Do you use Antimalware software in addition to Antivirus software?



  • Well, like the title asks.

    I currently don't, and hadn't really considered it. At least I don't use anything that's not part of my AV solution.

    you?



  • We use Webroot for AV and MalwareBytes for AM.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    We use Webroot for AV and MalwareBytes for AM.

    and you find the expense worth while?



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    We use Webroot for AV and MalwareBytes for AM.

    and you find the expense worth while?

    Yup



  • With Malwarebytes, do you stick with a Premium license ($30/PC/year) or go for the endpoint solution ($50/PC/year)?



  • @WingCreative I would expect the Endpoint solution.

    Anything not centrally managed is just more costly to attempt to manage. At any size.


  • Banned

    @DustinB3403 said:

    @WingCreative I would expect the Endpoint solution.

    Anything not centrally managed is just more costly to attempt to manage. At any size.

    I wouldn't say at any size Small companies with 10-20 wouldn't worth the cost.



  • Well it's a matter of hours.

    If it takes 3 minutes to clean up(scan/remove/reboot/recan) malware on 1 PC and you have 20 PC's you're spending 1 Hour of IT time on managing a solution across those 20 machines.

    What's you're IT person's rate? For simple math lets use $25/Hour

    So the company has already spent $25 to clean up a known incident.

    If you want to regularly scan your systems for malware this would have to become a scheduled task. Which with the standalone versions, has scheduling, but still requires input from the IT person or user.

    So again back to weekly task, 20 computers at 1 Hour per week with a rate of 25/Hour, 52 weeks a year. You're look at $1300 a year.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    @WingCreative I would expect the Endpoint solution.

    Anything not centrally managed is just more costly to attempt to manage. At any size.

    Not at any size. And especially not if your end users are mostly technical. We do not use the centrally managed option, although I would like to see that added.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    What's you're IT person's rate? For simple math lets use $25/Hour

    If the employee is making $25/hour, then the cost to the company is not $25/hour, it is higher.



  • We aren't including the downtime of the system being worked on.

    Straight company cost to work on a group of devices.

    If the employees rate if $25/Hour and it takes 1 hour to complete, the company pays out $25. They don't pay for lost productivity. That's a backend cost that can't easily (and in this imaginary scenario) be quantified.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @DustinB3403 said:

    What's you're IT person's rate? For simple math lets use $25/Hour

    If the employee is making $25/hour, then the cost to the company is not $25/hour, it is higher.

    LOL, but you're missing the point of his post.



  • @Dashrender said:

    LOL, but you're missing the point of his post.

    I understand the point, but use more realistic numbers.

    The cost to the company for that employee will be at least $31.25 (125%) but I like to calculate rough numbers for unknown company structures at (150%) so that would be $37.50 to the company for that $25/hour worker.



  • not to mention the 15 mins of interruption to that employee that you kicked out of his seat to do the 3 min job.

    Since we're nitpicking the costs here, lol



  • There is also the possibility that someone runs many of them, at once, after hours so the cost of the IT staff is much lower, possibly free if it is done with idle time from a help desk resource, and no non-IT staff are interrupted.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    @WingCreative I would expect the Endpoint solution.

    Anything not centrally managed is just more costly to attempt to manage. At any size.

    Maybe I am reading this wrong, but I think what @WingCreative was asking is the Malwarebytes Endpoint Security $50 vs Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Business $30 , both of which have centralized management.

    According to This comparison chart the only difference between the two is "Advanced anti-exploit protection
    (Patent-pending exploit mitigation technology)"

    Please correct me if I am wrong; however, I am not sure what "Advanced anti-exploitation" is other than a marketing term, let alone is it worth an extra $20 per PC .



  • I think that that was what he was asking. Here is the chart, if people can read it:

    malwarebytes.png



  • @donaldlandru said:

    @DustinB3403 said:

    @WingCreative I would expect the Endpoint solution.

    Anything not centrally managed is just more costly to attempt to manage. At any size.

    Maybe I am reading this wrong, but I think what @WingCreative was asking is the Malwarebytes Endpoint Security $50 vs Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Business $30 , both of which have centralized management.

    According to This comparison chart the only difference between the two is "Advanced anti-exploit protection
    (Patent-pending exploit mitigation technology)"

    Please correct me if I am wrong; however, I am not sure what "Advanced anti-exploitation" is other than a marketing term, let alone is it worth an extra $20 per PC .

    That's exactly the question I was asking, thanks for clarifying 🙂 Although I wasn't aware the $30/mo option had centralized management too!



  • @scottalanmiller since you are the only one who has said they are running this. I have a couple questions that I think add value.

    1. Are you running MBAM for Business, MB Endpoint, or some other flavor that us mere mortals don't have access too?
    2. If using MB Endpoint can you qualify what "Advanced anti-exploit protection" is?
    3. What is your take on Malware protection on production Windows servers (AD, file, print, SharePoint, etc) -- is it required?

    According to the techspecs they say the product is unsupported on server core installations, I would think any Windows device is susceptible to malware if one tries hard enough.

    upload-a7e76958-46c1-4069-91ba-36fec4697a9a


  • Banned

    @DustinB3403 said:

    If it takes 3 minutes to clean up(scan/remove/reboot/recan) malware on 1 PC and you have 20 PC's you're spending 1 Hour of IT time on managing a solution across those 20 machines.

    Central management doesn't play to much in cleaning, yes it can still do it automatically as does standalone endpoints. but you really should still have a technician touch a computer that has had an infection.



  • @Jason Of course you should for confirmation, but the point of any centrally managed solution is so that you don't have to.

    You push updates, you push scans, you push removals, and even system restarts.


  • Banned

    @DustinB3403 said:

    @Jason Of course you should for confirmation, but the point of any centrally managed solution is so that you don't have to.

    You push updates, you push scans, you push removals, and even system restarts.

    Centrally managed doesn't mean you don't need to confirm, that's not the point. The point is alerts. And also ease of deployment in a large environment.

    That's not how centrally managed AV works. It does not "push" definition updates. The AV client pulls them, you might have a local cache of updates, but it's still pulling them and you don't generally pick and choose. You can push scheduled scans with GPO's even with standalone endpoints.