Miscellaneous Tech News



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Does anyone know - can 10 GbE only run at 10 GbE? i.e. it can't clock down to 2.5 or 5 Gbps?

    Right now I would say no because there’s no standard for those other states. Once there’s a standard and drivers are updated there’s no reason it could not



  • So this is the 2nd to last line in the article.

    The new NBASE-T is now working towards addressing the industry’s need for supporting higher speeds on existing cabling infrastructure.

    Why hasn't the goal always been to get better performance from the same infrastructure?



  • @JaredBusch said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Does anyone know - can 10 GbE only run at 10 GbE? i.e. it can't clock down to 2.5 or 5 Gbps?

    Right now I would say no because there’s no standard for those other states. Once there’s a standard and drivers are updated there’s no reason it could not

    You read to much into my question.

    Can 10 GbE clock down to 1 Gbps? I suppose even if it can, what would be the point? my thinking with the question was - who cares about making a 2.5 or 5 Gbps standard (mainly because those are able to run over Cat 5e and 6) just run 10 Gbps over 5e and run at 2.5 or 5.

    Hell - why not update the 10 GbE spec to do just that? Seems like it would be a lot better than making whole new spec and another SKU, etc. Then we could just deploy 10GE everywhere and it will use the best speed it can that the cable can provide.

    I'm wondering if there was some other limitation in it? I can't imagine that a 10GE port costs more to manufacture than a 2.5 or 5 GE port.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    So this is the 2nd to last line in the article.

    The new NBASE-T is now working towards addressing the industry’s need for supporting higher speeds on existing cabling infrastructure.

    Why hasn't the goal always been to get better performance from the same infrastructure?

    My guess is that "they" were only looking at the DC, and not the end user/end point connections. The cost of recabling a DC (while also replacing the NIC cards to go 10 GE) is likely a no brainer... it's clearly different when you're talking about end users/end points.



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    A sampling of networking gear from CES: TP-Link goes Wi-Fi 6, D-Link goes 5G

    CES isn't all about voice assistants—but naturally, these routers have Alexa.

    *The halls of CES might be filled with voice assistants and OLED televisions, but few things make a bigger impact on your day-to-day experience with technology than your networking solution. And there were a bunch of announcements on that front this year.

    With a Qualcomm SDX55 chipset, five Ethernet ports (1x 2.5Gbps LAN, 3x 1Gbps LAN, 1x 1Gbps WAN/LAN)

    What are 2.5 Gbps LAN?

    Just a standard LAN port, but faster.



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @JaredBusch said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Does anyone know - can 10 GbE only run at 10 GbE? i.e. it can't clock down to 2.5 or 5 Gbps?

    Right now I would say no because there’s no standard for those other states. Once there’s a standard and drivers are updated there’s no reason it could not

    You read to much into my question.

    Can 10 GbE clock down to 1 Gbps? I suppose even if it can, what would be the point? my thinking with the question was - who cares about making a 2.5 or 5 Gbps standard (mainly because those are able to run over Cat 5e and 6) just run 10 Gbps over 5e and run at 2.5 or 5.

    Hell - why not update the 10 GbE spec to do just that? Seems like it would be a lot better than making whole new spec and another SKU, etc. Then we could just deploy 10GE everywhere and it will use the best speed it can that the cable can provide.

    I'm wondering if there was some other limitation in it? I can't imagine that a 10GE port costs more to manufacture than a 2.5 or 5 GE port.

    The big driver was "cheaper hardware."



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @JaredBusch said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Does anyone know - can 10 GbE only run at 10 GbE? i.e. it can't clock down to 2.5 or 5 Gbps?

    Right now I would say no because there’s no standard for those other states. Once there’s a standard and drivers are updated there’s no reason it could not

    You read to much into my question.

    Can 10 GbE clock down to 1 Gbps? I suppose even if it can, what would be the point? my thinking with the question was - who cares about making a 2.5 or 5 Gbps standard (mainly because those are able to run over Cat 5e and 6) just run 10 Gbps over 5e and run at 2.5 or 5.

    Hell - why not update the 10 GbE spec to do just that? Seems like it would be a lot better than making whole new spec and another SKU, etc. Then we could just deploy 10GE everywhere and it will use the best speed it can that the cable can provide.

    I'm wondering if there was some other limitation in it? I can't imagine that a 10GE port costs more to manufacture than a 2.5 or 5 GE port.

    The big driver was "cheaper hardware."

    What makes it cheaper, specifically? do you know?



  • On copper, 10gbe requires cat 6A to go 100 m. On regular cat six you could maybe go 50 m if it types out well. That is not enough for almost any office.



  • To make sure it can always update, Windows 10 will reserve 7GB more disk space

    It reserves the space all the time because it needs it some of the time.

    The latest Windows 10 Insider build, number 18312, introduces a new feature wherein the operating system reserves a big old chunk of disk space, effectively expanding its on-disk footprint by another 7GB.

    *The storage reservation is to ensure that certain critical operations—most significantly, installing feature updates—always have enough free space available. Windows requires substantial extra disk space both during the installation of each feature update (as it unpacks all the files) and afterward (as the previous version of Windows is kept untouched, so that you can roll back if necessary). Lack of free space is one of the more common reasons for updates failing to install, so Microsoft is setting space available on a long-term basis, allowing those periodic updates to be sure they have what they need.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    To make sure it can always update, Windows 10 will reserve 7GB more disk space

    It reserves the space all the time because it needs it some of the time.

