Linux OS Thoughts?



  • Alright my Linux Peeps
    Let's have a discussion on what would be the best Linus Flavor for Coming from windows moving to Linux and wanting to learn more and use Linux everyday?
    what do you suggest to be the best to start off with and things to keep in mind?

    What should I look for in the OS to help me decide which one would work best for me?
    I'm sure we've had discussions about it in the past ; but lets bring it up again and see what has changed since the last time we had these discussions.

    Appreciate it!





  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Coming from windows moving to Linux and wanting to learn more and use Linux everyday?

    Completely depends on what you want to learn, do you need a Desktop environment on this system, and are you wanting to "Learn Linux" or just not be constrained by choices others have made when they made a bad purchasing decision?



  • @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Coming from windows moving to Linux and wanting to learn more and use Linux everyday?

    Completely depends on what you want to learn, do you need a Desktop environment on this system, and are you wanting to "Learn Linux" or just not be constrained by choices others have made when they made a bad purchasing decision?

    Learn linux - But with out the " "



  • @WrCombs

    Oh no not thing again ...

    If you want to work with Linux, and you live in US/Canada go with Fedora to learn RHEL.

    If you want to enjoy and have fun go with openSUSE, it will surprise you how much polished and underrated just cause it is from EU.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Let's have a discussion on what would be the best Linus Flavor for Coming from windows moving to Linux and wanting to learn more and use Linux everyday?

    So many great Linux OS desktop choices. But, at this point, I feel that your two best options are...

    Fedora 30 with Cinnamon. Gives you a look and feel of Windows 7 but modern. Works great.

    Ubuntu 19.10 with the stock Gnome 3 desktop. More modern and doesn't pretend to be Windows. Overall, I'm feeling like this is the big winner right now. It's fast, easy to use, and has the broadest support at this point. I'm a massive Fedora and Suse fan, but Ubuntu seems to be where it is at right now.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Coming from windows moving to Linux and wanting to learn more and use Linux everyday?

    Completely depends on what you want to learn, do you need a Desktop environment on this system, and are you wanting to "Learn Linux" or just not be constrained by choices others have made when they made a bad purchasing decision?

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Linux desktop and Linux server are very different from a learning perspective.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?



  • @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    looking at Linux Administration.

    A bit broad, but at least it's a start. Are you wanting to stand up Linux servers to be used as web hosts, cloud host, Hypervisors, something else?

    If so, most of this is a single command for a lot of it today.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    Spend money on RHEL, really? When we were just telling him to not spend money on Windows 10 Pro for his work provided computer.

    In a lab/home environment, sure that makes sense, but this is discussing his career. Which I would lean towards Fedora as a jump point.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    Spend money on RHEL, really? When we were just telling him to not spend money on Windows 10 Pro for his work provided computer.

    In a lab/home environment, sure that makes sense, but this is discussing his career. Which I would lean towards Fedora as a jump point.

    Meant to write CentOS 8.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    what is RHEL8??



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    what is RHEL8??

    He means CentOS 8 https://www.centos.org

    RHEL is the "Business version" of CentOS



  • @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    Spend money on RHEL, really? When we were just telling him to not spend money on Windows 10 Pro for his work provided computer.

    In a lab/home environment, sure that makes sense, but this is discussing his career. Which I would lean towards Fedora as a jump point.

    RHEL is still free (as far as I know) it's just a HUGE PITA to get your hands on if you don't buy support for it.



  • @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    Spend money on RHEL, really? When we were just telling him to not spend money on Windows 10 Pro for his work provided computer.

    In a lab/home environment, sure that makes sense, but this is discussing his career. Which I would lean towards Fedora as a jump point.

    RHEL is still free (as far as I know) it's just a HUGE PITA to get your hands on if you don't buy support for it.

    Interesting, but is there really a value to using RHEL without support?



  • @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Learn linux - But with out the " "

    Okay so let's break this down one more step. What about Linux do you want to learn?

    If you looked at Linux like the day you go your learners permit, it's just learning what the tools are and how to use them. Is there something specific you are wanting to do with Linux?

    looking at Linux Administration.

