Diving into a completely new tech stack



  • It's not secret technology has changed on us over the years, we always have to learn and readjust, not to mention jumping into a new job where everything seems different.

    I started my career as a NetWare admin, when it started dying out, moved on to Windows, and when Linux became more prominent, hopped on to that. Then from a simple admin, I had to move on to DevOps, learn the stack there, Virtualization gradually became cloud, with containers creeping up on that and so on. Looks like the only folks who don't need to keep up are the greybeards in bank basements coding Cobol for ancient mainframes.

    My point is, things in IT change drastically, and we all need to find efficient ways to relearn, switch paradigms and keep up. How do you guys do that?



  • I am always watching for new books personally. Through my training platform at work we have a book section on all things IT and I watch for stuff that interests me. Automation, programming, virtualization, and Linux are what I enjoy most. I enjoy reading and practicing things at home but that is my preference. Nothing like a good new book on one of those topics for me.



  • @jmoore yeah, I always try to find a fresh book or CBT or both on the topic too. The problem is, sometimes, some of the fresher releases tend to be hard to consume, while something older might be easier and better delivered. So it's a tradeoff.

    And the main problem with either is that it lacks the ability to quickly drop you into being able to at least do some basic things with the new tech, there's always a long intro, history and etc. If I need to get into a new tech fast, I really wish there was a way to remove the extra chars from the books, and concentrate on the important bits



  • Your right it is indeed a tradeoff. Not all books and writers are equal either. I will look at other things an author has done as well if I don't already know him.

    Your second point is right also, there is always a little to get through before you find the meat of the subject. I don't mind too much though as I look for opportunities to get my eyes away from a screen.



  • mangolassi



  • @pete-s said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    mangolassi

    explain



  • @dyasny said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    My point is, things in IT change drastically, and we all need to find efficient ways to relearn, switch paradigms and keep up. How do you guys do that?

    @pete-s said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    mangolassi

    Well a lot of things on ML are shot down, because it's mostly SMB and what is familiar that is the focus here.

    If someone brings up InTune as a good way to manage 10,000 systems all over the world, that gets shot down. My opionion differs... InTune MIGHT not be the best option for a 50 user shop due to pricing, etc... but that doesn't mean it's garbage and someone should use NextCloud on a $2.50 VPS instead...bad example, but just making a point.

    So I think it really depends on what the focus is. Is it SMB only trends? Large enterprise? Both?



  • @obsolesce said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    So I think it really depends on what the focus is. Is it SMB only trends? Large enterprise? Both?

    Is ML only about SMB? Then I might have picked the wrong site to lurk on, haven't done SMB in years, and don't really intend to



  • @dyasny said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    @obsolesce said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    So I think it really depends on what the focus is. Is it SMB only trends? Large enterprise? Both?

    Is ML only about SMB? Then I might have picked the wrong site to lurk on, haven't done SMB in years, and don't really intend to

    I don't think ML is officially SMB only. But I do know that most of the vocally active users here work in SMB.

    I'm trying to get away from SMB. I've had enough of it. But that's another discussion. However, I'll still be 100% active on here regardless.



  • In the past year I've have to quickly acquire some base knowledge in quite a few areas.

    My strategy is first power through some Pluralsight videos. This gives me some familiarity with the theory behind the technology, and makes me more comfortable in planning something to do with it. I typically will not follow along with the videos.

    I then do my own project with the technology. This typically makes me think more about what I am doing than if I just followed along with a video.

    In reality, I would actuated prefer a book. I've used some books that effectively replace the two steps above. However, good books can be hard to find, and it feels like more of a waste when trying to use a poor book. And all the pluralsight series I have watched so far have been really solid. Also, it's easy to watch a video even if you aren't feeling motivated at the time.



  • @flaxking Thanks, I'll see what Pluralsight has on the topics I need to catch up on



  • I generally learn best by actually doing things. Which is why I rent a server to use for a home lab. I can go install stupid stuff and break things without caring all that much.



  • @dyasny So far my only complaint is that they are lacking in kubernetes related courses



  • @flaxking said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    @dyasny So far my only complaint is that they are lacking in kubernetes related courses

    There are WAY too many k8s related resources out there. Openshift is harder to come by, but only marginally



  • ML is one piece of the puzzle. Talking to real world people, tackling different problems helps to break out of the blinders mindset and start looking at the world from a "people have a lot of completely different challenges" perspective.



  • @dyasny said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    @flaxking said in Diving into a completely new tech stack:

    @dyasny So far my only complaint is that they are lacking in kubernetes related courses

    There are WAY too many k8s related resources out there. Openshift is harder to come by, but only marginally

    Yeah, K8s is not a place generally lacking in resources today. If PS lacks them, that can be easily remedied.


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