    The latest Windows 10 Insider build, number 18312, introduces a new feature wherein the operating system reserves a big old chunk of disk space, effectively expanding its on-disk footprint by another 7GB.

    *The storage reservation is to ensure that certain critical operations—most significantly, installing feature updates—always have enough free space available. Windows requires substantial extra disk space both during the installation of each feature update (as it unpacks all the files) and afterward (as the previous version of Windows is kept untouched, so that you can roll back if necessary). Lack of free space is one of the more common reasons for updates failing to install, so Microsoft is setting space available on a long-term basis, allowing those periodic updates to be sure they have what they need.

    Well if most of their users aren't planning for this, MS has to plan it for them. Makes sense.



  • @mlnews The Windows platform as a whole is just becoming more and more bloated and needy rather than becoming more streamlined, efficient and powerful.



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    To make sure it can always update, Windows 10 will reserve 7GB more disk space

    It reserves the space all the time because it needs it some of the time.

    The latest Windows 10 Insider build, number 18312, introduces a new feature wherein the operating system reserves a big old chunk of disk space, effectively expanding its on-disk footprint by another 7GB.

    *The storage reservation is to ensure that certain critical operations—most significantly, installing feature updates—always have enough free space available. Windows requires substantial extra disk space both during the installation of each feature update (as it unpacks all the files) and afterward (as the previous version of Windows is kept untouched, so that you can roll back if necessary). Lack of free space is one of the more common reasons for updates failing to install, so Microsoft is setting space available on a long-term basis, allowing those periodic updates to be sure they have what they need.

    Well if most of their users aren't planning for this, MS has to plan it for them. Makes sense.

    That doesn't make realistic sense. Windows should be able to clean up after itself and not continually bloat the storage requirements for something that is essentially non-critical.



  • Fixing windows updates, by deleting the updates folder as an example.

    After some amount of time the local copy should be purged to free up that space.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Windows should be able to clean up after itself

    It does, after a certain time it removes these files.

    However, it seems people do not leave enough room on their drive. So the update process fails or causes other issues.



  • @JaredBusch said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    On copper, 10gbe requires cat 6A to go 100 m. On regular cat six you could maybe go 50 m if it types out well. That is not enough for almost any office.

    I agree - but then again, most users don't need 10 GbE - but they might take advantage of 2.5 or 5, over 1 GbE.



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Windows should be able to clean up after itself

    It does, after a certain time it removes these files.

    However, it seems people do not leave enough room on their drive. So the update process fails or causes other issues.

    Exactly - I have visited many a home user in the past where they are constantly having a full disk. it's hard to say if today they are having as much of the problem, considering that before people were using digital cameras - connecting those to the computer, then downloading the pictures, etc. now days they use phones and sync to google and icloud, not so much to local.



  • @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.



  • @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    That was definitely the case on the 17xx updates, but both 18xx updates took under an hour.

    MS has changed the process. The reality is that it still takes 4-40 hours, but 90% of it can be done while the user is still using the computer. Then when the reboot it done, in my experience it's about 20 mins and they user is back in business.



  • @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way



  • @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    I've had windows updates take 2 hours on older systems. But never have I been patient enough to let a system sit for 40 hours, ever on any hardware.

    Downloading updates on the other hand. . .



  • @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    Seen it for sure.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    Seen it for sure.

    Where? and with what Windows version?



  • @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    Seen it for sure.

    Where? and with what Windows version?

    windows 10



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    Seen it for sure.

    Where? and with what Windows version?

    windows 10

    Mm I guess we can move this discussion to another post. But in all seriousness it doesn't take that long to update Windows 10 unless you have a crippled hard drive and low resources computers. Even if you install Windows 10 1703 or 1670 now and then attempt to an upgrade it will bring you to 1809 directly either by the Media Creation Tool or Update Readiness tool. That doesn't take 40 hours, that at most takes 2 hours and plus 1 to 4 hours at most for updates.



  • @dbeato I was being a bit sarcastic, although I have seen a windows 10 update "hang" for more than a day. That said, it has gotten better.



  • @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato I was being a bit sarcastic, although I have seen a windows 10 update "hang" for more than a day. That said, it has gotten better.

    Kinda hard to get the sarcastic Online mode 🙂





  • @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dbeato said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @pchiodo said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @DustinB3403 I think the bigger issue that they cannot resolve is that you can do a full install of windows in about 40 minutes, but the updates take 4-40 hours. How can this even be conceivable? They could wipe out the OS and reinstall in less time then the updates.

    40 hours? no way

    Seen it for sure.

    Where? and with what Windows version?

    windows 10

    Mm I guess we can move this discussion to another post. But in all seriousness it doesn't take that long to update Windows 10 unless you have a crippled hard drive and low resources computers. Even if you install Windows 10 1703 or 1670 now and then attempt to an upgrade it will bring you to 1809 directly either by the Media Creation Tool or Update Readiness tool. That doesn't take 40 hours, that at most takes 2 hours and plus 1 to 4 hours at most for updates.

    It really has for me. We've had systems take over two days to process updates. Should it take so long? Of course not. Does it in the real world? Yup.

    It has improved, and there are work arounds, but the stock update process can absolutely last that long.



  • @pchiodo That's what @Dominica says, but she's actually serious and it is just a cover.




Log in to reply