Who ya gonna call?



  • I’m curious what other people do when they run across situations like this.

    Let’s say you have two offices connected by vpn on two different service providers. Lets call Site A the main office, Site B the remote office. Site A and B each have different ISPs. Packets are being dropped between the two sites but, traffic just reaching out to the internet works fine for both sites. Performing a traceroute between the two sites shows you being routed through a 3rd providers network, and one of the links in that providers network is dropping the packets from intermittent issues. The link is up enough that the router doesn’t detect it as down to use another route to send the traffic through. But it is disruptive enough that people in Site B can’t access the services in Site A.

    Where/who would you contact to begin troubleshooting/reporting this issue to?



  • I would contact the ISPs for each site and report the problem and escalate up their food chains until you get a network engineer working with you or the problem is resolved.



  • @dafyre said:

    I would contact the ISPs for each site and report the problem and escalate up their food chains until you get a network engineer working with you or the problem is resolved.

    That is normally they way I go, just dealing with local cable companies sucks, I could never get escalated up because they never saw an issue on their side. In the end I moved the remote office to the same ISP so traffic never left their network. (couldn't set it up initially that way because service wasn't available at the time in the area)



  • If you have the one throat to choke now, call your ISP and run it up the food chain. If you call them to day and don't hear anything back, call tomorrow and ask to speak to a manager. And while you are speaking with the manager, ask to speak with a network technician... and if that doesn't work, just keep going right on up the food chain.



  • @dafyre said:

    I would contact the ISPs for each site and report the problem and escalate up their food chains until you get a network engineer working with you or the problem is resolved.

    This is about all you can do short of changing ISPs as you mentioned.

    I've had to do this before with regards to phone call issues. When a Verizon caller was calling us on Cox the call quality was horrible. The only thing I could do was report it and hope Cox would work with Verizon to fix the issue.



  • Its no longer an issue now, at least with that site. I have a higher up contact now with our main site if an issue arises anywhere else. I was just curious if there were any other options out there i had not considered.



  • It bugs me that changing ISPs is the only option you have if an issue like that comes up.
    Specifically my issue was with a link on Level3's network that I wasn't a customer of, so no way to report an issue.



  • @brianlittlejohn said:

    It bugs me that changing ISPs is the only option you have if an issue like that comes up.
    Specifically my issue was with a link on Level3's network that I wasn't a customer of, so no way to report an issue.

    This is no different than the problem people were having connecting to Netflix. If the peering point between your ISP and another that was between you and Netflix was having issues, you are having issues. Nature of the internet.


  • Banned

    We use ADCom for this type of stuff. http://www.adcomsolutions.com/ They monitor the connections and even put in tickets with the providers for us.