    Oh, in the case, installing RHEL 8 is probably the best place to start.

    Spend money on RHEL, really? When we were just telling him to not spend money on Windows 10 Pro for his work provided computer.

    In a lab/home environment, sure that makes sense, but this is discussing his career. Which I would lean towards Fedora as a jump point.

    RHEL is still free (as far as I know) it's just a HUGE PITA to get your hands on if you don't buy support for it.

    You can get it for free through a dev account, but it's offered through CentOS as the free version unless you build it from source yourself.



  • Yeah just found the link

    https://developers.redhat.com/products/rhel/download

    They do want a lot of details, but meh.



  • Linux Distros ( Desktop/Laptop Use )
    Each distro that I'm listing provides a Live images.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @IRJ said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Stick to LTS versions (...hides)

    what is LTS Versions vs. Bleeding Edge

    That's not a comparison. They are saying Bleeding Edge in an attempt to discredit "Current Releases." Bleeding edge is something wholly different.

    LTS: Long Term Support. These are OS releases that are selected (every major vendor does this... Windows, RHEL, Ubuntu, Suse, etc.) to get "support" for a really long time with a guarantee that the code versions won't change. It's a locked release that you can install and use and get "support" for a long time. I say "support" because it's not always what it sounds like. Ubuntu doesn't offer anything we'd call actual support for their LTS, it's all a marketing thing not a tech thing.

    Current Release: This is the current product release from a vendor. Windows, RH, Ubuntu, Suse all offer these. Windows, RH, and Ubuntu all have a ~6 month release cycle for current. Suse alone uses a rolling release model. None of these imply anything like cutting or bleeding edge, those terms would denote a misunderstanding of what releases are. A current release can easily include software that is decades old, nothing about it implies a faster release of packages. And if it did, Ubuntu LTS is also "Current" every 18 months, so if bleeding edge is bad, then their LTS is also bad because they would overlap.

    Current selections of both....

    Windows:
    LTS: Windows LTSB 1809
    Current: 1903

    Red Hat:
    LTS: CentOS 8 / RHEL 8
    Current: Fedora 30

    Ubuntu:
    LTS: 1804
    Current: 1910

    Suse:
    LTS: OpenSuse Leap
    Current: OpenSuse Tumbleweed

    Actually 1909 has been released officially.

    That's what I got on my new laptop.. weird.

    why is that weird?



  • @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @IRJ said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Stick to LTS versions (...hides)

    what is LTS Versions vs. Bleeding Edge

    That's not a comparison. They are saying Bleeding Edge in an attempt to discredit "Current Releases." Bleeding edge is something wholly different.

    LTS: Long Term Support. These are OS releases that are selected (every major vendor does this... Windows, RHEL, Ubuntu, Suse, etc.) to get "support" for a really long time with a guarantee that the code versions won't change. It's a locked release that you can install and use and get "support" for a long time. I say "support" because it's not always what it sounds like. Ubuntu doesn't offer anything we'd call actual support for their LTS, it's all a marketing thing not a tech thing.

    Current Release: This is the current product release from a vendor. Windows, RH, Ubuntu, Suse all offer these. Windows, RH, and Ubuntu all have a ~6 month release cycle for current. Suse alone uses a rolling release model. None of these imply anything like cutting or bleeding edge, those terms would denote a misunderstanding of what releases are. A current release can easily include software that is decades old, nothing about it implies a faster release of packages. And if it did, Ubuntu LTS is also "Current" every 18 months, so if bleeding edge is bad, then their LTS is also bad because they would overlap.

    Current selections of both....

    Windows:
    LTS: Windows LTSB 1809
    Current: 1903

    Red Hat:
    LTS: CentOS 8 / RHEL 8
    Current: Fedora 30

    Ubuntu:
    LTS: 1804
    Current: 1910

    Suse:
    LTS: OpenSuse Leap
    Current: OpenSuse Tumbleweed

    Actually 1909 has been released officially.

    That's what I got on my new laptop.. weird.

    why is that weird?

    cause i was just about to say that also.



  • Back to the OP.

