XenServer - Disk or Array Performance Monitoring



  • So in an offline conversation the question was asked "how do I monitor disk performance of my xenservers?" I had to reply that I don't, I simply haven't been able to get to looking into a good reliable way of doing this.

    Xen Orchestra has the functionality for this, and so does Xen Center. In Xen Center this is under "performance" on your Xen Host, actions, new graph.

    Select your Local Storage on <HOST> Write IOPS and Local Storage on <HOST> Write Throughput. Below is a screen shot of the Write IOPS and Throughput.

    0_1452185758332_2016-01-07_11-54-17.png

    Hopefully this answers anyone else's question.



  • Now I know I didn't state this above, but you can do the same for Read as well.

    Also included are

    Inflight Request, IO Wait, Latency, Queue Size Total IOPS and Total Throughput.



  • Reading the below stats is a bit, awkward to say the least it shows the information, but it's not entirely clear in my opinion. XenCenter seems to graph the disk usage more accurately at the Hypervisor level. (shown below is XO showing the Hypervisor level)

    0_1452189348096_2016-01-07_12-55-36.png

    When you select a VM though you get something similar to below.

    0_1452189500086_2016-01-07_12-58-12.png

    Now I personally, don't care so much about an individual VM's disk performance, I care about the host. So for me using XenCenter provides a "better" explanation of what I'm reading.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    Reading the below stats is a bit, awkward to say the least it shows the information, but it's not entirely clear in my opinion. XenCenter seems to graph the disk usage more accurately at the Hypervisor level. (shown below is XO showing the Hypervisor level)

    0_1452189348096_2016-01-07_12-55-36.png

    When you select a VM though you get something similar to below.

    0_1452189500086_2016-01-07_12-58-12.png

    Now I personally, don't care so much about an individual VM's disk performance, I care about the host. So for me using XenCenter provides a "better" explanation of what I'm reading.

    That's pretty cool. However keep in mind that in some cases, a single VM's disk performance can be hurting performance for the other VMs as well.



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