Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    SO, Conversation started that I should try coding.

    Right, so this is the base starting point. You DID know what you wanted to do... to "try coding." That's totally different than saying you didn't know what you wanted to do. It might not be much, but it is an extremely clear direction.

    So if this is true, then it tells you a LOT of where to start.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    I dont actually know what I want to learn.

    Is this actually true? You weren't interesting in learning to code, but just stumbled on a coding site and went with the non-coding stuff? This doesn't match your other statements of being told to try coding and then going to look to learn to code.

    If you were trying to learn to code... that leads you down one path.

    If you weren't trying to learn to code and were just looking for general education of any kind, then it leads you somewhere completely different.

    SO, Conversation started that I should try coding.
    The person I was talking to suggested trying something free - So i googled "Free Coding" and Free Code Camp popped up.
    I found a lot of people liked it on different websites so I popped in and started up.
    Am I interested in learning code? Yes, I've had an interest in writing code for a while.
    I've tried several different sites in the past and then something else came along.
    I just figured I'd give it another try now that I am more comfortable with things in my life, Wanted to change it up .

    Honestly, just think of something you want to accomplish it and figure out a way to do it. Doing a bunch of examples and tutorials isn't going to get you far. You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it. Once you start doing it to produce something, you'll learn everything you need.

    My first programming, beyond just playing around with the basics, was making a website that had tools to calculate different things for this RTS/MMO game I used to play. LAMP stack stuff.



  • @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs I just came across this, too
    https://github.com/collections/learn-to-code

    LOL I am using free code camp right now for learning Html5/html, and CSS is what i'm currently on

    Try the the SoloLearn app on your phone. It's a really great place to start.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs I just came across this, too
    https://github.com/collections/learn-to-code

    LOL I am using free code camp right now for learning Html5/html, and CSS is what i'm currently on

    Try the the SoloLearn app on your phone. It's a really great place to start.

    Also available on your desktop..

    https://www.sololearn.com/Course/Python/



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @DustinB3403 said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    is that open source ?
    I've heard the name a few times but never really messed with it.

    Is GitHub open source. . . .?

    .....

    I use GitLab and GitHub both a lot, almost equally. I like GitHub a lot more. If you want to host your own, then you use GitLab unless you get GitHub Enterprise which is excellent. Otherwise, GitHub IMHO.

    I know quite a few bandwagoneers kneejerked over to GitLab when Microsoft bought GitHub, but it's really still the same as it's always been except now it's better.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    I know quite a few bandwagoneers kneejerked over to GitLab when Microsoft bought GitHub

    No one around here. Everyone I know was on GitLab already when GitHub got bought out.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    but it's really still the same as it's always been except now it's better.

    Actually I see the opposite... people flocking to GitHub after the acquisition that didn't before. Because GitLab was always free, but GitHub was only free for private repos after the acquisition. So the big userbase of GitLab couldn't use GitHub until recently. If anything, I see the bandwagoners going to GitHub now.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    I mean - you said they're good for getting basic concepts and syntax correct, So It's not a terrible thing to start with , never coding really a day in my life?

    Remember that all the world's coders that aren't super young all learned to code before HTML existed. There was no reason or concept of using formatting documents as a way to learn to write algorithms. Once you know what coding actually is, you'll be like "oh, yeah, that taught me nothing that wasn't just common sense basics." Everything you are learning in HTML and CSS at this point is totally specific to HTML and CSS and you are way past any overlapping skills like typing, formatting, and copying.

    I think learning to code today is way better than if you learned in the 80s or 90s. So many resources and tools.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    I mean - you said they're good for getting basic concepts and syntax correct, So It's not a terrible thing to start with , never coding really a day in my life?

    Remember that all the world's coders that aren't super young all learned to code before HTML existed. There was no reason or concept of using formatting documents as a way to learn to write algorithms. Once you know what coding actually is, you'll be like "oh, yeah, that taught me nothing that wasn't just common sense basics." Everything you are learning in HTML and CSS at this point is totally specific to HTML and CSS and you are way past any overlapping skills like typing, formatting, and copying.

    I think learning to code today is way better than if you learned in the 80s or 90s. So many resources and tools.

