What am I missing here (Exchange 2010 on server 2012r2)



  • Hey guys.

    I feel like I'm missing something really stupid.

    Just installed Exchange 2010 on a Server 2012r2 box (more for messing around than anything)

    I've installed before, so I feel like I just missed a stupid step but cant seem to find my mistake.

    After fresh install I essentially cant expand to see any of my options, anyone know which direction to point me in minus re-doing it from step 1

    Thanks

    0_1455645011592_Exchange.JPG



  • I thought Exchange had to be at a specific SP before it would work on 2012(r2). Are you on such SP?



  • @Dashrender
    Definitely not up to date, I'll start updating right now thanks.



  • Any reason you're using a three version old copy of Exchange?



  • @Dashrender
    Haha not really no, best answer I can honestly give you.... I had the ISO downloaded already.

    Guess this is the kick in the butt I needed to download a new ISO



  • Test environment?

    yeah I would never start with something so old.. maybe go with Exchange 2013, but even that.. nah.. 2016 has been our for 6 or so months..



  • I think you need upgrade Exchange 2010 to SP3 RU5 to execute it in W2012R2



  • @iroal
    Ya I ended up upgrading which just honestly screwed everything up.
    Had to manually go in and remove the database, so that I could uninstall, so that I could start installing 2013....gah



  • @Dashrender
    2016 eh...hmm dont know if I'm ready to take that jump =/
    But ya, gonna jump on the 2013 board atleast, I'll think about 2016

    Thanks



  • What's to be worried about with 2016?



  • @Dashrender

    Personally find 2013 a pain vs 2010 so I can only assume (having looked into it less than 3 minutes) that its less GUI and more powershell, which honestly I'm not the hugest fan of.



  • That may be true, but it's also the future.

    I'm currently still on 2010 and need to move. I plan to push to O365 this summer, so I'll have to get used to that one way or the other.



  • @Sparkum 2013 uses a web based gui now. Of course you can do everything with powershell as well.



  • @Dashrender

    Haha ya good point.

    We actually went the opposite route at work and pulled out of O365 after about a year.



  • @brianlittlejohn
    Ya for sure there is still a gui, you can just do less in the gui in 2013 vs 2010



  • @Dashrender said:

    That may be true, but it's also the future.

    I'm currently still on 2010 and need to move. I plan to push to O365 this summer, so I'll have to get used to that one way or the other.

    I'm in the same position. Doing research on cloud based services, software based VPN w/ Azure, O365, ODFB and maybe bitium for SSO or something. I still don't know a lot just in general so I'm trying to study about it but I'm going through a masters program right now in addition to working full time.



  • @Sparkum said:

    @Dashrender

    Haha ya good point.

    We actually went the opposite route at work and pulled out of O365 after about a year.

    How come?



  • @Dashrender

    Honestly it just 100% came down to price,

    We only had a small portion of users on O365 (20-30 if I remember) and IMO we probably chose the wrong plan for how we operate.

    But the simpe math of $12.50 * 30 = $375/month (Not sure if that was the exact pricing just googled in quickly) * 12 =$4500/year

    Just didnt seem worth it to us.

    If we had done the $5 plan maybe, but for what we are doing in house works just fine.



  • @Sparkum said:

    @Dashrender

    Honestly it just 100% came down to price,

    We only had a small portion of users on O365 (20-30 if I remember) and IMO we probably chose the wrong plan for how we operate.

    But the simpe math of $12.50 * 30 = $375/month (Not sure if that was the exact pricing just googled in quickly) * 12 =$4500/year

    Just didnt seem worth it to us.

    If we had done the $5 plan maybe, but for what we are doing in house works just fine.

    Even if you calculate the cost the server and the man hours you dedicate to maintain it?



  • @wirestyle22

    Server already existed so its a blind cost (sort of speaking) we just added another virtual, and honestly we haven't touched it since it went into production.
    Other than adding a user here or there, but we would be doing the same process with O365 as we would in house for that

    So I would say as of today we are definitely ahead.



  • @Sparkum said:

    @wirestyle22

    Server already existed so its a blind cost (sort of speaking) we just added another virtual, and honestly we haven't touched it since it went into production.
    Other than adding a user here or there, but we would be doing the same process with O365 as we would in house for that

    So I would say as of today we are definitely ahead.

