Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna



  • Hi Gurus,

    Is there a way to build a receiving antenna for the island DSL that can withstand Category 5 Hurricane wind? Our antennas for DSL are all gone after Irma. Only left standing is the cement walls. Roof, antenna and equipment are gone. What are my options to minimize expense and faster service recovery after Category 5 Hurricane?

    I cannot control the ISP sending antenna side but I'm hoping to improve the island receiving end to reduce headache if possible.



  • Is putting the antenna inside 3 cement walls, cement roof with metal shutters in front (to be closed during a strong hurricane) viable? Just fishing for the idea here.



  • So, first of all, DSL works off of POTS lines and needs copper, it doesn't go wireless. I'm guessing you are using microwaves or wifi for backhaul?

    Next, since you mentioned a wall and not a tower, I assume the wall is where you are mounting this equipment, correct? If so, bear in mind that a cat 5 hurricane is 154+ mph winds. If I have a cat 5 coming in, then I would just go ahead and prepare my backup equipment to replace the equipment that I'm about to lose. Then call the insurance company for a claim or just write off the old equipment as a loss and buy new replacement equipment.

    You're probably going to spend just as much for an engineer to hopefully design you a rig that can withstand that much wind.



  • Were you using a omni direction or dish antenna? where was it on the building? Do you have any photos of your setup pre-Irma?

    As a reference, here is an article about Puerto Rico NEXRAD and energy farm(s)



  • @nerdydad said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    You're probably going to spend just as much for an engineer to hopefully design you a rig that can withstand that much wind.

    Not to mention the debris that is likely hitting the wall and antenna.



  • Also what good does internet do if you don't have power? Sure the antenna may be intact and able to receive a signal. But it doesn't mean you have power or networking equipment, or even anyone who needs internet that quickly.

    Might be better off just building an underground bunker and dealing with staying alive rather than this tasks.



  • What about mounting the equipment so it's easy to take down?

    So when a Cat 5 is heading your way, take the stuff down store it and put it back up and off you go?



  • I get that internet is important to be able to get back to normal. But a CAT 5 hurricane is not something to trifle with. The order of concern should be

    Shelter : food & water : power : everything else



  • @hobbit666 said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    What about mounting the equipment so it's easy to take down?

    So when a Cat 5 is heading your way, take the stuff down store it and put it back up and off you go?

    Without knowing more information from the OP in regards to the structure, I couldn't make anymore recommendations.



  • @NerdyDad is right. This is an IT Risk Management issue. You need to figure out your Annual Loss Expectancy (ALE). You can get the ALE by multiplying Single Loss Expectency (SLE) times Annual Rate of Occurrence (ARO).

    So if your area gets a major hurricane once every 10 years. You would calculate the SLE x ARO. For simplicity, let's say your company lost $100,000 in equipment during Irma. You would multiple $100,000 x .10 (ARO). That would give you a ALE of $10k.

    Now you need to figure out how to handle the risk. Are controls such as walls that cost $1M worth the investment? you can see that it would take 100 years to break even with that control. Many times transferring the risk over to insurance is the best option.



  • @nerdydad said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    So, first of all, DSL works off of POTS lines and needs copper, it doesn't go wireless. I'm guessing you are using microwaves or wifi for backhaul?

    Perhaps it's DSL like service emulated over some form of wireless backhaul. Kinda like how you can get PRIs over IP now days. That's my only guess.



  • @anthonyh said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    @nerdydad said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    So, first of all, DSL works off of POTS lines and needs copper, it doesn't go wireless. I'm guessing you are using microwaves or wifi for backhaul?

    Perhaps it's DSL like service emulated over some form of wireless backhaul. Kinda like how you can get PRIs over IP now days. That's my only guess.

    Maybe? I don't really know. He didn't expand on that point.



  • @irj said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    @NerdyDad is right. This is an IT Risk Management issue. You need to figure out your Annual Loss Expectancy (ALE).

    Thread jack:

    0_1507824397341_2f966d00-252e-43f2-9688-dd2b7e645ce6-image.png

    Returning to thread -



  • In an attempt to post something helpful...

    We have a few wireless links in our WAN topology using Ubiquiti AirFiber radios. When we planned our deployment, we budgeted to have two spare radios on hand in the event we had a failure of some sort. Perhaps it's as simple as having a spare set stored somewhere safe (not likely to be swept away by a hurricane) so that you can re-deploy as soon as the storm passes?



  • Instead of trying Hurricane Proof the antenna which I don't think you will especially like a Cat 5 storm. Why not make it where you can disassemble the antenna and parts and then put them somewhere safe. So you then can put them up after the storm again? I think that has a better chance.

    @hobbit666 beat me to this idea. I think he hit it on the head though.



  • I agree with making it portable.

    You can see hurricanes coming days in advance. Take it apart and put it away.

    Personally, since CAT 5 is total destruction, the antenna would be closer to the bottom of the list of things I care about.



  • @tim_g said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    I agree with making it portable.

    You can see hurricanes coming days in advance. Take it apart and put it away.

    Personally, since CAT 5 is total destruction, the antenna would be closer to the bottom of the list of things I care about.

    I agree. CAT 5 to me is what it is like when EF5 tornado hits (I live in Tornado Alley). My work has employees who lived in Joplin when it was hit. When something like that hits then I am sorry but I could care less about a damn antenna and who has internet.



  • @hobbit666 said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    What about mounting the equipment so it's easy to take down?

    So when a Cat 5 is heading your way, take the stuff down store it and put it back up and off you go?

    @penguinwrangler said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    Instead of trying Hurricane Proof the antenna which I don't think you will especially like a Cat 5 storm. Why not make it where you can disassemble the antenna and parts and then put them somewhere safe. So you then can put them up after the storm again? I think that has a better chance.

    This is likely the best plan as hurricanes are typically predicted, most of the time days ahead of time. Taking them down to a storm shelter might be your best bet. Spares and insurance should also be items after that, just in case.



  • @gjacobse said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    @irj said in Category 5 Hurricane DSL Antenna:

    @NerdyDad is right. This is an IT Risk Management issue. You need to figure out your Annual Loss Expectancy (ALE).

    Thread jack:

    0_1507824397341_2f966d00-252e-43f2-9688-dd2b7e645ce6-image.png

    Returning to thread -

    How is cost and benefit not important to this thread? Financially it's the only thing that makes sense


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