Why Virtualize?



  • I've been wondering for a while now, but what is the purpose/goal of Virtual Machines?
    What do you use them for in everyday life as an IT pro?

    Why would someone want to learn this?
    why Is it required for most/all IT Jobs That I've seen?

    Is there a certification course?



  • The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?



  • @WrCombs

    why waste all resources on single OS ? what if a program runs better on specific OS what will you do then ? Also if virus infects single OS your screwed



  • @Emad-R said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs

    why waste all resources on single OS ? what if a program runs better on specific OS what will you do then ? Also if virus infects single OS your screwed

    So by Virtualizing you're spreading out the resources to different OS's ?
    i understand the program needing specifics or running better you'd want to have a way to get there,
    what does virus protection have to do with single os?



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    A Hypervisor host allows you to use divvy up resource to create VMs. You can set appropriate workloads on each VM and monitor those VMs as needs increase or decrease. You can change things like RAM, CPU cores, etc quickly and easily to meet your needs.

    Essentially in 2019 you shouldn't consider a physical host without using a hypervisor unless there is a very specific reason for doing so.



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Emad-R said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs

    what does virus protection have to do with single os?

    VMs are separated so a virus cannot go from VM to VM . Once in awhile there have been host exploits to get around this, but they generally pretty rare.



  • @IRJ said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Emad-R said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs

    what does virus protection have to do with single os?

    VMs are separated so a virus cannot go from VM to VM . Once in awhile there have been host exploits to get around this, but they generally pretty rare.

    ah, That makes more sense.



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.



  • one of the major benefits you get is hardware abstraction - this means you can move the VM to almost any other hardware and it doesn't know any difference. In the case of a disaster, you build a new server with the hypervisor, restore the VM from backups and just go.



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    Is there a certification course?

    It is very important to have a basic understanding virtualization because damn near everything is virtualized these days. Once you have a basic understanding, you would be better off learning Cloud technologies. It is virtualization on steriods.



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    What is virtualization?
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/virtualization/hyper-v-on-windows/about/

    Hyper-V Architecture
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/virtualization/hyper-v-on-windows/reference/hyper-v-architecture

    Azure Virtual Machines Overview
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/windows/overview

    Blog
    https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Virtualization/bg-p/Virtualization



  • @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    You have to be careful with the container term as a VM and a container are technically different, but using container is a good term to help get the point across.



  • @IRJ said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    You have to be careful with the container term as a VM and a container are technically different, but using container is a good term to help get the point across.

    yeah - I know... containers came on the scene.. now we have to be extra careful in how we explain things...



  • @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.

    uh - why exactly was that?



  • @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.

    uh - why exactly was that?

    Cause I dont know any better obviously.



  • Also, watch the 2nd and 3rd videos in the introduction here (free). They explain it for the most part:

    https://www.udemy.com/course/virtualization-intro/



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.

    uh - why exactly was that?

    Cause I dont know any better obviously.

    Awww.. well - good amount of answers here so far - just be prepared for Scott's answer when he gets around to ya 🙂



  • There's probably a ton of YouTube vids as well.



  • @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.

    uh - why exactly was that?

    Cause I dont know any better obviously.

    Awww.. well - good amount of answers here so far - just be prepared for Scott's answer when he gets around to ya 🙂

    Yeah.. and the Conversations that stem from it



  • @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Dashrender said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    @WrCombs said in Why Virtualize?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer is because of consolidation, footprint, energy, cooling, cost savings, administration simplification.

    The long answer is paging @scottalanmiller.

    okay.. How does it work?

    How does virtualization work? Just like running a program on Windows 10, each VM is a separate program that runs on the hypervisor.

    and in a regular set up you'd use this to run servers? controllers? back ups? Images?

    Those are weird things to list together.

    A VM is nothing more than a server running in a container instead of directly on the hardware it's running on.

    i.e. You have a physical server - you install a hypervisor (the thing that allows you to have VMs running under it)... then you create VMs under the hypervisor. Each VM acts like it's own piece of physical hardware - in general, the Operating System running in the VM has no idea that it's not running on physical hardware (OK before someone blasts me, most OSes today do know they are running in a VM, but that's beside the point)... now treat each VM as if it was running on it's own hardware.

    well, that's why I was asking the question the way I did.

    uh - why exactly was that?

    Cause I dont know any better obviously.

    Awww.. well - good amount of answers here so far - just be prepared for Scott's answer when he gets around to ya 🙂

    Yeah.. and the Conversations that stem from it

    Go to the Youtube vids or Udemy course if you want focused material on it. Then the sidebar conversations will make more sense.



  • The simple answer to "why virtualize" is that if you don't, everyone here will make fun of you (ask me how I know).



  • @RojoLoco said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer to "why virtualize" is that if you don't, everyone here will make fun of you (ask me how I know).

    It is difficult to have a valid reason to run a physical server anymore.



  • @IRJ said in Why Virtualize?:

    @RojoLoco said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer to "why virtualize" is that if you don't, everyone here will make fun of you (ask me how I know).

    It is difficult to have a valid reason to run a physical server anymore.

    There's always a snowflake reason, but you should always virtualize unless you have super specific reasons not to.



  • @Obsolesce said in Why Virtualize?:

    @IRJ said in Why Virtualize?:

    @RojoLoco said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer to "why virtualize" is that if you don't, everyone here will make fun of you (ask me how I know).

    It is difficult to have a valid reason to run a physical server anymore.

    There's always a snowflake reason, but you should always virtualize unless you have super specific reasons not to.

    When I first got my current job, those reasons were mostly "the boss says 1:1 physical systems". I later found out that like 10+ years ago they got SCREWED by a poorly implemented VM Ware setup for production systems. Cost them some customers and a bunch of money, so it kinda made sense. I've been working really hard to break them out of their late 90s mindset.



  • @RojoLoco said in Why Virtualize?:

    @Obsolesce said in Why Virtualize?:

    @IRJ said in Why Virtualize?:

    @RojoLoco said in Why Virtualize?:

    The simple answer to "why virtualize" is that if you don't, everyone here will make fun of you (ask me how I know).

    It is difficult to have a valid reason to run a physical server anymore.

    There's always a snowflake reason, but you should always virtualize unless you have super specific reasons not to.

    When I first got my current job, those reasons were mostly "the boss says 1:1 physical systems". I later found out that like 10+ years ago they got SCREWED by a poorly implemented VM Ware setup for production systems. Cost them some customers and a bunch of money, so it kinda made sense. I've been working really hard to break them out of their late 90s mindset.

    Yeah, that's not your fault and totally out of your hands. It's extremely hard to change the mind of older generations no matter how right you are and no matter how grossly wrong they are. There's usually a lot of emotion in their reasoning as well.



  • @Obsolesce exactly, plus the IT guy before me sucked, so I had a while before they really listened to my advice. We are about to roll out a physical SQL server, but I'm trying to get them to put hyper-v 1st and then just the 1 VM with all available resources to test the performance.