Mobile Payments



  • Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?



  • I've used Apple Pay, it is more secure, a bank issues an additional card number that only works with your particular device.



  • Had android pay set up but only used it few times, then never bothered. guess I find it easier to just use a small bit of plastic instead of getting my phone out, unlocking it, selecting the card etc.


  • Service Provider

    @hobbit666 said in Mobile Payments:

    Had android pay set up but only used it few times, then never bothered. guess I find it easier to just use a small bit of plastic instead of getting my phone out, unlocking it, selecting the card etc.

    With iPhone ApplePay can be setup to work from the lock screen on only require your TouchID. It is super convenient. Additionally with the Apple watch, I don't even need to get my phone out of my pocket.

    I am sure android devices should be able to be setup similar.


  • Service Provider

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.



  • The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.


  • Service Provider

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    That is not how any of that works.



  • @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    That is not how any of that works.

    That's part of why I wanted to start this conversation was to eliminate any misconceptions out there. My understanding was that they do not store your credit card number but store randomized tokens. Every time you make a payment, it gives the terminal a new, random token linked to your card so that if Target gets hacked, all they have from you is a random token that is no longer valid or linked to your card.

    In addition, if your device were to get stolen or lost, you could disable access I believe from a web portal based on which service you use. If you're using fingerprint authentication like @JaredBusch stated with Apple Pay, then no one could make a transaction anyway.

    I feel like this is something I want to try out, just looking to dispel any myths and get all my information before jumping in.



  • @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?


  • Service Provider

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.



  • @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.



  • I haven't started using one of the options yet. I have been curious but I hear mixed reports, so I'm trying to learn more about this too.



  • @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.

    It's my understanding of the Walmart app that you can scan your stuff and pay with the app without having to go through the lines. Anybody know if that's right or not?



  • @dafyre said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.

    It's my understanding of the Walmart app that you can scan your stuff and pay with the app without having to go through the lines. Anybody know if that's right or not?

    I know Amazon was doing something like this at some of their smaller stores before they acquired Whole Foods. Not sure if they've implemented it on a larger scale though or if Wal-Mart has picked this up.

    Wal-Mart does however have the ability to order your groceries online or from their app and schedule a pick up time. Then you just pull up and they load them into your vehicle and payment is processed through the app. My wife has used that twice and loves it. Beats grocery shopping with a 1 year old.



  • @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @dafyre said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.

    It's my understanding of the Walmart app that you can scan your stuff and pay with the app without having to go through the lines. Anybody know if that's right or not?

    I know Amazon was doing something like this at some of their smaller stores before they acquired Whole Foods. Not sure if they've implemented it on a larger scale though or if Wal-Mart has picked this up.

    Wal-Mart does however have the ability to order your groceries online or from their app and schedule a pick up time. Then you just pull up and they load them into your vehicle and payment is processed through the app. My wife has used that twice and loves it. Beats grocery shopping with a 1 year old.

    Most of the grocery chains around here do this. You can order your groceries then park at a specific spot. They ask what your order number is and someone runs it out to you. It's really convenient and only a slight upcharge.



  • @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.

    If they tie it directly into your bank like Target does with the Target Debit card, they can skip the CC fees. That's huge!



  • @coliver said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @dafyre said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    Haha yes I do. I initially interpreted what you were saying though to mean it will be huge in comparison to Apple Pay, Android Pay, etc from a competitive standpoint. Yes it may be huge in scale due to the number of customers, but what benefit would it bring Wal-Mart outside of what they can already get from mobile ordering within their app? They get the purchase data whether you use their payment platform or not.

    It's my understanding of the Walmart app that you can scan your stuff and pay with the app without having to go through the lines. Anybody know if that's right or not?

    I know Amazon was doing something like this at some of their smaller stores before they acquired Whole Foods. Not sure if they've implemented it on a larger scale though or if Wal-Mart has picked this up.

    Wal-Mart does however have the ability to order your groceries online or from their app and schedule a pick up time. Then you just pull up and they load them into your vehicle and payment is processed through the app. My wife has used that twice and loves it. Beats grocery shopping with a 1 year old.

    Most of the grocery chains around here do this. You can order your groceries then park at a specific spot. They ask what your order number is and someone runs it out to you. It's really convenient and only a slight upcharge.

    Around here, if you order $50 or more, no fee.



  • I used ISIS several years ago before they changed the name of that mobile payment platform.

    I was one of the first to ever use it at the McD's around here - the cashier was kinda freaked out by it..

    As mentioned due to the hassle of pulling out a phone, not any harder/easier than pulling out a CC from wallet - so no clue if mobile payments are getting any real traction.



  • @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    @jaredbusch said in Mobile Payments:

    @zachary715 said in Mobile Payments:

    Mobile payments aren't a new thing. They've been around a few years and it seems like now everyone has their own mobile payment platform. I think the three strongest players in this game are Apply Pay, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay. There's also Paypal and the like, but I'm talking mostly about storing credit card info in your phone and paying through an NFC terminal.

