How much notice to give an employer?



  • I was thinking about this on the way to work today. A colleague is going to be putting in their notice, and we were on the discussion of how much time to give. I've never been slighted by an employer before, but here's what I've witnessed over the years:

    *Person puts in their 2 week notice. They finish it out and move on.

    *Person is somewhat on their last leg, puts in their notice, employer fires them since they are leaving anyway.

    Person puts in their notice with an employer they have a REALLY good relationship with. Working with the employer, they are really cool and level headed. Employer fires this really good employee on the spot after receiving a 1-month notice. I ask the employer, very surprised. Employer's response, "meh, he's leaving anyway. F** him. It's just business."

    *In an environment highly concerned with security, I saw many people get put on administrative leave during their two week notice. I was actually given the option, "We can either put you on leave and phase you out, you'll be paid the entire time, or you can work and be paid." I opted to be put on leave with pay, and they could contact me with any questions about the transition. I received many questions, as well as a comment of "geez... you have a lot of institutional knowledge. Would you like to come back during the duration?" I already had a new gig so I declined.

    I've had employers tell me they want me to give as much notice as possible, because talent in that area was very sparse and it took a long time to find someone. While others would fire you if it meant you wanted to leave.

    Bottom line, how much notice do you put in? Because if you have a good relationship, and are trying to help out the employer by giving a HUGE notice, they may not return the favor. I think the average is typically 2 weeks as it's pretty standard...



  • I've always provided the two week notice, and every time I've been asked to "reconsider" etc.

    At my last place, they had hired a person to come in and be my direct supervisor, the guy was personable, but had no experience. This along with other reasons had me looking for a position.

    On tuesday of my last week there I'm sitting in my car (as I wasn't motivated to be early) and the HR/Safety guy walks up to my car. He asks if I'm coming in, I say yes, why. He says walk on in with me.

    Hrm OK...

    I'm on my way out, haven't done anything wrong so worst case, they are giving me the rest of the week off. Yay Me.

    So the safety guy is in front, me in the middle and my new boss behind me.

    I start to walk into the conference room, and am told, "Actually Dustin we need you in this office".

    After sitting in with the HR manager, I'm told they are letting that guy go, he'd been there for less than 2 weeks, and that today would be his last day.

    Moral of the story

    So the 2 week notice is purely to be kind to the staff you appreciate at the place you're leaving. Not for the benefit of the business. The business will cut you loose as soon as they can.



  • If in the US, two weeks unless you are like friends with someone and helping out. I've given notice like "as long as you still need me but are actively trying to replace me" but I knew the manager well.

    The nice thing about being fired is that you don't have to quit. So the employer is at risk of unemployment charges and can't say that you quit but that they fired you without cause. It's to your benefit.



  • 2 weeks is what you give every time. No more, no less.

    Every new employer will appreciate this and understand the two weeks notice.

    As far as the employer you are leaving may beg for 3 weeks or a month. In my opinion you have no right to abide by this. By giving your two weeks you are already showing them a grace period. Employers have no problem laying people off without any grace period so never feel obligated to give any more time. Many times employers will walk IT out the door the same day anyway.



  • I gave 4 weeks at my last job. That was more a favor then anything else though.



  • @coliver said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I gave 4 weeks at my last job. That was more a favor then anything else though.

    Me too. I parted on good terms, and I still get questions from time to time.



  • I just handed in my 2.5 weeks 1.5 weeks ago. I was originally going to give 3 weeks but my appendix decided it no longer wanted to be apart of my body. I am the only computer support guy here so I felt bad, plus my new gig doesn't start until Sept. 6th and I didn't want to go a week without being paid. That being said, the company just posted the job last Friday, still haven't posted the job internally, and very few know that I am leaving. Now I get to train a contractor for 2 days and try and find motivation to stay the entire day of my last day. I went to my boss and told him I would like to leave a few hours early (so I could get a head start driving north to go camping) and he said "I fully expect you to put in a full day and wrap up the remaining projects."



  • @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    2 weeks is what you give every time. No more, no less.

    Every new employer will appreciate this and understand the two weeks notice.

    As far as the employer you are leaving may beg for 3 weeks or a month. In my opinion you have no right to abide by this. By giving your two weeks you are already showing them a grace period. Employers have no problem laying people off without any grace period so never feel obligated to give any more time. Many times employers will walk IT out the door the same day anyway.

