Windows Server Key



  • We have already activated windows server in my company but now I have installed new windows 2008 server so I asked my senior for key he said check with the other server take that key and activate this server, now am unable to take the key form the server so give me some solution or how to take without using or installing a third party software.



  • Buy a license or get a volume license agreement with Microsoft.

    If your senior doesn't want to pay for a Windows Server license, then he should not be using Windows.
    A Windows license is part of the cost of doing business when using Windows.



  • @nadnerB for your kind information we have license but he is not telling to me he is telling to find from the server installed and to give



  • They key cannot just be found, you need a tool to extract it. This is the most common one of which I know.

    https://www.magicaljellybean.com/keyfinder/



  • @RoopanKumar said:

    @nadnerB for your kind information we have license but he is not telling to me he is telling to find from the server installed and to give

    How do you know you have the correct licenses? If you do have correct and valid licenses, then your senior should have the key either on paper forms from Full Box Product, or in the MSLC licensing portal on microsoft's website. There should be no need for you to extract a key from a running server in a legal setup.

    If you've lost the paper copies, well, then you don't legally have those licenses anymore, so that's not excuse either.



  • If you're in a part of the world that doesn't pay attention to legal licensing issues - well good luck with that, and I'm hoping these forums won't openly participate in helping you buy pass those fees.



  • So long as you are licenced, is there anything wrong with activating with a different key?

    If so, I don't see what is wrong with helping the OP instead of accusing him of engaging in illegal activities.


  • Banned

    This sounds illegal. If do you have a seat to cover the new server.. you don't just get one license you need to buy one for each server. If You you are using volume the key will be on MS VLSC so you wouldn't need to do this.

    If it's retail you need a different key for each server, so you don't want to activate in this method. You will need to get the key from a new retail copy you bought, not from the installed one.


  • Banned

    @RoopanKumar said:

    @nadnerB for your kind information we have license but he is not telling to me he is telling to find from the server installed and to give

    Sounds like his is covering up for not properly licensed systems.



  • @Jason said:

    @RoopanKumar said:

    @nadnerB for your kind information we have license but he is not telling to me he is telling to find from the server installed and to give

    Sounds like his is covering up for not properly licensed systems.

    Or poor documentation and he doesn't have the key on him, thus the quest to dig up key from other system.


  • Banned

    @LAH3385 said:

    @Jason said:

    @RoopanKumar said:

    @nadnerB for your kind information we have license but he is not telling to me he is telling to find from the server installed and to give

    Sounds like his is covering up for not properly licensed systems.

    Or poor documentation and he doesn't have the key on him, thus the quest to dig up key from other system.

    If you don't have the documentation then you don't own the license. You either have a volume license which you can get online, or you have the retail in which case you need the paper copy in order to use. And the key for each install is unique and limited to a very small amount of activations.

    It could also be an OEM copy on the other server if you have no documentation (in which case a sticker would be on the server) and in no way are you allowed to use this on any server besides the one it's on.



  • @Jason said:

    It could also be an OEM copy on the other server if you have no documentation (in which case a sticker would be on the server) and in no way are you allowed to use this on any server besides the one it's on.

    Actually, this isn't entirely true - You could use the downgrade rights of a different license, and MS allows you to reuse your OEM licenses from other machines assuming you own no VL licenses/media/keys.

    But in general, this is not a typical concern, especially on servers.



  • @Jason said:

    If you don't have the documentation then you don't own the license.

    Really? I'm surprised. What if it gets lost? There must be a procedure for getting it replaced. And if you can get it replaced, then you must "own the licence".



  • @Dashrender said:

    If you're in a part of the world that doesn't pay attention to legal licensing issues - well good luck with that, and I'm hoping these forums won't openly participate in helping you buy pass those fees.

    There is a difference between the part of the world that looks the other way and the world where this is fully legal. Don't conflate American legality with global legality. You don't know that they ARE legal in his country.



  • @Carnival-Boy said:

    @Jason said:

    If you don't have the documentation then you don't own the license.

    Really? I'm surprised. What if it gets lost? There must be a procedure for getting it replaced. And if you can get it replaced, then you must "own the licence".

    Welcome to the Microsoft world. In the countries that recognize the licensing system, the paper is all that there is and customers losing it is a primary means by which MS pushes people to the VL system, O365 or, in some cases, to Linux.



  • Has this been proved in court? eg I can prove I have purchased the product (ie I have the invoice for it), but I have lost the paper licence. Has a court ruled that I don't own the licence and therefore that Microsoft can sue me for using unlicenced software? It all sounds very murky. I'd have thought that so long as I can reasonably prove that I purchased the software, I can prove that I own it.


  • Banned

    @Dashrender said:

    @Jason said:

    It could also be an OEM copy on the other server if you have no documentation (in which case a sticker would be on the server) and in no way are you allowed to use this on any server besides the one it's on.

    Actually, this isn't entirely true - You could use the downgrade rights of a different license, and MS allows you to reuse your OEM licenses from other machines assuming you own no VL licenses/media/keys.

    But in general, this is not a typical concern, especially on servers.

    That's not true. You either use Downgrade rights from the OEM licesnse or from another package on them machine. You don't get to use downgrade rights from another package then transfer the OEM licesnse to another system.. It doesn't work that way. You can never transfer an OEM license.



  • @Carnival-Boy said:

    Has this been proved in court? eg I can prove I have purchased the product (ie I have the invoice for it), but I have lost the paper licence. Has a court ruled that I don't own the licence and therefore that Microsoft can sue me for using unlicenced software? It all sounds very murky. I'd have thought that so long as I can reasonably prove that I purchased the software, I can prove that I own it.