    Tell me about it. I had to actually leave the house and go to this building called a library.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    https://mangolassi.it/topic/3428/web-resources-for-learning-python

    Where's my dipping toes into programming thread? Some good stuff in there.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    I think learning to code today is way better than if you learned in the 80s or 90s. So many resources and tools.

    And so many more languages. There are loads of better things today. Although also so many distractions. When I learned to code I had a book and a text editor. Clean, simple, obvious. Today people start learning with so many abstractions that they often don't know what is and isn't their code, what is the language and what is a framework, where their code lives, if it is compiled, etc. To people who know what's going on, these tools are amazing. To someone looking to learn, there is so much "fluff" between them and the task that they want to learn that it can be hard to even find a coding resource.

    You could spend a month just learning non-coding skills, installing special ARM hardware, twiddling with special use case IDEs, getting frameworks running, uploading boilerplate files to repos, setting up a continuous integration chain, and suddenly realize you've never even learned what code is yet.

    Coding has gotten a lot more powerful, but also a lot more distracting.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    He seems to be really wanting to learn web stuffs, why not learn PHP?

    I dont actually know what I want to learn.
    I was just trying looking for something to try and free code camp popped up and I figured i'd give it a try.
    HTML/HTML5 CSS etc was just what the curriculum started with..
    nothing intention - Just kind of happened so i rolled with it

    There are some edX courses you can do for free that teach a language with Html and CSS, like Javascript and node. I think some Python too.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.

    I learned by thinking of some project to do as I learn. Figuring out things as you need as well.



  • @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.

    I learned by thinking of some project to do as I learn. Figuring out things as you need as well.

    If you know nothing at all about coding in any language - you're advice is " just go do it"?
    Without even know the basic's of how to make something Print such as (in python3)

    print("Hello ML")
    

    you don't think someone should atleast learn basics before starting on actual projects?

    also - Any ideas on a project i can work on with python? ( I took SAM's advice and started playing with Python - funny enough, It comes kind of naturally.

    what software do you use to write code?



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.

    I learned by thinking of some project to do as I learn. Figuring out things as you need as well.

    If you know nothing at all about coding in any language - you're advice is " just go do it"?
    Without even know the basic's of how to make something Print such as (in python3)

    print("Hello ML")
    

    you don't think someone should atleast learn basics before starting on actual projects?

    The thing is, while you do have to learn the basics, they apply to almost every other language as well.

    IE: c code for your print statement is printf("Hello ML");

    Once you learn the logic to a programming language, learning other languages is mostly just a matter of how they want things formatted.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.

    I learned by thinking of some project to do as I learn. Figuring out things as you need as well.

    If you know nothing at all about coding in any language - you're advice is " just go do it"?
    Without even know the basic's of how to make something Print such as (in python3)

    print("Hello ML")
    

    you don't think someone should atleast learn basics before starting on actual projects?

    also - Any ideas on a project i can work on with python? ( I took SAM's advice and started playing with Python - funny enough, It comes kind of naturally.

    what software do you use to write code?

    If I could start over with zero programming knowledge, I'd start with SoloLearn. Do several courses on there first.

    On SoloLearn, do Python first IMHO, then at least two others. They are short and sweet and you won't regret it. It reminds me a little of DuoLingo.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    @Obsolesce said in Where to read Code?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @bnrstnr said in Where to read Code?:

    You need an objective, and "learning" isn't it.

    This is amazingly true. Coding is SO hard to learn "in a vacuum." But decently easy to learn when there is a reason.

    I learned by thinking of some project to do as I learn. Figuring out things as you need as well.

    also - Any ideas on a project i can work on with python? ( I took SAM's advice and started playing with Python - funny enough, It comes kind of naturally.

    what software do you use to write code?

    I got into python because I wanted to make a Raspberry Pi interact with the world, and python was the best way to do that (at least at the time.) Which reminds me, it's still sitting in my projects box 😛



  • Start with the basics of programming first before trying to do something useful.

    Got to learn the basics of variables, constants, conditional execution, subroutines etc before trying to apply it.

    Aka structured programming.

    Then you have to learn the basics of object-oriented programming, like classes, inheritance etc.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    Is HTML and CSS a starting place though?