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)



  • @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    2 weeks is what you give every time. No more, no less.

    Every new employer will appreciate this and understand the two weeks notice.

    As far as the employer you are leaving may beg for 3 weeks or a month. In my opinion you have no right to abide by this. By giving your two weeks you are already showing them a grace period. Employers have no problem laying people off without any grace period so never feel obligated to give any more time. Many times employers will walk IT out the door the same day anyway.

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)

    I don't believe that is legal?



  • That isn't legal in NY at least.



  • @Minion-Queen said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    That isn't legal in NY at least.

    I'm not sure how it would be legal anywhwere since you have earned that time as part of your employee benefits.



  • @IRJ it depends on how the company is structured. So for me I won't get paid out for the remaining 4 days that I have since I haven't "earned" them yet. You earn them based on the amount of hours you work and when you leave, they can pro-rate that amount. It is perfectly legal.



  • @david.wiese said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ it depends on how the company is structured. So for me I won't get paid out for the remaining 4 days that I have since I haven't "earned" them yet. You earn them based on the amount of hours you work and when you leave, they can pro-rate that amount. It is perfectly legal.

    Well if you haven't earned them yet, but if you have 10 days of vacation accrued. They need to pay it out.



  • @Minion-Queen said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    That isn't legal in NY at least.

    I should qualify. As an employeer you can't stipulate you have to give a certain amounts notice or you don't get money that is owed to you.



  • @david.wiese said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ it depends on how the company is structured. So for me I won't get paid out for the remaining 4 days that I have since I haven't "earned" them yet. You earn them based on the amount of hours you work and when you leave, they can pro-rate that amount. It is perfectly legal.

    yea i wish it was prorated. I get it as I earn it, so every 2 weeks, I get 10 hours of ET. I can use it as I earn it, not before. Texas isn't known for protecting workers, so its probably state specific.



  • @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    2 weeks is what you give every time. No more, no less.

    Every new employer will appreciate this and understand the two weeks notice.

    As far as the employer you are leaving may beg for 3 weeks or a month. In my opinion you have no right to abide by this. By giving your two weeks you are already showing them a grace period. Employers have no problem laying people off without any grace period so never feel obligated to give any more time. Many times employers will walk IT out the door the same day anyway.

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)

    ...and that is extortion. lol



  • @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)

    Yeah this sounds completely illegal in every state of the US.

    Earned Time or PTO is a part of your employment contract. Just because you weren't able to use it, doesn't mean they aren't allowed to get away with not paying you for that time.



  • I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    This allowed time for the employer to have other IT track down any systems the leaving employee had, while re-leaving the need to pay for PTO or Earned Days (besides whatever might have still "rolled over")



  • @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.



  • @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    This allowed time for the employer to have other IT track down any systems the leaving employee had, while re-leaving the need to pay for PTO or Earned Days (besides whatever might have still "rolled over")

    They have to pay you as if you are working to do that, not make you take PTO. I've had this happen, but they just paid me to stay home (for six months) because they didn't want to fire me or break the law.



  • @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Why would that be questionable? Or why would you say the person leaving was tricked into using PTO?



  • @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @david.wiese said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ it depends on how the company is structured. So for me I won't get paid out for the remaining 4 days that I have since I haven't "earned" them yet. You earn them based on the amount of hours you work and when you leave, they can pro-rate that amount. It is perfectly legal.

    yea i wish it was prorated. I get it as I earn it, so every 2 weeks, I get 10 hours of ET. I can use it as I earn it, not before. Texas isn't known for protecting workers, so its probably state specific.

    That is how my employer does it as well, vacation time/number of pay periods in a year = earned per pay period. This seems to be the most fair system to everyone.

    Those companies that give you zero the first year and dump 2 weeks into your vacation pool on your anniversary just suck. The claim being that you've earned the vacation, but really you can't collect on it. It's all or nothing.

    Earning vacation by the pay period seems the most fair - granted it's not real time, though I think my employer would actually pay me vacation time earned based on real time if I left in the middle of a pay period, it the closest thing to fair for both parties.



  • @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    2 weeks is what you give every time. No more, no less.

