New Chromebook Lineup Heralds Bright Future



  • New third party Chromebook products have been coming out recently and these new generation products really allow businesses considering the Google Chrome ecosystem to take it seriously like never before. From all in one unit to desktops to awesome eight core ARM laptops, check out where Chrome is going....

    http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/devices/chromebooks.html#ss2

    http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/devices/chromebooks.html#asus-chromebox

    http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/devices/chromebooks.html#lg-chromebase



  • Is the chromebook the introduction of the masses to Linux? I'm still kind of shocked that Ubuntu laptops aren't sold in the US other than by Dell for special order.



  • @RAM. said:

    Is the chromebook the introduction of the masses to Linux? I'm still kind of shocked that Ubuntu laptops aren't sold in the US other than by Dell for special order.

    Even as a hard core Linux guy Ubuntu machines make little sense to me. Mint or Suse would make more sense first.



  • Chromebooks are Linux like Android is Linux. Embedded. So it doesn't really expose people to Linux meaningfully.



  • I'm still lobbying my wife to let me get the HP 14" model.



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    I'm still lobbying my wife to let me get the HP 14" model.

    It looks great. But the Samsung octo core is calling my name.



  • @scottalanmiller I've already started groveling @samsungtweets for one 🙂



  • Ha ha. Since my daughter uses a Chromebook. Getting another shouldn't be a problem.



  • That nre Samsung looks really nice. I saw one recently. Really nice design.



  • I'm tempted to get one of the little desktop machines. So tiny and cheap.



  • I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂



  • @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).



  • @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    If you are Google Apps based, how can you justify anything else? So cheap and good.



  • @ITcrackerjack said:

    @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).

    If you don't have legacy non-web systems, you'd need something else. But if you are modernized they are perfect.



  • Office 366, for example, works quite well on a Chromebook.



  • Can you fully install Office Pro Plus now? When I had a chrome book previously I could not install anything. Not having Outlook on a desktop is a no go for me.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).

    If you don't have legacy non-web systems, you'd need something else. But if you are modernized they are perfect.

    Whoa. I'm trying to wrap my brain around this statement and I'm failing. Can you word that different for me? <scratching head>



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    Can you fully install Office Pro Plus now? When I had a chrome book previously I could not install anything. Not having Outlook on a desktop is a no go for me.

    No, you can't. Only apps from the Chrome web store will work. You need to untie yourself from Outlook! 😛



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    Can you fully install Office Pro Plus now? When I had a chrome book previously I could not install anything. Not having Outlook on a desktop is a no go for me.

    There is no "install" to a Chromebook. The point of a Chomebook is to be a browser. The moment you could install something it would become "just Linux".



  • Yeah unting myself from outlook would cost me time and efficiency. Not gonna get me to move there. Using the plug ins for CRM saves me so much time. Can't do the via OWA. The idea of the chromebook is a great one. Just for the Management side of things would just cost me time to only be web based for some things. Not having Excel installed locally and Word locally would make typing contracts and doing accounting work cumbersome. Can I do those via the web apps yes but at the cost of efficiency it makes it not worth it at all.



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    Yeah unting myself from outlook would cost me time and efficiency. Not gonna get me to move there. Using the plug ins for CRM saves me so much time. Can't do the via OWA. The idea of the chromebook is a great one. Just for the Management side of things would just cost me time to only be web based for some things. Not having Excel installed locally and Word locally would make typing contracts and doing accounting work cumbersome. Can I do those via the web apps yes but at the cost of efficiency it makes it not worth it at all.

    Yeah, I get that!



  • @ITcrackerjack said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).

    If you don't have legacy non-web systems, you'd need something else. But if you are modernized they are perfect.

    Whoa. I'm trying to wrap my brain around this statement and I'm failing. Can you word that different for me? <scratching head>

    Chromebooks are built for the modern app world. Modern app design is web based. Exceptions exist of course but very few and only extremely niche. It is a very rare company needing anything locally installed today. And less everyday. Companies need that only because of old apps that they keep running, bad choices or niche needs.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).

    If you don't have legacy non-web systems, you'd need something else. But if you are modernized they are perfect.

    Whoa. I'm trying to wrap my brain around this statement and I'm failing. Can you word that different for me? <scratching head>

    Chromebooks are built for the modern app world. Modern app design is web based. Exceptions exist of course but very few and only extremely niche. It is a very rare company needing anything locally installed today. And less everyday. Companies need that only because of old apps that they keep running, bad choices or niche needs.

    That's what I thought you were saying. Double negatives often just confuse me. 😕



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @ITcrackerjack said:

    @Gabi said:

    I use gmail quite a bit.

    Our business email infrastructure is on google apps too.

    I haven't used any of the chrome books but I'm finding it hard to justify one.

    How do these live in your workflow? Do you use these for business?

    🙂

    I think it would be hard to justify in a business environment, unless you are already tightly integrated into the Google ecosystem. I see these getting into the education niche. Maybe using them in a lab environment when a full Windows desktop isn't needed (and where it is, use these as a thin client into an RDS). The other use case I see is for sales people on the road (again, who are tied to the Google ecosystem) or university students (I would have loved one while in Uni).

    If you don't have legacy non-web systems, you'd need something else. But if you are modernized they are perfect.

    Whoa. I'm trying to wrap my brain around this statement and I'm failing. Can you word that different for me? <scratching head>

    Chromebooks are built for the modern app world. Modern app design is web based. Exceptions exist of course but very few and only extremely niche. It is a very rare company needing anything locally installed today. And less everyday. Companies need that only because of old apps that they keep running, bad choices or niche needs.

    Almost any modern company that deals with physical items has local needs of one sort or another. Examples would include manufacturing, distribution, utilities, and healthcare companies have local needs. Companies dealing with the abstract, such as real estate, finance, and insurance would have a better time going web-based.



  • Maybe one day the Outlook web app will be as good as the desktop app.



  • That would be awesome but for now I HAVE to have outlook installed



  • @technobabble said:

    Maybe one day the Outlook web app will be as good as the desktop app.

    For many users, it is already better. @Dominica and I have both switched over to OWA.



  • Once they add a way to view unread messages that will be close enough for me to use OWA.