    I've always wanted to try these (Android Pay) but for some reason have been reluctant. The more I've read lately, it seems that in reality these can be more secure than regular credit card payments using the new chip reader.

    My question to you all is have you used before or do you currently use some form of mobile payment solution? If so, which one and why? What has been your experiences? What needs to be improved? Do you find that mobile payments are more secure than regular credit card transaction at a chip or swipe terminal?

    Do not forget that Walmart is setting up their own thing. That will be huge also.

    How will it be huge? Will it only be usable at Wal-Mart stores? What benefits might it bring from using their mobile payment platform outside of a Wal-Mart store?

    Do you realize how many people shop in walmart every day?

    It never has to work outside of Walmart to be huge.

    @JaredBusch is right. Take this into consideration:
    Total amount of money spent at Wal-Mart every hour of every day $36,750,000 (source:http://www.statisticbrain.com/wal-mart-company-statistics/)

    That is on the hour. That is roughly 880 Million in one day. Walmart wouldn't need much to meet or exceed Apple in money or transactions. Especially if Wal-Mart opens it up to other smaller retailers. Gross sales in the App Store was $30 Billion in 2016 (Source:https://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckjones/2017/01/06/apples-app-store-generating-meaningful-revenue/#4a4147531eb6). Apple doesn't disclose details about Apple pay transaction, at least I couldn't find it quickly. However, it is plain to see Wal-Mart could easily become the dominant player in the market quickly.


  • Service Provider

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.



  • I really love the idea of mobile payments, assuming they do it right, and each transaction is done via a secure onetime code generated on the fly. As already mentioned in this thread, this would make hacking Target or anyone useless from a stolen payment POV.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.


  • Service Provider

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    I felt the same way about PP.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?


  • Service Provider

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?

    The law, business logic, the technology. You can't serously be worried about the people most likely to protect you. If you are worried about them, then you are stuck with cash. These are THE people to go to for security. It's beyond irrational to think that there is any risk there. They are not from whom you need protected. You are protected by the market, there is no value to them stealing from you, only value in them protecting you.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?

    The law, business logic, the technology. You can't serously be worried about the people most likely to protect you. If you are worried about them, then you are stuck with cash. These are THE people to go to for security. It's beyond irrational to think that there is any risk there. They are not from whom you need protected. You are protected by the market, there is no value to them stealing from you, only value in them protecting you.

    Can't plus this enough.

    It's really sad that the banks didn't come up with this rock solid technology themselves - I can't see how it wouldn't save them billions on stolen CC charges, etc - but alas they didn't give a crap.. so others, like Apple and Google have stepped.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?

    The law, business logic, the technology. You can't serously be worried about the people most likely to protect you. If you are worried about them, then you are stuck with cash. These are THE people to go to for security. It's beyond irrational to think that there is any risk there. They are not from whom you need protected. You are protected by the market, there is no value to them stealing from you, only value in them protecting you.

    I see where you are coming from, but does this logic apply to the whole ecosystem of a particular company, such as Google/Apple? Would you gladly install Google Home or a Nest thermostat with that same logic?

    I am not making a point here but just wanting to see how far this trust goes.


  • Service Provider

    @dashrender said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?

    The law, business logic, the technology. You can't serously be worried about the people most likely to protect you. If you are worried about them, then you are stuck with cash. These are THE people to go to for security. It's beyond irrational to think that there is any risk there. They are not from whom you need protected. You are protected by the market, there is no value to them stealing from you, only value in them protecting you.

    Can't plus this enough.

    It's really sad that the banks didn't come up with this rock solid technology themselves - I can't see how it wouldn't save them billions on stolen CC charges, etc - but alas they didn't give a crap.. so others, like Apple and Google have stepped.

    Banks don't make devices, it wasn't the banks place to do it, really. It's too costly for a bank to do, not worth it to them.


  • Service Provider

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    @scottalanmiller said in Mobile Payments:

    @nerdydad said in Mobile Payments:

    The paranoid person in me is screaming no because I'd be storing my card information onto a device that I only half way trust.

    The bank already stores all of that.

    Yes they do, because they are the ones that issued the card to me.

    Unless this is audited by a 3rd party and is shown as secure, I wouldn't know if I could trust it or not. We're talking a lot about convenience here and some about security/privacy.

    No, we are specifically talking about security. Mobile payments from someone like Apple who does way more security and is way more well known for security and has way more security reputation on the line is the key selling point.

    But what would protect me from Apple/Google in this case?

    The law, business logic, the technology. You can't serously be worried about the people most likely to protect you. If you are worried about them, then you are stuck with cash. These are THE people to go to for security. It's beyond irrational to think that there is any risk there. They are not from whom you need protected. You are protected by the market, there is no value to them stealing from you, only value in them protecting you.

    I see where you are coming from, but does this logic apply to the whole ecosystem of a particular company, such as Google/Apple? Would you gladly install Google Home or a Nest thermostat with that same logic?

    I am not making a point here but just wanting to see how far this trust goes.

    I totally trust a Google Home device to not solice and steal my banking data, if that is what you just asked.