    Yes and no. It HAS been proven in court (I don't have a reference but I'm pretty confident.) However, the "paper" that you have to have can include the invoice. So your first question, yes. But if you can prove that you have purchased the product you should be okay.

    As far as I understand it, Microsoft can show that you breached agreement by not maintaining the license but cannot show any damage as you can prove that you paid for it. Basically MS can pursue you for a violation of $0... technically you are at fault, but the amount of fault is $0.

    The issue is when you have no paper and can't prove that you bought it.


  • Banned

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    Has this been proved in court? eg I can prove I have purchased the product (ie I have the invoice for it), but I have lost the paper licence. Has a court ruled that I don't own the licence and therefore that Microsoft can sue me for using unlicenced software? It all sounds very murky. I'd have thought that so long as I can reasonably prove that I purchased the software, I can prove that I own it.

    An Invoice doesn't prove you own it. You could have bought for someone else or bought it and transferred it to someone else.

    I have many invoices for things I've had to buy on my personal credit card while traveling for work. But they aren't my property they are my employers as we get reimbursed.


  • Banned

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    Has this been proved in court? eg I can prove I have purchased the product (ie I have the invoice for it), but I have lost the paper licence. Has a court ruled that I don't own the licence and therefore that Microsoft can sue me for using unlicenced software? It all sounds very murky. I'd have thought that so long as I can reasonably prove that I purchased the software, I can prove that I own it.

    Yes and no. It HAS been proven in court (I don't have a reference but I'm pretty confident.) However, the "paper" that you have to have can include the invoice. So your first question, yes. But if you can prove that you have purchased the product you should be okay.

    As far as I understand it, Microsoft can show that you breached agreement by not maintaining the license but cannot show any damage as you can prove that you paid for it. Basically MS can pursue you for a violation of $0... technically you are at fault, but the amount of fault is $0.

    The issue is when you have no paper and can't prove that you bought it.

    Meaning you still don't get to use the license you lost though, and will have to buy another.



  • Realistically MS would never go after someone who had an invoice... they would be putting themselves at risk for an abuse of litigation charge, risk their licensing being found to be invalid, risk a counter suit for bad faith and simply just risk losing. And then, on top of it, they would be telling legit customers to F off... sending them to the media and into the arms of Linux. A bad move that they would never make.



  • @Jason said:

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    Has this been proved in court? eg I can prove I have purchased the product (ie I have the invoice for it), but I have lost the paper licence. Has a court ruled that I don't own the licence and therefore that Microsoft can sue me for using unlicenced software? It all sounds very murky. I'd have thought that so long as I can reasonably prove that I purchased the software, I can prove that I own it.

    An Invoice doesn't prove you own it. You could have bought for someone else or bought it and transferred it to someone else.

    I have many invoices for things I've had to buy on my personal credit card while traveling for work. But they aren't my property they are my employers as we get reimbursed.

    License does not prove that you own it either. Same issues, you might have transferred it, sold it, just gotten the license online, etc.



  • Bottom line is, if you want to be safe, you run Linux. Windows just adds all kinds of complication and risk around licensing that I'm very surprised by the number of businesses that are willing to take that on. Some need to, of course, and for some it makes sense. But the number of companies that could avoid that risk and get more for less and decide to spend the money to take on the risk astounds me.



  • Everything in the Windows world comes down to a court case. Even Microsoft will never tell you 100% when things are legal or not, they always leave you at risk or in a grey area.



  • From "how do I find my licence key" to "companies should run Linux" in 24 posts 🙂



  • @Carnival-Boy said:

    From "how do I find my licence key" to "companies should run Linux" in 24 posts 🙂

    Well, how else do you interpret the findings of the thread? All these IT pros and no one is actually completely sure what is or isn't legal even for very basic licensing. 🙂


  • Banned

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    From "how do I find my licence key" to "companies should run Linux" in 24 posts 🙂

    Well, how else do you interpret the findings of the thread? All these IT pros and no one is actually completely sure what is or isn't legal even for very basic licensing. 🙂

    Microsoft won't admit or deny anything in a lot of cases we ask our Microsoft Rep stuff.. He sends us links to the vagauge terms microsoft always uses. We ask for clarification on something, and get told it's up for interpretation.



  • @Jason said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    From "how do I find my licence key" to "companies should run Linux" in 24 posts 🙂

    Well, how else do you interpret the findings of the thread? All these IT pros and no one is actually completely sure what is or isn't legal even for very basic licensing. 🙂

    Microsoft won't admit or deny anything in a lot of cases we ask our Microsoft Rep stuff.. He sends us links to the vagauge terms microsoft always uses. We ask for clarification on something, and get told it's up for interpretation.

    Yup.... customer is always at fault is the policy. There is no such thing as sleeping easy with Microsoft products in house. It's always a relationship of our lawyers against yours. That's their singular mode of working with customers.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Carnival-Boy said:

    From "how do I find my licence key" to "companies should run Linux" in 24 posts 🙂

    Well, how else do you interpret the findings of the thread? All these IT pros and no one is actually completely sure what is or isn't legal even for very basic licensing. 🙂

    I actually thought his post was quite humorous. 🙂



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Yup.... customer is always at fault is the policy. There is no such thing as sleeping easy with Microsoft products in house.

    I sleep pretty easy. I act in good faith and believe if I ever make a mistake Microsoft will ask me to make good but won't sue me for damages. I think it's unlikely that I've never broken a Microsoft licence agreement, because they can be very complicated, but I've never done it on purpose. If I started reading stories about businesses getting sued for mistakes, then I might lose sleep, but I get the impression that the only people who should be worried are the ones who knowingly break the law.


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