NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?



  • I've got an Asus RoG with an NVidia GeForce 960M GPU that has been working well for a few years. A couple days ago my wife noticed that there was an "overheating" message at some point, but she didn't take too careful note of it, so I am not exactly sure what it said. But we started to notice a few issues, and now realize, we think, that the GPU had died.

    What I know is that everything relying on the GPU stopped working and reverted to the awful Intel HD video system, which can't output audio over HDMI for one thing, and does a terrible job with the graphics.

    I tried uninstalling and reinstalling the NVidia drivers over and over again, but it seems to do nothing. In fact, on every run of the GeForce Experience, it makes you update the drivers again as if you didn't just do it. And the normal task bar NVidia tools have vanished.

    In the Windows device manager, there is error code 43 on the NVidia GPU. Which often means driver issues, but this seems unlikely here.

    NVidia has not released a new driver since late June. If these drivers did not work, it seems likely that they would have addressed that by now.

    Anyone have any ideas on how to fix it, or verify that it is broken?



  • Have you do any hardware diagnostics from ASUS ? I would try Ubuntu with the NVidia drivers and test it.



  • @dbeato said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Have you do any hardware diagnostics from ASUS ? I would try Ubuntu with the NVidia drivers and test it.

    NVidia drivers can't even install correctly, but this is a known issue with Windows 10 and GeForce that they sometimes have to reinstall with every reboot, so that doesn't tell us a whole lot.



  • If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?



  • @scottalanmiller @dbeato was suggesting to try on linux to see if there is a corruption on the os.
    Just before declaring the gpu dead



  • I'm taking backups of files (just so I don't have to spend days downloading them again) right now, then going to do a full reinstall on the machine and see what happens. Can't hurt at this point. Just in case there is a software issue somewhere.



  • @matteo-nunziati said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller @dbeato was suggesting to try on linux to see if there is a corruption on the os.
    Just before declaring the gpu dead

    No live CD that I can find will boot there. Tried that last night. I won't toss the machine, as there is an Intel HD GPU in there as well (useless for gaming, fine for desktop use). But I can't use Linux to test casually, it would be a full install blowing away the existing Windows install. So that's very last ditch effort. But I'm confident it can run Ubuntu at least (as we have an identical machine that runs Ubuntu smoothly.)



  • @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?

    It would be a thousand dollars to replace 😞



  • @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?

    It would be a thousand dollars to replace 😞

    😠 Worth the time an pain to replace some thermal grease then I'd think!



  • @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?

    It would be a thousand dollars to replace 😞

    😠 Worth the time an pain to replace some thermal grease then I'd think!

    I doubt you can remove the embedded chipset.



  • @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?

    It would be a thousand dollars to replace 😞

    😠 Worth the time an pain to replace some thermal grease then I'd think!

    I doubt you can remove the embedded chipset.

    No, but you shoule be able to remove the heat-sink, clean off the thermal grease, and replace the heat-sink with new thermal grease. Cleaning the GPU can be harder as they don't have a heat spreader and you can easily damage the GPU or components.



  • @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @travisdh1 said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    If you've been through the normal driver troubleshooting, and a thorough dusting, then the only thing left to try is removing the heatsink, and applying fresh thermal paste.

    The question is, how much time do you want to spend attempting to fix it rather than just replacing the thing?

    It would be a thousand dollars to replace 😞

    😠 Worth the time an pain to replace some thermal grease then I'd think!

    I doubt you can remove the embedded chipset.

    No, but you shoule be able to remove the heat-sink, clean off the thermal grease, and replace the heat-sink with new thermal grease. Cleaning the GPU can be harder as they don't have a heat spreader and you can easily damage the GPU or components.

    GPU is the issue.



  • I did this to my Asus Laptop with an NVIDIA 750M chipset a couple of months ago. I saw about a 10 degreee (C) improvement in mine. But I had to take my whole laptop completely apart and put it back together again.

    Edit: Those who know me know that it is a miracle my laptop still works at all, lol.



  • @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    I've got an Asus RoG with an NVidia GeForce 960M GPU that has been working well for a few years. A couple days ago my wife noticed that there was an "overheating" message at some point, but she didn't take too careful note of it, so I am not exactly sure what it said. But we started to notice a few issues, and now realize, we think, that the GPU had died.

    What I know is that everything relying on the GPU stopped working and reverted to the awful Intel HD video system, which can't output audio over HDMI for one thing, and does a terrible job with the graphics.

    I tried uninstalling and reinstalling the NVidia drivers over and over again, but it seems to do nothing. In fact, on every run of the GeForce Experience, it makes you update the drivers again as if you didn't just do it. And the normal task bar NVidia tools have vanished.

    In the Windows device manager, there is error code 43 on the NVidia GPU. Which often means driver issues, but this seems unlikely here.

    NVidia has not released a new driver since late June. If these drivers did not work, it seems likely that they would have addressed that by now.

    Anyone have any ideas on how to fix it, or verify that it is broken?

