Why haven't telcos moved to SIP/VOIP for home service?



  • Just a fat chewing question here.

    Why don't you think telco's have moved home phone service to SIP/VOIP?

    One reason I can think of is power. POTS style lines provide all of the power needed to run the phone in a typical house in case of power outages, you can still get your calls.

    Also, POTS phones are super cheap. Brand new for less than $10.



  • I think a global PBX would be awesome. Everyone just goes out and buys a modestly priced VoIP phone. Connects it to their wireless and they would be free to call anyone in the world.

    The reasons service providers aren't doing this (at least in the US) is because POTS lines are abundant. Fibre is not. Which with having a global community on VoIP service you'd really need more throughput.

    @scottalanmiller Ferrari vs Tractor analogy



  • It'd sure be nice to repurpose all that copper hanging in the air


  • Service Provider

    i know that comcast, my isp, offers sip. when your power goes out......the routers have a battery in them :)telco doesn't go sip b/c telco is invested. the longer they can just maintain their current MOB, the better for them.


  • Banned

    Many Telco's including verizon have. Even a local small Teleco has.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    I think a global PBX would be awesome. Everyone just goes out and buys a modestly priced VoIP phone. Connects it to their wireless and they would be free to call anyone in the world.

    The reasons service providers aren't doing this (at least in the US) is because POTS lines are abundant. Fibre is not. Which with having a global community on VoIP service you'd really need more throughput.

    @scottalanmiller Ferrari vs Tractor analogy

    Nah - high speed internet is available to most anyone who lives in a city. If those people can get Netflix, they can easily get phone service over that same line. Those in more rural areas have fewer or no options toward this.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    I think a global PBX would be awesome. Everyone just goes out and buys a modestly priced VoIP phone. Connects it to their wireless and they would be free to call anyone in the world.

    Don't we already have this, it's called Skype, or any of a myriad of other solutions.



  • Keeping a near ubiquitous connection platform is the goal here.

    Almost everyone has a phone number, just like everyone has email. For these reasons working within these confines would make the transition to some new underpinning for the technology would be easiest to bring the average consumer on board.

    While we already have many options that provide these services, Skype, Apple Talk, Hangouts, etc, these services are not ubiquitous like a phone number is.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @DustinB3403 said:

    I think a global PBX would be awesome. Everyone just goes out and buys a modestly priced VoIP phone. Connects it to their wireless and they would be free to call anyone in the world.

    Don't we already have this, it's called Skype, or any of a myriad of other solutions.

    we have a global PBX in a form. if you consider calling Joey_Skype98636 a phone number... As you state later a uniform platform that is usable globally. To call whomever.

    I'd imagine using an IPv6 address would be the number you'd dial.



  • Personally I don't have a preference what the ID used to register myself on the network. True we've been used to phone numbers for 60+ years, but there's no reason we need to stick with a string of 10 numbers like we have in the US. Joey_Skype98636 should be totally fine.


  • Service Provider

    AT&T has been moving to this. Their UVerse voice service is all VoIP over a copper pair with no dialtone on it.



  • Cox is technically all VOIP, but the modem they install into your home converts it to analog/copper to work with your traditional POTS phones.



  • Are any of these providers who are deploying VOIP actually putting VOIP handsets into people's homes? or just doing a simple conversion to analog?



  • They all are doing a conversion to analog as far as I know.



  • The conversion from VOIP to analog that Cox is doing provides two things.

    1. compatibility with all of the old telephone systems around the globel
    2. a way to continue billing you for something you could mostly get over just the ISP portion of that company.

    Considering these things, it makes me wonder if traditional phones/phone numbers will ever die?

    Clearly cell phones don't need to use the 'phone' technology that they use, instead they could move everything over to SIP and use the data connection instead of the phone connection. What prevents them from wanting to make this switch? other than perhaps investment in infrastructure?



  • @brianlittlejohn said:

    They all are doing a conversion to analog as far as I know.

    In this case, this is not providing the service my OP is about.

    Why do we need telephones anymore? Assuming we can build some redundancies into the internet connectivity, example batteries in cable modems, would could move calls away from the old telephoney switches to a modern connection system like Skype.


