iMac Pro



  • For those who are curious: https://www.apple.com/imac-pro/specs/



  • Price:"1 Million Dollars"

    762195e1666497074ede151e0cbeb39738a411d967572cbbe24b90cf8db6011f.jpg


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    But does it run Korora?



  • Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    It's purpose is to be a Mac. If you wanted a device that does things, this isn't the place you'd be looking.



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    It's purpose is to be a Mac. If you wanted a device that does things, this isn't the place you'd be looking.

    Certain Apple devices are good IMHO. Ipad is great, and the new one looks even better. My workhorse is a MBP from 2011, it works like it's new.



  • I am not sure I would buy one personally, as the price is a bit prohibitive. However, if I had a choice between this and a Windows system, and my employer was footing the bill, I'd go with a Mac. I've used a MacBook Pro for the last 7 months, and while I would be just as happy using Linux, I'm surprisingly satisfied with it. I'm able to do everything I need to do and I don't need to reboot it for weeks at a time. The hardware quality is top notch too, and I really like their monitors. They definitely need to come up with a good docking solution though, I hate having to plugin cables.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    It's purpose is to be a Mac. If you wanted a device that does things, this isn't the place you'd be looking.

    Certain Apple devices are good IMHO. Ipad is great, and the new one looks even better. My workhorse is a MBP from 2011, it works like it's new.

    Yes. I've had great luck with non-Mac Apple products.



  • @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".



  • @RojoLoco said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".

    I disagree. The macbook family (in baseline config) were and maybe are still great unix machines to work with. I had Dell XPS and other cool laptops, but with my macbook I had ZERO and I mean ZERO issue in six years. Still run like a charm.

    Ok, Dell precision workstation maybe are even better and with great Linux support, but… guess what? They aren't that portable. The whole current XPS line is plagued with coil whine and other issues. The Thinkpad X1 is pricey and it's Lenovo… and maybe is the better alternatives. The mac just works, in my experience. I'm not a fanboy at all (apart about Linux :D), but I recognize good products when I use it… for years, without an hiccup.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    The mac just works, in my experience.

    That wasn't my experience. It was certainly decent, but it wasn't on par with the Asus running Ubuntu, for example. The hardware was good, but not "as good" as alternatives that were cheaper. It didn't prove to be fast, reliable or cheap. It wasn't slow or unreliable, but certainly not amazing.



  • @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @RojoLoco said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".

    I disagree. The macbook family (in baseline config) were and maybe are still great unix machines to work with. I had Dell XPS and other cool laptops, but with my macbook I had ZERO and I mean ZERO issue in six years. Still run like a charm.

    Ok, Dell precision workstation maybe are even better and with great Linux support, but… guess what? They aren't that portable. The whole current XPS line is plagued with coil whine and other issues. The Thinkpad X1 is pricey and it's Lenovo… and maybe is the better alternatives. The mac just works, in my experience. I'm not a fanboy at all (apart about Linux :D), but I recognize good products when I use it… for years, without an hiccup.

    I agree fully. I'm not a fanboy in the least, but I got a good deal on a 2012 MBP, and have been using it for the past 2 years without any issues. Used all day, like 6 days a week, thrown in and out of bags, taken to dirty work areas, etc. No issues at all. However, the first thing I did when I got it was maxed the memory and put in an SSD. I don't see myself needing to upgrade for quite some time. I feel like the "older" MBPs (2011-2012ish era) were the last "IT pro friendly" ones. The things are just tanks.

    When it comes time to need a new one, will I get a newer model MPB? Probably not, unless I get a slamming deal.


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    @fuznutz04 said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @RojoLoco said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".

    I disagree. The macbook family (in baseline config) were and maybe are still great unix machines to work with. I had Dell XPS and other cool laptops, but with my macbook I had ZERO and I mean ZERO issue in six years. Still run like a charm.

    Ok, Dell precision workstation maybe are even better and with great Linux support, but… guess what? They aren't that portable. The whole current XPS line is plagued with coil whine and other issues. The Thinkpad X1 is pricey and it's Lenovo… and maybe is the better alternatives. The mac just works, in my experience. I'm not a fanboy at all (apart about Linux :D), but I recognize good products when I use it… for years, without an hiccup.

    I agree fully. I'm not a fanboy in the least, but I got a good deal on a 2012 MBP, and have been using it for the past 2 years without any issues. Used all day, like 6 days a week, thrown in and out of bags, taken to dirty work areas, etc. No issues at all. However, the first thing I did when I got it was maxed the memory and put in an SSD. I don't see myself needing to upgrade for quite some time. I feel like the "older" MBPs (2011-2012ish era) were the last "IT pro friendly" ones. The things are just tanks.

    When it comes time to need a new one, will I get a newer model MPB? Probably not, unless I get a slamming deal.

    If they were cheap(ish) they'd be generally great buys. Pop some Linux on there and you have a great option. But the prices are crazy. It's priced like a premium but it's only a mediocre system.



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @fuznutz04 said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @RojoLoco said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".

    I disagree. The macbook family (in baseline config) were and maybe are still great unix machines to work with. I had Dell XPS and other cool laptops, but with my macbook I had ZERO and I mean ZERO issue in six years. Still run like a charm.