    @WrCombs wants to things most likely...

    a desktop environment to run in - So Fedora or Ubuntu most likely... and then a separate "server" box to install Linux Server OSes on to experiment with to do things like - setup FreePBX, setup NC, setup file server, etc.



  • @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Back to the OP.

    @WrCombs wants to things most likely...

    a desktop environment to run in - So Fedora or Ubuntu most likely... and then a separate "server" box to install Linux Server OSes on to experiment with to do things like - setup FreePBX, setup NC, setup file server, etc.

    yes.
    I could even VM those, right? or no? - Forgive the newbness, but I'm thinking a Desktop and then run a VM Boxes with server OS's to do what @Dashrender is saying and thoughts on which ones to try.



  • @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Back to the OP.

    @WrCombs wants to things most likely...

    a desktop environment to run in - So Fedora or Ubuntu most likely... and then a separate "server" box to install Linux Server OSes on to experiment with to do things like - setup FreePBX, setup NC, setup file server, etc.

    yes.
    I could even VM those, right? or no? - Forgive the newbness, but I'm thinking a Desktop and then run a VM Boxes with server OS's to do what @Dashrender is saying and thoughts on which ones to try.

    Boxes is weird, but yes. Throw Fedora or Ubuntu onto a laptop or desktop, install KVM, and virtualize anything that you want. You get a fully functional, and gorgeous desktop environment, but can test any server OS or alternative desktop OS that you like.



  • @black3dynamite said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Linux Distros ( Desktop/Laptop Use )
    Each distro that I'm listing provides a Live images.

    And Deepin, and Solus.



  • I saw a couple of mentions of Laptops... Ubuntu 19.10 supposedly ships with NVIDIA drivers that play nicely with the Intel+NVIDIA type graphics setups. I haven't tried this... yet... but I am definitely planning on it!



  • All depends on what you want to learn and how much breakage you're willing to deal with.

    Everyone on here (myself included) is likely to have a certain bias for their own preferred flavor. Check out distrowatch if you haven't already done so for reviews and information on any of the suggestions offered.

    Linux has come a long way from when I started using Slackware back around 2002. From there I went to Kubuntu, Sabayon, Mint and now Manjaro (Cinnamon) on desktop / laptops. Work has been mostly Ubuntu and Debian with some centos and centos-based products (xenserver) in the mix.

    To come back to your question, it depends on whether you're looking to learn from a work-skills perspective or personal curiosity. If you want to do a real deep-dive you could do Linux from Scratch, Gentoo or Arch....

    My personal recommendation (bias included) is to run Manjaro Cinnamon and use KVM or VirtualBox to experiment with other distros.
    Reasons:

    • Rolling release is awesome
    • It's close to bleeding edge, but still very stable
    • AUR is like PPAs but so much better.


  • @dafyre said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    I saw a couple of mentions of Laptops... Ubuntu 19.10 supposedly ships with NVIDIA drivers that play nicely with the Intel+NVIDIA type graphics setups. I haven't tried this... yet... but I am definitely planning on it!

    Pop! OS is another too. They provide two different images, Intel/AMD and Nvidia.



  • The best thing is to run a full Linux desktop that makes every point and click the same as windows.

    The point is to make the day to day tasks transparent in the change.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @WrCombs said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    @Dashrender said in Linux OS Thoughts?:

    Back to the OP.

    @WrCombs wants to things most likely...

    a desktop environment to run in - So Fedora or Ubuntu most likely... and then a separate "server" box to install Linux Server OSes on to experiment with to do things like - setup FreePBX, setup NC, setup file server, etc.

    yes.
    I could even VM those, right? or no? - Forgive the newbness, but I'm thinking a Desktop and then run a VM Boxes with server OS's to do what @Dashrender is saying and thoughts on which ones to try.

    Boxes is weird, but yes. Throw Fedora or Ubuntu onto a laptop or desktop, install KVM, and virtualize anything that you want. You get a fully functional, and gorgeous desktop environment, but can test any server OS or alternative desktop OS that you like.

    sounds like the likely chose..
    I know they're out there; anyone got the link for the guides?