  • Banned

    @Dashrender said:

    Nah - high speed internet is available to most anyone who lives in a city. If those people can get Netflix, they can easily get phone service over that same line. Those in more rural areas have fewer or no options toward this.

    Rural area's have high speed internet too though it's pretty much only Cable, no DSL options.



  • @Jason said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Nah - high speed internet is available to most anyone who lives in a city. If those people can get Netflix, they can easily get phone service over that same line. Those in more rural areas have fewer or no options toward this.

    Rural area's have high speed internet too though it's pretty much only Cable, no DSL options.

    Sure some, maybe even most do (frankly have no clue). But there are many that don't. I'm not sure if the laws requiring Teleco's to provide affordable phone service to rural America cover providing affordable internet access or not?


  • Service Provider

    @Jason said:

    Rural area's have high speed internet too though it's pretty much only Cable, no DSL options.

    The towns in rural america may have cable service or variable quality, but the farmhouses certainly do not.
    Growing up in southern Illinois, I certainly felt the lack of communication.
    Back in the late 80's all calls outside of town were long distance. Getting on the various BBSs was a horribly expensive endeavor, because nothing was a local call.

    The lack of desire by the bid red V and death star to do anything with rural america is horrible.

    When I was growing up the local telco was GTE North. bought/sold/blah. Finally landed as Verizon at the time DSL was introduced at the turn of the century. Guess what. Still no DSL available there.

    The local cable company in the 80's was eventually to become Charter. They did bring out internet service at the turn of the century, so pretty much everyone has it. But come 2007 Charter had never bothered to ever update the systems and service was horrible.

    It drove my hometown to finally spin up their own fiber project. The local populace started the process got things on a ballot in 2009 and now they are a fiber town. It was amazing that Charter suddenly had truck all over the entire town for more than a year after the city fiber project actually had a few council hearings and was gaining traction.



  • Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)



  • @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    My parents, lol.



  • @dafyre said:

    @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    My parents, lol.

    Mine as well - also lots of people around here with cable modem bundles, it works out near enough to free when bundled with a big TV package & intertubes.





  • @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    I do, since I still have cable and internet, it saves me money bundling and keeping the phone service. Canceling my $12/month phone would cost me $35 in bundle savings.


  • Service Provider

    @MattSpeller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    My parents, lol.

    Mine as well - also lots of people around here with cable modem bundles, it works out near enough to free when bundled with a big TV package & intertubes.

    Neither of mine. I fixed that issue years ago, they only have cell phones. My sister had a Vonage account because of young kids in the house and that I do not want to manage anything. then a few years back I converted her over to a Obi100 and a Google Voice number.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    I do, since I still have cable and internet, it saves me money bundling and keeping the phone service. Canceling my $12/month phone would cost me $35 in bundle savings.

    That is super fuct.


  • Service Provider

    @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    @Dashrender said:

    I do, since I still have cable and internet, it saves me money bundling and keeping the phone service. Canceling my $12/month phone would cost me $35 in bundle savings.

    Get rid of the Cable service too then.



  • @RojoLoco said:

    @Dashrender said:

    @RojoLoco said:

    Who has a home phone anymore? (besides my parents)

    I do, since I still have cable and internet, it saves me money bundling and keeping the phone service. Canceling my $12/month phone would cost me $35 in bundle savings.

    That is super fuct.

    My parents tried to cancel their home phone service and their bill would have gone up like that as well, so now its set to 2 rings and goes to voicemail. Nobody they want to talk to calls them on it.


  • Service Provider

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    My parents tried to cancel their home phone service and their bill would have gone up like that as well, so now its set to 2 rings and goes to voicemail. Nobody they want to talk to calls them on it.

    Unplug it so it can never ring then?



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    My parents tried to cancel their home phone service and their bill would have gone up like that as well, so now its set to 2 rings and goes to voicemail. Nobody they want to talk to calls them on it.

    Unplug it so it can never ring then?

    I told them to do that and they won't do it, but they were fine cancelling it all together... it wasn't worth the argument, so I let them do what they wanted to do.


 

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