    Ok, Dell precision workstation maybe are even better and with great Linux support, but… guess what? They aren't that portable. The whole current XPS line is plagued with coil whine and other issues. The Thinkpad X1 is pricey and it's Lenovo… and maybe is the better alternatives. The mac just works, in my experience. I'm not a fanboy at all (apart about Linux :D), but I recognize good products when I use it… for years, without an hiccup.

    I agree fully. I'm not a fanboy in the least, but I got a good deal on a 2012 MBP, and have been using it for the past 2 years without any issues. Used all day, like 6 days a week, thrown in and out of bags, taken to dirty work areas, etc. No issues at all. However, the first thing I did when I got it was maxed the memory and put in an SSD. I don't see myself needing to upgrade for quite some time. I feel like the "older" MBPs (2011-2012ish era) were the last "IT pro friendly" ones. The things are just tanks.

    When it comes time to need a new one, will I get a newer model MPB? Probably not, unless I get a slamming deal.

    If they were cheap(ish) they'd be generally great buys. Pop some Linux on there and you have a great option. But the prices are crazy. It's priced like a premium but it's only a mediocre system.

    I wish they were cheaper as well. I still need to take the time and put Korora on mine.



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @fuznutz04 said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @RojoLoco said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Cannot find a purpose.

    It's too pricey to be a graphic/video workstation, still lack performance vs the many multi-socket workstation/workstation, use AMD instead or Nvidia (CUDA!!!), non upgradable, non modular design with integrated display… any high-end workstation from Dell/HP/Supermicro can easily destroy it in any benchmark for a fraction of price, and with much better ROI, also.

    So it's just like every other mac in that regard. Useless unless you buy into the "coolness".

    I disagree. The macbook family (in baseline config) were and maybe are still great unix machines to work with. I had Dell XPS and other cool laptops, but with my macbook I had ZERO and I mean ZERO issue in six years. Still run like a charm.

    Ok, Dell precision workstation maybe are even better and with great Linux support, but… guess what? They aren't that portable. The whole current XPS line is plagued with coil whine and other issues. The Thinkpad X1 is pricey and it's Lenovo… and maybe is the better alternatives. The mac just works, in my experience. I'm not a fanboy at all (apart about Linux :D), but I recognize good products when I use it… for years, without an hiccup.

    I agree fully. I'm not a fanboy in the least, but I got a good deal on a 2012 MBP, and have been using it for the past 2 years without any issues. Used all day, like 6 days a week, thrown in and out of bags, taken to dirty work areas, etc. No issues at all. However, the first thing I did when I got it was maxed the memory and put in an SSD. I don't see myself needing to upgrade for quite some time. I feel like the "older" MBPs (2011-2012ish era) were the last "IT pro friendly" ones. The things are just tanks.

    When it comes time to need a new one, will I get a newer model MPB? Probably not, unless I get a slamming deal.

    If they were cheap(ish) they'd be generally great buys. Pop some Linux on there and you have a great option. But the prices are crazy. It's priced like a premium but it's only a mediocre system.

    Why mediocre? What I absolutely need in my endpoint is a good POSIX shell, the best possible RDP client, support for third party/proprietary applications (like Lightroom), and a good set of browsers. The Mac OS has all of that, paired with absolutely perfect HW compatibility and great battery life.
    I think Linux is a far superior OS for server and desktop, but mobility is another stuff and I don't think you can easily beat the macbook/mac os experience.
    I'm thinking of switching to a combination of iPad pro plus a Linux desktop system (for any "physical" stuff like dd-ing a pendrive).


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Why mediocre? What I absolutely need in my endpoint is a good POSIX shell, the best possible RDP client, support for third party/proprietary applications (like Lightroom), and a good set of browsers. The Mac OS has all of that, paired with absolutely perfect HW compatibility and great battery life.

    Or, you know, okay hardware. I'm not sure where people get the idea that Mac makes perfect hardware. I found it to be not as good hardware HP and Asus that I've used. I'm certainly not saying it was bad, but if people did say things like that it was so great, I would never guess that people even thought such things. What makes it perfect? I found it bulky, heavy, very slow, not a good value and easily damaged with the worst trackpad I've ever used.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    I think Linux is a far superior OS for server and desktop, but mobility is another stuff and I don't think you can easily beat the macbook/mac os experience.

    This is what confuses me. What about the experience did you find to be positive? Again, I'm not saying it's awful, just saying that moving from Mac to not-Mac was a very positive move for me. In both hardware and software.



  • Now that's funny, everything I've ever read said the Mac had the best track pad on the planet.....

    Though never having used one I have no clue.


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    @Dashrender said in iMac Pro:

    Now that's funny, everything I've ever read said the Mac had the best track pad on the planet.....

    Yup, which is exactly how you sell things that aren't actually that great. You repeat it over and over. Just like how Ubuntu kept repeating that Unity was the easiest to use Linux desktop so that people actually believed it for no other reason than "they heard it so often" even though it turned out to all be the same source.

    It's APPLE that says it's easy.


