What's in your bag?



  • What's in your everyday carry bag?



  • Nothing. Don't even have a carry bag.



  • Laptop. Couple cables. Pens.



  • Laptop, USB3 HDD, USB flash drive, USB to SATA, power cord, notebooks (very few notes actually taken, don't know why I keep them), and a USB3 to network adapter, phone charger, USB to Type-C cord. That's the normal stuff anyway.

    Yes, we do a lot of bench work.



  • @aaronstuder Couple pens, Notebook, Laptop, USB 3.0 Flash Drives, Two Ethernet Cables and multipurpose tools.



  • My lunch, ibuprofen, and my dumbphone



  • I switched to backpacks many years ago.
    https://us.targus.com/products/checkpoint-friendly-air-traveler-16-inch-laptop-backpack-tbb012us

    I usually have:

    • Laptop, power supply, cat6 cable, usb3 ethernet adapter for dual-homing, a couple of usb memory sticks.
    • High quality notepad, good pens, sticky notes, highlighters markers, whiteboard pens, presentation pointer.
    • Folders and a binder when needed. Books sometimes.
    • Earphones, earplugs, some medication like pain relievers.
    • When traveling I also put tickets, passport, money, keys etc in it. And water.


  • I use a leather satchel to/from work daily... when it's not mostly empty, I have my laptop in it, wallet, pen, papers, usb keys, maybe some loose change and letters.

    I also have my backpack with me (when I go to the gym before work), shoes, clothing, wash & grooming supplies, water, ymca card, bluetooth earbuds.



  • @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    I switched to backpacks many years ago.

    https://us.targus.com/products/checkpoint-friendly-air-traveler-16-inch-laptop-backpack-tbb012us

    I usually have:

    Laptop, power supply, cat6 cable, usb3 ethernet adapter for dual-homing, a couple of usb memory sticks.

    High quality notepad, good pens, sticky notes, highlighters markers, whiteboard pens, presentation pointer.

    Folders and a binder when needed. Books sometimes.

    Earphones, earplugs, some medication like pain relievers.

    When traveling I also put tickets, passport, money, keys etc in it. And water.

    Pretty much the same even the brand... + mint gum.



  • This reminds me of one of my favorite scenes in "Austin Powers" ... that's not my bag, baby!



  • Laptop, mouse, power cords, travel power adapter for 110v and USB, CAT6 cable, crossover cable, some books, an umbrella, a ham radio, tylenol and advil, some adapters, and other odds and ends.



  • Lets ta a look, right now I have:
    Work laptop, power supply, pen, mechanical pencil, good old yellow #2 pencil, notepad, spare laptop battery, usb power pack, usb phone cables (2) couple misc usb keys, usb to serial adapter and couple different console cables.
    I usually also carry my personal laptop, can of soup (never know in Buffalo when/where the snow will strand you) spare gloves, and a hat



  • Laptop, Battery for my cell phone that plugs into my backpack, usb to mini-usb cable, notebook, small toolset, two pens.



  • @aaronstuder laptop, net cable, powersupply, mouse, couple of in ears, some random papers, some flyers for advertising, business cards



  • One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?



  • Probably different for desktop tech who needs tools, but if you don't handle that kind of stuff, really a laptop is all you need



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    Probably different for desktop tech who needs tools, but if you don't handle that kind of stuff, really a laptop is all you need

    And a mouse, i hate touchpads. Plus charger, headphones, etc.



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    Probably different for desktop tech who needs tools, but if you don't handle that kind of stuff, really a laptop is all you need

    Often don't even need that. I bring one, typically, but not always.



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    For me, I'm only ever onsight if I'm there for meetings. Don't need a laptop distracting me if I'm talking to customers.



  • @obsolesce said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    Probably different for desktop tech who needs tools, but if you don't handle that kind of stuff, really a laptop is all you need

    And a mouse, i hate touchpads. Plus charger, headphones, etc.

    Can't argue the mouse. I. Can't stand touchpads either!



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁



  • @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁

    Using a net is much easier than fishing lures. With a net, you only need to find fish. Find bait fisherman needs to find and hook the fish. The sport fisherman needs to find, lure and hook in the fish.

    While fishing with a net yeilds the most numbers, obviously it doesn't translate to more pay. The highest paid fishermen are sport fishermen. Obviously the sponsored tournament guys are millionaires, but many local guys do quite well. Sport fishing charters often charge $700-1000 a day. We have about 100 of them just in our county. We are a big tourist area, but most areas have 10-20 of those guys in each area around The US. I know of many fishing guides and charters around the world as well.