    In my opinion, take that for what its worth, html and css is not a good starting point. I say that because , to me, its just visual formatting and not programming. Its what people who consider themselves artists do in the tech world. Again, this is just my opinion, but of you want to learn programming do c, c++, python, or ruby. C is what Linux is based on if I remember right. C++ is systems programming. Python and Ruby are used for most everything else including web, scripting, and data science. Now those 4 languages all serve different purposes and each do things differently. So consider what might be interesting to you and try it out.



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    what software do you use to write code?

    Notepad!

    Just kidding. But overall I like Visual Studio Code (but not for beginners or learners), Atom, Notepad++ and some people like PyCharm and Sublime.



  • @jmoore said in Where to read Code?:

    C++ is systems programming.

    System programming is almost always C, not C++. C is the big one that nearly everything big from Linux to Solaris to Windows to the big databases are written in. C++ is slower and sillier and while people say it a lot, almost no one actually uses it. It's dying away.

    Where C++ used to make sense has been mostly replaced with some combination of Java, C#, Objective-C and Swift directly and loads of other languages indirectly.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Where to read Code?:

    @jmoore said in Where to read Code?:

    C++ is systems programming.

    System programming is almost always C, not C++. C is the big one that nearly everything big from Linux to Solaris to Windows to the big databases are written in. C++ is slower and sillier and while people say it a lot, almost no one actually uses it. It's dying away.

    Where C++ used to make sense has been mostly replaced with some combination of Java, C#, Objective-C and Swift directly and loads of other languages indirectly.

    If you want to learn real programming I'd say knowing C is mandatory. Most people developers I know can program a bunch of different languages. Most languages are just a variation of something older.



  • @jmoore said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @WrCombs said in Where to read Code?:

    Is HTML and CSS a starting place though?

    In my opinion, take that for what its worth, html and css is not a good starting point. I say that because , to me, its just visual formatting and not programming. Its what people who consider themselves artists do in the tech world. Again, this is just my opinion, but of you want to learn programming do c, c++, python, or ruby. C is what Linux is based on if I remember right. C++ is systems programming. Python and Ruby are used for most everything else including web, scripting, and data science. Now those 4 languages all serve different purposes and each do things differently. So consider what might be interesting to you and try it out.

    I wouldn't start with C or C++, unless you really need to build programs that that take advantage of the benefits like better performance and memory handling, I'd go C# first otherwise.



  • Ideas for Practicing Python?
    Im not sure what i can do to really get into it.. ya know?



  • @WrCombs said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    Ideas for Practicing Python?
    Im not sure what i can do to really get into it.. ya know?

    Make it build a web page to calculate something you interested in.



  • @WrCombs This is what a lot of my friends who code for dropbox, weebly, etc strongly suggest in regards to python:

    https://learnpythonthehardway.org/

    I got it. It's written but it also has video/audio tutorials, etc. Pretty great.



  • @wirestyle22 said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @WrCombs This is what a lot of my friends who code for dropbox, weebly, etc strongly suggest in regards to python:

    https://learnpythonthehardway.org/

    I got it. It's written but it also has video/audio tutorials, etc. Pretty great.

    One day I'll get around to going through that course.



  • @EddieJennings said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @wirestyle22 said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @WrCombs This is what a lot of my friends who code for dropbox, weebly, etc strongly suggest in regards to python:

    https://learnpythonthehardway.org/

    I got it. It's written but it also has video/audio tutorials, etc. Pretty great.

    One day I'll get around to going through that course.

    It's very good. I wish I practiced more, I forget most of it but at the time I was very impressed with it.



  • @wirestyle22 said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @EddieJennings said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @wirestyle22 said in Where to read Code? or Best practices to Learn Code?:

    @WrCombs This is what a lot of my friends who code for dropbox, weebly, etc strongly suggest in regards to python:

    https://learnpythonthehardway.org/

    I got it. It's written but it also has video/audio tutorials, etc. Pretty great.

    One day I'll get around to going through that course.

    It's very good. I wish I practiced more, I forget most of it but at the time I was very impressed with it.

    I purchased the PDF of the Python3 course probably a year ago or so.


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