure resources are managed by Cloud provider

    Private - Infrastructure is managed by your organization

    Hybrid - Mix between public and private cloud. Can be useful during outages and can reduce full private cloud costs.



  • @connorsoliver said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Would apples iCloud service be an example of a public or a private Cloud model. I know you have to pay for it, but everyone has the opportunity to access it.

    Neither, it is not cloud. Cloud in the case of iCloud is just marketing in the name. We have no idea if they use cloud or not in the solution, nor if it is public or private.

    iCloud is just a public non-cloud storage service. If there is any cloud in iCloud it is behind the scenes. The services provided by iCloud are public, but the service is not a cloud service. It's just pure storage.

    This is one of those majority cases where cloud is misused. In this case, it means literally nothing. Apple just added it during the peak of cloud hype. They are using cloud in the absolutely totally incorrect way of "hosted storage."



  • @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Public Cloud - Infrastructure resources are managed by Cloud provider
    Private - Infrastructure is managed by your organization
    Hybrid - Mix between public and private cloud. Can be useful during outages and can reduce full private cloud costs.

    That's not actually what it means. Public vs Private is actually used for whether the resources are shared or not. Amazon, Azure, IBM, and many others offer both public and private cloud options.

    We have a terminology matrix to explain the axis used for cloud terms. Also, who manages it is not a normally considered axis. That would be yet another dimension in the public v private, on prem v hosted, set of terms.

    https://mangolassi.it/topic/12023/cloud-computing-term-matrix



  • Public Cloud: Anyone can pay for and use resources on the cloud.

    Private Cloud: Only a single end user (company) or group of companies can use the resources on the cloud.

    All major public cloud providers offer private cloud, too.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Public Cloud - Infrastructure resources are managed by Cloud provider
    Private - Infrastructure is managed by your organization
    Hybrid - Mix between public and private cloud. Can be useful during outages and can reduce full private cloud costs.

    That's not actually what it means. Public vs Private is actually used for whether the resources are shared or not. Amazon, Azure, IBM, and many others offer both public and private cloud options.

    We have a terminology matrix to explain the axis used for cloud terms. Also, who manages it is not a normally considered axis. That would be yet another dimension in the public v private, on prem v hosted, set of terms.

    https://mangolassi.it/topic/12023/cloud-computing-term-matrix

    While technically you are correct, single tenancy is extremely rare. I almost never see that even at enterprise level. You could argue co-location is would be private, but essentially it is controlled by organization at that point anyway.



  • @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    While technically you are correct, single tenancy is extremely rare. I almost never see that even at enterprise level. You could argue co-location is would be private, but essentially it is controlled by organization at that point anyway.

    Not that rare. I've worked several places with it. These days, it's not as common as they've shown that public is more secure than private. Mostly people do private either because they need really special setups, of they are tin foil hat wearers.

    But loads of companies run their own in house, and many still use the private offerings from the big providers - normally just for special purpose stuff or things that regulatory doesn't allow on shared.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    While technically you are correct, single tenancy is extremely rare. I almost never see that even at enterprise level. You could argue co-location is would be private, but essentially it is controlled by organization at that point anyway.

    Not that rare. I've worked several places with it. These days, it's not as common as they've shown that public is more secure than private. Mostly people do private either because they need really special setups, of they are tin foil hat wearers.

    Isn't that technically a colo at that point because you have to account for the hardware to be sure it is really private? Even stuff like govcloud or china cloud is separate hardware of course, but still multi-tenancy (public).



  • @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    While technically you are correct, single tenancy is extremely rare. I almost never see that even at enterprise level. You could argue co-location is would be private, but essentially it is controlled by organization at that point anyway.

    Not that rare. I've worked several places with it. These days, it's not as common as they've shown that public is more secure than private. Mostly people do private either because they need really special setups, of they are tin foil hat wearers.

    Isn't that technically a colo at that point because you have to account for the hardware to be sure it is really private? Even stuff like govcloud or china cloud is separate hardware of course, but still multi-tenancy (public).

    Not really colo. Colo implies that you manage everything but the hardware. Cloud it a layer up from that.

    If you have private cloud AND it is hosted, then in theory there is a colocation piece as part of the equation. But it's a tiny part of the equation, and only applicable if the private cloud is hosted.

    Even Amazon offers private, on premises cloud offerings. So absolutely no colo involved in any sense, and that's AWS.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:
    private cloud is hosted.

    Even Amazon offers private, on premises cloud offerings. So absolutely no colo involved in any sense, and that's AWS.

    That's technically a hybrid though.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Not really colo. Colo implies that you manage everything but the hardware. Cloud it a layer up from that.

    If you have private cloud AND it is hosted, then in theory there is a colocation piece as part of the equation. But it's a tiny part of the equation, and only applicable if the private cloud is hosted.

    Colo is a major part of the equation because a true private cloud is not scalable in the same sense. Additional hardware will have to be configured before the cloud can be scaled.

    Rapid elasticity is a requirement to be defined as cloud. So in any private hosted cloud, the hardware must be very over provisioned to even be technically defined as cloud



  • @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Not really colo. Colo implies that you manage everything but the hardware. Cloud it a layer up from that.

    If you have private cloud AND it is hosted, then in theory there is a colocation piece as part of the equation. But it's a tiny part of the equation, and only applicable if the private cloud is hosted.

    Colo is a major part of the equation because a true private cloud is not scalable in the same sense. Additional hardware will have to be configured before the cloud can be scaled.

    Rapid elasticity is a requirement to be defined as cloud. So in any private hosted cloud, the hardware must be very over provisioned to even be technically defined as cloud

    Cloud doesn't imply a scalability of hardware, that's an assumption added years later and isn't part of cloud definition or purpose. The scalability of cloud is at the cloud layer, not the hardware layer. A cloud where someone "quickly adds hardware" or one that is "constrained to predetermined hardware limits" are equally cloud, as long as workloads can horizontally scale up and down within the confines of the hardware limitations.



  • @IRJ said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    @scottalanmiller said in Cloud Models - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:
    private cloud is hosted.

    Even Amazon offers private, on premises cloud offerings. So absolutely no colo involved in any sense, and that's AWS.

    That's technically a hybrid though.

    It's not. It's pure private, no hybrid anything. They do offer hybrid as well, every public cloud provider that provides private does hybrid, too, it's trivial at that point and no reason not to. But you have to get both public and private and merge them for it to be hybrid. You can get pure private from any of them as well.



  • It only seems like private isn't available because no one does that. Why wants private cloud? no one, not really. It's essentially a dumb idea. It basically exists for crazy people and governments where "good decision making" isn't a factor. But hybrid is ruled out in both of those cases either because it doesn't support the "crazy" or the legal government requirement.