    You do need to perform refreshes though which is an added cost every few years. Also, you will eventually run into problems and need to perform maintenance. These are all costs. You are doing that instead of something else beneficial to the company, you know what I mean?



  • @wirestyle22
    Ya 100%

    But to be completely blunt with you, the higher ups see the invoice plain and simple.

    They don't see what we do day in and day out.



  • @Sparkum said:

    @wirestyle22
    Ya 100%

    But to be completely blunt with you, the higher ups see the invoice plain and simple.

    They don't see what we do day in and day out.

    That's unfortunate. I understand. I'm in the same position here at my company. It won't stop me from fighting to do things the right way and eventually make myself obsolete--which is essentially what I'm doing. They will most likely have someone working here per diem.


  • Service Provider

    While I do prefer to move Exchange out, it is not a clear cut simple answer. Even considering all costs.

    The biggest mistake people make when it comes to discussing Office 365 is lumping all the services and costs into one thing.

    Instead, you need to determine what parts of the puzzle are needed.

    Exchange Online Plan 1: $4 per user per month (Exchange).
    Office 365 Business Essentials: $5 per user per month (Exchange, ODfB, and SfB).
    Office 365 Business: $8 per user per month (Desktop Office apps and ODfB).
    Office 365 Business Premium: $12.50 per user per month (Exchange, ODfB, SfB, Desktop Office apps).

    If you are only discussing the need for Exchange, then you should be looking at $4 per user per month or $48 per user per year.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    While I do prefer to move Exchange out, it is not a clear cut simple answer. Even considering all costs.

    The biggest mistake people make when it comes to discussing Office 365 is lumping all the services and costs into one thing.

    Instead, you need to determine what parts of the puzzle are needed.

    Exchange Online Plan 1: $4 per user per month (Exchange).
    Office 365 Business Essentials: $5 per user per month (Exchange, ODfB, and SfB).
    Office 365 Business: $8 per user per month (Desktop Office apps and ODfB).
    Office 365 Business Premium: $12.50 per user per month (Exchange, ODfB, SfB, Desktop Office apps).

    If you are only discussing the need for Exchange, then you should be looking at $4 per user per month or $48 per user per year.

    Isn't moving to O365 going to be necessary at some point though anyway? Isn't this where technology is going? I'm asking because I honestly don't know.


  • Service Provider

    @wirestyle22 said:

    Isn't moving to O365 going to be necessary at some point though anyway? Isn't this where technology is going? I'm asking because I honestly don't know.

    It's where most things are headed, yes. Necessary might be a strong way to think of it. But the trend is and has been that directly very rapidly.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @wirestyle22 said:

    Isn't moving to O365 going to be necessary at some point though anyway? Isn't this where technology is going? I'm asking because I honestly don't know.

    It's where most things are headed, yes. Necessary might be a strong way to think of it. But the trend is and has been that directly very rapidly.

    Thank you.

    I strongly word it because my understanding is that LAN won't be as supported as it is today in the future. How far away that is, I have no idea.


  • Service Provider

    @wirestyle22 said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @wirestyle22 said:

    Isn't moving to O365 going to be necessary at some point though anyway? Isn't this where technology is going? I'm asking because I honestly don't know.

    It's where most things are headed, yes. Necessary might be a strong way to think of it. But the trend is and has been that directly very rapidly.

    Thank you.

    I strongly word it because my understanding is that LAN won't be as supported as it is today in the future. How far away that is, I have no idea.

    Even if you have a traditional LAN, it doesn't mean your Exchange would be treated as a LAN resource, though. Email is inherently LANless by design of being a network to network communications platform.



  • @JaredBusch

    100% and I even stated below I think we chose the wrong plan for our company.
    So while we paid $4k/year we were also licensing 20-30 users with Office 2013 but again, hidden costs.

    Ya, I think if we had gone 43012 = $1440 there would have been a greater chance of us keeping it.
    But in the realm of eventually putting lets say 200 people on it, I feel it was an idea that would have died in our organization



  • @wirestyle22
    necessary no, strongly preferred, yes


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