PORT - Rant about unsupported OS connecting to company VPN



  • Link

    TL:DR Turns out personal equipment is using Ubuntu, rather than Windows.

    My question why is the company actively blocking operating systems besides Windows? Is this common practice that you would do? VPN's are supposed to be OS agnostic, right?

    Especially if you have a BYOD policy, which must be the case if the IT team spent 30+ calls talking to the employee and the kid of said employee. . .



  • @dustinb3403 said in PORT - Rant about unsupported OS connecting to company VPN:

    Link

    TL:DR Turns out personal equipment is using Ubuntu, rather than Windows.

    My question why is the company actively blocking operating systems besides Windows? Is this common practice that you would do? VPN's are supposed to be OS agnostic, right?

    Especially if you have a BYOD policy, which must be the case if the IT team spent 30+ calls talking to the employee and the kid of said employee. . .

    Well a company does have the right to support any operating system they want.



  • Pretty standard to block things with NPS that dont meet minimum standards.
    Other jobs used to block xp machines from connecting to the vpn after 2009. Also machines without a/v.



  • The point I was trying to make, is if the company is providing a VPN, they should also provide the Windows environment. Rather than saying BYOD we'll support you conditions apply - only windows devices supported.

    BYOD policies are great when managed by competent IT departments. This one is opting to exclude everything but Windows systems from its BYOD policy. VPN can block specific devices, and operating systems etc. Which if it was company policy, why did the doctor not immediately know that it was unsupported?

    Why not setup a VDI environment that any OS can connect to the VPN and use Windows to perform work?

    Why did it take 30+ calls to find out that the doctors personal equipment is running Ubuntu?



  • @dustinb3403 said in PORT - Rant about unsupported OS connecting to company VPN:

    Why did it take 30+ calls to find out that the doctors personal equipment is running Ubuntu?

    It took 30 calls and a 6 hour round trip to discover it was running Ubuntu - because their remote access solution wouldn't work either - likely because local kid didn't want them to know it Ubuntu - he was likely saying - aww, those idiots at the hospital, they don't know anything, Ubuntu will run anything.. LOL



  • BicycleRider
    Archaic app...there are a number of reasons we cant in the case of the lab(s) and reads of some things... I wont explain all of the reasons why (hell, most of it is still serial interfaces on NEW equipment and USB is their "newest" thing)...Schein wants us to spend "only" like $48m to "Update" all the labs (it has to be an all or nothing for the other interfaces or it is another support nightmare...that is for the "Healthcare Forum" though. 🙂

    LOL - so you fail because your company implemented something without understanding the requirements of updates/upgrades, and now refuse to purchase those update/upgrades to do things right.



  • @dashrender said in PORT - Rant about unsupported OS connecting to company VPN:

    @dustinb3403 said in PORT - Rant about unsupported OS connecting to company VPN:

    Why did it take 30+ calls to find out that the doctors personal equipment is running Ubuntu?

    It took 30 calls and a 6 hour round trip to discover it was running Ubuntu - because their remote access solution wouldn't work either - likely because local kid didn't want them to know it Ubuntu - he was likely saying - aww, those idiots at the hospital, they don't know anything, Ubuntu will run anything.. LOL

    Even if the application that the hospital is using, was built for Windows 2000, has no bearing on the matter of the VPN dropping the client.

    Why the vpn server didn't have logging to say it was dropped because it was a blacklisted OS or anything else is the part that is insane. Even Cisco has this functionality. . (lol.. . )