    Linux isn't officially supported on those, so just to be 100% sure the GPU is dead, I'd install Win10 just real quick on an external USB drive or something, making sure to install all drivers directly from ASUS including the Nvidia graphics drivers. If it's still dead, call them to see if they'll replace it, if not... replace it yourself or buy a System76.



  • Dunno if this will help or not, but Guru3d's download section used to have some decent tools for graphics cards
    Honestly, I haven't checked in quite a while.



  • @obsolesce said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    I've got an Asus RoG with an NVidia GeForce 960M GPU that has been working well for a few years. A couple days ago my wife noticed that there was an "overheating" message at some point, but she didn't take too careful note of it, so I am not exactly sure what it said. But we started to notice a few issues, and now realize, we think, that the GPU had died.

    What I know is that everything relying on the GPU stopped working and reverted to the awful Intel HD video system, which can't output audio over HDMI for one thing, and does a terrible job with the graphics.

    I tried uninstalling and reinstalling the NVidia drivers over and over again, but it seems to do nothing. In fact, on every run of the GeForce Experience, it makes you update the drivers again as if you didn't just do it. And the normal task bar NVidia tools have vanished.

    In the Windows device manager, there is error code 43 on the NVidia GPU. Which often means driver issues, but this seems unlikely here.

    NVidia has not released a new driver since late June. If these drivers did not work, it seems likely that they would have addressed that by now.

    Anyone have any ideas on how to fix it, or verify that it is broken?

    Linux isn't officially supported on those, so just to be 100% sure the GPU is dead, I'd install Win10 just real quick on an external USB drive or something, making sure to install all drivers directly from ASUS including the Nvidia graphics drivers. If it's still dead, call them to see if they'll replace it, if not... replace it yourself or buy a System76.

    Not officially supported, but runs better than Windows 10 on them regardless. Official support is kinda worthless, what actually works is far more important.

    Fedora doesn't run there from what I can tell (same as a few years ago.) But Ubuntu runs flawlessly and actually fixes things that were flaky under Windows. Managed to get it to that last night. Since the GPU is toast, Windows has zero value on there.



  • @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Not officially supported, but runs better than Windows 10 on them regardless. Official support is kinda worthless, what actually works is far more important.
    Fedora doesn't run there from what I can tell (same as a few years ago.) But Ubuntu runs flawlessly and actually fixes things that were flaky under Windows.

    This has been the complete opposite of my experience when trying Ubuntu (and others) on my Asus ROG. Nothing runs stable except Windows 10.

    I've tried Ubuntu sever times over the years, each time hoping for a good result, but getting weird issues after an install, and also during a live boot, as well as after supposedly good driver installs.



  • @obsolesce said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Not officially supported, but runs better than Windows 10 on them regardless. Official support is kinda worthless, what actually works is far more important.
    Fedora doesn't run there from what I can tell (same as a few years ago.) But Ubuntu runs flawlessly and actually fixes things that were flaky under Windows.

    This has been the complete opposite of my experience when trying Ubuntu (and others) on my Asus ROG. Nothing runs stable except Windows 10.

    I've tried Ubuntu sever times over the years, each time hoping for a good result, but getting weird issues after an install, and also during a live boot, as well as after supposedly good driver installs.

    I've got two RoGs. The Windows installs have always been flaky, the Ubuntus (once finally installed) have been solid.



  • @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Since the GPU is toast, Windows has zero value on there.

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    In the Windows device manager, there is error code 43 on the NVidia GPU. Which often means driver issues, but this seems unlikely here.

    I must have missed this when I originally read it... I was under the assumption you had Ubuntu running, but this tells me Windows is on it.



  • @obsolesce said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Since the GPU is toast, Windows has zero value on there.

    @scottalanmiller said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    In the Windows device manager, there is error code 43 on the NVidia GPU. Which often means driver issues, but this seems unlikely here.

    I must have missed this when I originally read it... I was under the assumption you had Ubuntu running, but this tells me Windows is on it.

    Had Windows, because it was a gaming rig. But without the GPU, Windows has no purpose there.



  • @scottalanmiller

    Blowing compressed air through the fan could help with the cooling.

    I've seen some motherboards where the graphics adapter sits on a separate card because the same machine is sold in different configurations. Hit ebay for used graphics cards.



  • Usually if it's heat related, you can get it to boot and work until it warms up, and then it fails. As @Pete-S said, blowing compressed air over it continuously would solve the heat issue if there is one.



  • @mike-davis said in NVidia Graphics Card on the Fritz?:

    Usually if it's heat related, you can get it to boot and work until it warms up, and then it fails. As @Pete-S said, blowing compressed air over it continuously would solve the heat issue if there is one.

    That's what I was thinking. This is dead from moment go.



  • If the laptop isn't worth much to you without the NVidia, you can Google "laptop oven reflow"
    http://www.computerrepairtips.net/how-to-reflow-a-laptop-motherboard/

    If it does serve some purpose with the built in Intel video, you may not want to try that....


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