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    @Dashrender said in iMac Pro:

    Though never having used one I have no clue.

    Bulky and take a lot of pressure. They seem fine at first use, but once you use it for any length of time, they really wear on you (and create carpal tunnel.)


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    Just the needing special case peripherals for every little thing, not having built in Ethernet even when there is loads of space... just little things that you can predict, they are a pain. And they are HEAVY. The Mac laptops are built to be used on desks by people confused about the purpose of a laptop half the time. They aren't for people looking to like put it on a lap or travel with it. The Pros, anyway.



  • The new MBP, while cool looking are annoying as shit.

    They only have USB-C so everything you own accessory wise, just throw it out and buy new stuff. . .

    Cause yea.... imagine owning one of these things and having to have 15 adapters for everything . . .



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Why mediocre? What I absolutely need in my endpoint is a good POSIX shell, the best possible RDP client, support for third party/proprietary applications (like Lightroom), and a good set of browsers. The Mac OS has all of that, paired with absolutely perfect HW compatibility and great battery life.

    Or, you know, okay hardware. I'm not sure where people get the idea that Mac makes perfect hardware. I found it to be not as good hardware HP and Asus that I've used. I'm certainly not saying it was bad, but if people did say things like that it was so great, I would never guess that people even thought such things. What makes it perfect? I found it bulky, heavy, very slow, not a good value and easily damaged with the worst trackpad I've ever used.

    Maybe you don't like their trackpad, but let me say it's a personal preference… me and 99.9% of users consider it a reference.
    I don't know how you treat your devices, but my 2011 macbook still has just a few scratches. My company buy a lot of those and we had no HW fails at all, when other laptop usually fall apart in 2-3 years.
    I had two Dell XPS, both died from GPU overheating using the best Nvidia drivers I was capable to run at that time… right before warranty expiration. Do I've to say that making Linux working good on the XPS 15 takes at least 10 hours per month and that almost any kernel upgrade broke something?
    Of course I never need to fight against macbook hardware in mac os x. This thing alone has paid me back a lot more than the 2-300 euros of acquisition price difference. That's what I call ROI.
    The battery on my last XPS with Linux last less than 2:30 hours. I'm using my mbp 2011 for writing this post, and two hours has consumed just 25% of charge.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Of course I never need to fight against macbook hardware in mac os x. This thing alone has paid me back a lot more than the 2-300 euros of acquisition price difference.

    That's nowhere near the price difference here. Here I'm getting Macs for $5K that are competing against $1K machines. The difference in cost is staggering.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Maybe you don't like their trackpad, but let me say it's a personal preference… me and 99.9% of users consider it a reference.

    I've heard lots of people say that, but never someone who had used one. Just people who had repeated it like @Dashrender mentioned a few posts up. They work, but not particularly well. So much unnecessary effort.



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Of course I never need to fight against macbook hardware in mac os x. This thing alone has paid me back a lot more than the 2-300 euros of acquisition price difference.

    That's nowhere near the price difference here. Here I'm getting Macs for $5K that are competing against $1K machines. The difference in cost is staggering.

    "Here", where? A baseline macbook 12 or 13 should be fine for any sysadmin stuff, and much more. iMac Pro of course makes no sense as I said before.


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    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Of course I never need to fight against macbook hardware in mac os x. This thing alone has paid me back a lot more than the 2-300 euros of acquisition price difference.

    That's nowhere near the price difference here. Here I'm getting Macs for $5K that are competing against $1K machines. The difference in cost is staggering.

    "Here", where? A baseline macbook 12 or 13 should be fine for any sysadmin stuff, and much more. iMac Pro of course makes no sense as I said before.

    Regular MacBook wasn't able to run our test environments, so we needed the Pros. And they weren't up to snuff at all compared to just about anything else.



  • @scottalanmiller said in iMac Pro:

    @Francesco-Provino said in iMac Pro:

    Maybe you don't like their trackpad, but let me say it's a personal preference… me and 99.9% of users consider it a reference.

    I've heard lots of people say that, but never someone who had used one. Just people who had repeated it like @Dashrender mentioned a few posts up. They work, but not particularly well. So much unnecessary effort.

    I use it from 2011 in many machines of my company, and my personal one. No carpal stuff whatsoever, I'm good :D.
    The Dell XPS one was too small and not comparable in ANY way.



  • Mac from the IT side is not something I like to use. I work on a Windows PC for all of that. Though the only issue I am currently having is a Screen Connect one that keeps things difficult, if not for that I would be fully on Mac.

    Now on the Social Medi/Marketing side of my world. Mac all the way. All the things I use work better on the Mac (yes I have tried to run every single one on the PC side as well), there are usually many less steps on the Mac side then the PC side for what I do. Again before someone crucifies me, I work in a VERY different world than all of you so the tools needed are not what you all use.

    For the record, Mint drove me nuts so I went back to a Windows PC way too many things that didn't work there that I needed (it was years ago and I think it would be better now that there is the full O365 ecosystem).


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    I've not used this latest generation of MacBooks. they look like a copy of the Asus, which is a step in the right direction.

    https://www.apple.com/macbook/specs/


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