    Every new employer will appreciate this and understand the two weeks notice.

    As far as the employer you are leaving may beg for 3 weeks or a month. In my opinion you have no right to abide by this. By giving your two weeks you are already showing them a grace period. Employers have no problem laying people off without any grace period so never feel obligated to give any more time. Many times employers will walk IT out the door the same day anyway.

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)

    That's called theft. Not paying you money that you have already earned is illegal in the US. It's not a state law, it's federal. It's employment fraud and literally just theft. The US Attorney's General's office would get involved. It could also flag them for tax fraud (since they HAVE to pay the income taxes on that money even if they stole it from you... and you can be sure that they are not.) So it's tax and employment fraud at the federal level, violation of employment rights and then standard theft at the state level.

    Very, very illegal.



  • @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Why would that be questionable? Or why would you say the person leaving was tricked into using PTO?

    How could it be questionable? It's not something that an employer can make you do.



  • @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @Brains said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    My employer requires 1 month of notice otherwise you are not paid out your Earned Time (Vacation days)

    Yeah this sounds completely illegal in every state of the US.

    Earned Time or PTO is a part of your employment contract. Just because you weren't able to use it, doesn't mean they aren't allowed to get away with not paying you for that time.

    More importantly... it's part of your PAY. Pay that you have already earned. So taking it away is no different than holding you down and emptying your wallet.



  • @IRJ said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @david.wiese said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @IRJ it depends on how the company is structured. So for me I won't get paid out for the remaining 4 days that I have since I haven't "earned" them yet. You earn them based on the amount of hours you work and when you leave, they can pro-rate that amount. It is perfectly legal.

    Well if you haven't earned them yet, but if you have 10 days of vacation accrued. They need to pay it out.

    Exactly



  • @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Maybe neither - send you home without pay. I hear about shops that close for 2 weeks over holidays. Those shops tell the employees, you have two options, use vacation time to get paid, or go without pay.

    Are you saying this is illegal?



  • @Dashrender said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Maybe neither - send you home without pay. I hear about shops that close for 2 weeks over holidays. Those shops tell the employees, you have two options, use vacation time to get paid, or go without pay.

    Are you saying this is illegal?

    It's legal. But they are laid off. Company takes the hit for laying people off for two weeks. That's a furlough (temporary lay off with a guaranteed return date.) So yes, if you are asking if firing the person is legal, sure. But they then STILL have to pay the PTO AND they have to pay unemployment!



  • @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @Dashrender said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Maybe neither - send you home without pay. I hear about shops that close for 2 weeks over holidays. Those shops tell the employees, you have two options, use vacation time to get paid, or go without pay.

    Are you saying this is illegal?

    It's legal. But they are laid off. Company takes the hit for laying people off for two weeks. That's a furlough (temporary lay off with a guaranteed return date.) So yes, if you are asking if firing the person is legal, sure. But they then STILL have to pay the PTO AND they have to pay unemployment!

    Could they lay them off? or does that suffer the same penalties as firing them?

    I do realize they have to pay the PTO regardless, it's earned, it's legally their money. I'm just trying to see if there is a legal way of doing what Dustin said?

    In "at will" states, the firing without cause is pretty much meaningless, so if you don't want the employee to finish out their 'notice' just fire them with few/no issues - yeah of course unemployment could still be an issue.



  • @Dashrender said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @scottalanmiller said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    @DustinB3403 said in How much notice to give an employer?:

    I've heard of cases were a person was leaving their job, and forced to take PTO for the 2 weeks, consuming the PTO.

    Tricked, not forced. You can't be forced to take PTO, not unless you signed an agreement ahead of time that agreed to that and even then it's questionable.

    Maybe neither - send you home without pay. I hear about shops that close for 2 weeks over holidays. Those shops tell the employees, you have two options, use vacation time to get paid, or go without pay.

    Are you saying this is illegal?

    I've experienced this at one of my first jobs. It was the oddest thing (being a kid and not knowing what the heck was occurring) Ok the business is closing for these 2 weeks, take PTO (which still seems odd) or don't get paid.

    "Hey we're closing the business for two weeks, your technically fired for this time, with a guaranteed restart date, but you can use PTO and still get a check..."

    Um no pay me for unemployment, and continue my PTO when the business starts back up.


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