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁

    Using a net is much easier than fishing lures. With a net, you only need to find fish. Find bait fisherman needs to find and hook the fish. The sport fisherman needs to find, lure and hook in the fish.

    While fishing with a net yeilds the most numbers, obviously it doesn't translate to more pay. The highest paid fishermen are sport fishermen. Obviously the sponsored tournament guys are millionaires, but many local guys do quite well. Sport fishing charters often charge $700-1000 a day. We have about 100 of them just in our county. We are a big tourist area, but most areas have 10-20 of those guys in each area around The US. I know of many fishing guides and charters around the world as well.

    I understand what you're saying - I have a friend that's really into fly fishing. But sports fishing is still small potatoes to the commercial fishing industry. They make billions.



  • @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁

    Using a net is much easier than fishing lures. With a net, you only need to find fish. Find bait fisherman needs to find and hook the fish. The sport fisherman needs to find, lure and hook in the fish.

    While fishing with a net yeilds the most numbers, obviously it doesn't translate to more pay. The highest paid fishermen are sport fishermen. Obviously the sponsored tournament guys are millionaires, but many local guys do quite well. Sport fishing charters often charge $700-1000 a day. We have about 100 of them just in our county. We are a big tourist area, but most areas have 10-20 of those guys in each area around The US. I know of many fishing guides and charters around the world as well.

    I understand what you're saying - I have a friend that's really into fly fishing. But sports fishing is still small potatoes to the commercial fishing industry. They make billions.

    Sport fishing has 110 billion dollar industry in just US.



  • Ok so. According to American Sportfishing Association in their report Sportfishing in America, it's $46 billion and accounts for $115 billion in total economic impact. When you consider travel and lodging associated with it.







  • @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    We are getting way OT here but...read it and weep.
    http://www.alaskafishradio.com/commercial-fishing-stomps-sport-sector-in-us-economy/

    You proved exactly what I said! Pay to job ratio is higher in your chart. I never said there was more money. You said commercial fishing has billions then I posted that recreational also has billions. I also mentioned pay was higher. Skill would be higher as it is more difficult and pays more.



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁

    Using a net is much easier than fishing lures. With a net, you only need to find fish. Find bait fisherman needs to find and hook the fish. The sport fisherman needs to find, lure and hook in the fish.

    While fishing with a net yeilds the most numbers, obviously it doesn't translate to more pay. The highest paid fishermen are sport fishermen. Obviously the sponsored tournament guys are millionaires, but many local guys do quite well. Sport fishing charters often charge $700-1000 a day. We have about 100 of them just in our county. We are a big tourist area, but most areas have 10-20 of those guys in each area around The US. I know of many fishing guides and charters around the world as well.

    Skill and pay is higher is all I said and you've proven that with your chart and article.



  • @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    @pete-s said in What's in your bag?:

    @irj said in What's in your bag?:

    One of the best ways to identify a veteran fisherman vs an inexperienced one is by the size of his tackle box. Less is more. The better fisherman I become the less lures I carry. It's the opposite of what most people think..

    What do you need other than a laptop to make connector whatever you need to access?

    That's pretty funny. Except that a real fisherman has a frickin' boat and nets. Tackle box is for amateurs. 😁

    Using a net is much easier than fishing lures. With a net, you only need to find fish. Find bait fisherman needs to find and hook the fish. The sport fisherman needs to find, lure and hook in the fish.

    While fishing with a net yeilds the most numbers, obviously it doesn't translate to more pay. The highest paid fishermen are sport fishermen. Obviously the sponsored tournament guys are millionaires, but many local guys do quite well. Sport fishing charters often charge $700-1000 a day. We have about 100 of them just in our county. We are a big tourist area, but most areas have 10-20 of those guys in each area around The US. I know of many fishing guides and charters around the world as well.

    I understand what you're saying - I have a friend that's really into fly fishing. But sports fishing is still small potatoes to the commercial fishing industry. They make billions.

    Sport fishing has 110 billion dollar industry in just US.

    That's like $300 per citizen (including babies, prisoners, etc.), per year. I have no idea what the fishing population is like, but the cost of sport fishing must be enormous. My own experience is that @irj is the only fisher I know, anywhere. Seems like the cost for fishing is huge.

    Even assuming as many as one out of ten people are avid fishers, and that seems extremely high, that's $3,000 to fish every year for life.


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