Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain



  • I am looking to deploy a desktop photo to all the PC's in a domain.

    I have been able to do this but want the ability to change the photo easily and have it auto deploy again.

    I made the file name info.jpg and created the group policy. It deploys once but when I replace info.jpg with a file with the exact same name but different text on the photo it's not updating.

    Does Windows cache this on the local computers? If so, is there a way to either turn off that caching or force it to reapply the new image at startup?



  • @ccwtech

    Windows 7 or 10
    Server 2012 or 2016

    But yes,.. this should be doable.. looking



  • Why not set it via REGEDIT - .. and deploy via gpo... should work..

    https://www.top-password.com/blog/set-a-default-background-wallpaper-for-windows-10-desktop/



  • @gjacobse I am using method 1. It's just when the info.jpg changes (info.jpg replaced by a new info.jpg) it's not updating the wallpaper.



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @gjacobse I am using method 1. It's just when the info.jpg changes (info.jpg replaced by a new info.jpg) it's not updating the wallpaper.

    The computers probably have it stored in memory without a need to every go check the file after it's loaded. Have you tried a logout/login and reboot yet?


  • Service Provider

    0_1536112352443_31306c67-cffa-45e4-8902-d434433baa6d-image.png


  • Service Provider

    to speed up troubleshooting, do a gpupdate /force and reboot.



  • Are you doing the domain version of Method 1, or setting this via local policy? If you're doing a domain version of it, the only way I've had this work is to have another GPO copy the file from the UNC to a local drive using a REPLACE command, and then have the wallpaper setting GPO point to the local place. There is something about how the GPOs check for changes that cause it to not work properly.



  • Yes I did do a gpupdate /force and a logout / logon, also tried a reboot. No joy.

    @Kelly Method 1 - what GPO copy do I need to setup for it please?



  • Do you have this GPO set to reapply?



  • @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    Do you have this GPO set to reapply?

    I'm not sure. Can you tell me how I would know and/or change it to reapply?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    Do you have this GPO set to reapply?

    I'm not sure. Can you tell me how I would know and/or change it to reapply?

    This is an option on the GPO itself, run once, whereas you probably want "replace" where it will replace the local settings every time the GPO is run.



  • Here's what I do to set up a wallpaper background.
    0_1536245053360_86cb508d-322f-4200-8d73-48d4386eaf90-image.png

    0_1536245103737_fb35b847-10b8-4a21-9fd5-8a6ba7514952-image.png

    0_1536245136686_9e039dca-38e6-463e-a1af-abdae0593110-image.png



  • @black3dynamite Has it. The key is that the file copy is a computer policy and the desktop wallpaper is a user policy. Best practices would have you put them into different policies so that you can update the computer policy without having to process everything that hasn't changed in the user policy.



  • @black3dynamite So if you are pointing to the unc path on the server, what good does it do to copy the file to the local machine?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @black3dynamite So if you are pointing to the unc path on the server, what good does it do to copy the file to the local machine?

    So the machine can go offline and keep your settings.



  • The big question though is not how to apply it. But how to make it update when you change the photo. @black3dynamite have you tested that part?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The big question though is not how to apply it. But how to make it update when you change the photo. @black3dynamite have you tested that part?

    You "update" the GPO settings.



  • The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.



  • @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.



  • @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?



  • @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?

    Yes, so I need to point the wallpaper to load it from the computer not the server?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?

    Yes, so I need to point the wallpaper to load it from the computer not the server?

    Yes, for the user policy it is the local path on the computer.



  • I have a similar issue. Followed the directions and ensure the gpo's get applied. I can verify the file gets copied down locally and the policy is applied to set it as the wallpaper, however, the wallpaper shown on all pc's is just a blank black screen. If I go into personalize to set it manually the correct local file is set but just does not show up.

    Windows 2012 R2
    Windows 7 pro and Windows 10 pro both exhibit the same behaviors.



  • @i3 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    I have a similar issue. Followed the directions and ensure the gpo's get applied. I can verify the file gets copied down locally and the policy is applied to set it as the wallpaper, however, the wallpaper shown on all pc's is just a blank black screen. If I go into personalize to set it manually the correct local file is set but just does not show up.

    Windows 2012 R2
    Windows 7 pro and Windows 10 pro both exhibit the same behaviors.

    Can you post your rsop or gpresult.html?



  • @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?

    Yes, so I need to point the wallpaper to load it from the computer not the server?

    Yes, for the user policy it is the local path on the computer.

    Kelly, when you move the file will it update if you don't update the policy with the new file name but instead keep the name the same in the wallpaper gpo?



  • @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?

    Yes, so I need to point the wallpaper to load it from the computer not the server?

    Yes, for the user policy it is the local path on the computer.

    Kelly, when you move the file will it update if you don't update the policy with the new file name but instead keep the name the same in the wallpaper gpo?

    So if you move photo.jpg from C:\Users\Public\ to C:\Temp\Shared? I'm not completely sure I understand the scenario you're describing?



  • @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @kelly said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @ccwtech said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    @dustinb3403 said in Desktop photo for all PC's in the domain:

    The easiest way I've found to get a GPO to update, is to one, set it to "update" and in cases like screensavers (backgrounds etc), literally just name the anything else.

    "bg.jpg" the new one gets changed to "bg1.jpg" etc.

    Trying to do this without the user touching GPO. I'm still fuzzy on how to set the GPO to update?

    You only change the file copy GPO. I would have a different file name in your source file like 20180907_info.jpg. That way the GPO will process because it detects a change event. You can have the same destination file.

    That would require editing of the GPO that applies the wallpaper.

    It depends on how you set it up. My preferred method, and I believe best practice, is that you split your policies. The User policy applies the wallpaper based on <localpath>\picture.jpg. The computer policy copies the wallpaper from <remotepath>\20180907_picture.jpg to <localpath>\picture.jpg. When you need to update the wallpaper you place 2018xxxxx_picture.jpg in <remotepath> and update the policy to the new file name. When the machine reboots or refreshes its policies it copies the file from <remotepath> to <localpath>. When the user logs in the user policy is applied which uses the same file name (because as far as it is concerned nothing changed), but the new wallpaper is loaded because it is a different image.

    Does that make sense?

    Yes, so I need to point the wallpaper to load it from the computer not the server?

    Yes, for the user policy it is the local path on the computer.

    Kelly, when you move the file will it update if you don't update the policy with the new file name but instead keep the name the same in the wallpaper gpo?

    So if you move photo.jpg from C:\Users\Public\ to C:\Temp\Shared? I'm not completely sure I understand the scenario you're describing?

    What I want to do is to put a photo names info.jpg either on the server and have a GPO to point to that file to use as wallpaper.

    Without touching the GPO that points to info.jpg I want the end user to be able to replace info.jpg with another file called info.jpg that has the same name but it's a different photo with the same name. Then the desktop updates on each workstation.

    It seems like either copying the file from the server to the local workstation or pointing to the file on the server both require that you change the GPO for wallpaper and do a info1.jpg, info2.jpg to update the wallpaper GPO each time you change the photo.

    I don't want the end user to mess with GPO but do trust them to simply save another file with the same name.