Linux Audio Books?



  • I'm trying to learn Linux, and occasionally get stuck in ruts where I don't exactly have all the time in the world. But when I do have the time, I'm playing with OpenSUSE and Linux Mint right now, reading a few Linux books, and poking around. Its honestly something I find very amusing and very fun to do.

    My question is in regards to these ruts I get stuck in, don't exactly have time to read but I still want to learn. I do have a few cisco audio books, but for the life of me, I can't find a Linux audio book outside the realm of "this is the story of Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman". Not exactly what I'm interested in. I want a few instructional, maybe "for idiots" books just read out loud. I have an hour drive too and from work, I would love to just sit and listen to Linux stuff.


  • Service Provider

    Have never run across any of those. Not sure how useful they would be without seeing things as you learned about them.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Have never run across any of those. Not sure how useful they would be without seeing things as you learned about them.

    Oh I agree, the cisco stuff I have listened to doesn't really give me a hands on approach to the CLI... but on the same note when I get home, and I go to do a lesson of some sort it clicks a hell of a lot better. As I've noticed many books about computers aren't entirely consistent in their teaching methods. A lot of the stuff they teach you requires you to have knowledge that they teach you later on. Leaving chapters X - Y completely confusing until you reach chapter Z in which everything finally falls into place. Which just leaves the practice activities for X -Y as a redo because they made little to no sense prior. Audio-fying it makes it a little more, graspable at an earlier state in my opinion, even if I can't see it.


  • Service Provider

    If only I had some spare time....



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    If only I had some spare time....

    how 'bout I call you on my drive home from now on and you just talk to me about linux 😛 jk btw.


  • Service Provider

    We could do a Skype recording!


  • Service Provider



  • @RAM. said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Have never run across any of those. Not sure how useful they would be without seeing things as you learned about them.

    Oh I agree, the cisco stuff I have listened to doesn't really give me a hands on approach to the CLI... but on the same note when I get home, and I go to do a lesson of some sort it clicks a hell of a lot better. As I've noticed many books about computers aren't entirely consistent in their teaching methods. A lot of the stuff they teach you requires you to have knowledge that they teach you later on. Leaving chapters X - Y completely confusing until you reach chapter Z in which everything finally falls into place. Which just leaves the practice activities for X -Y as a redo because they made little to no sense prior. Audio-fying it makes it a little more, graspable at an earlier state in my opinion, even if I can't see it.

    The Microsoft exam books are this way... Back in the day when I was studying for NT, the NT workstation test had things that weren't taught until the Server book. From that point forward, I always read the next book before the test, when possible. I need 744 to pass the Workstation test, I got a 744. From then on, I scored in the high 900's. It was definitely a learning (painful) experience.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @RAM. said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Have never run across any of those. Not sure how useful they would be without seeing things as you learned about them.

    Oh I agree, the cisco stuff I have listened to doesn't really give me a hands on approach to the CLI... but on the same note when I get home, and I go to do a lesson of some sort it clicks a hell of a lot better. As I've noticed many books about computers aren't entirely consistent in their teaching methods. A lot of the stuff they teach you requires you to have knowledge that they teach you later on. Leaving chapters X - Y completely confusing until you reach chapter Z in which everything finally falls into place. Which just leaves the practice activities for X -Y as a redo because they made little to no sense prior. Audio-fying it makes it a little more, graspable at an earlier state in my opinion, even if I can't see it.

    The Microsoft exam books are this way... Back in the day when I was studying for NT, the NT workstation test had things that weren't taught until the Server book. From that point forward, I always read the next book before the test, when possible. I need 744 to pass the Workstation test, I got a 744. From then on, I scored in the high 900's. It was definitely a learning (painful) experience.

    Its aggravating isn't it? In my Linux book it keeps saying "we'll go over this in chapter 11, we're on chapter 4 now, so we're going to do it and you won't now why". It hurts for me to keep reading it know that I'm getting nowhere and it won't make sense until I finish reading it the first time and have to read it a second time for it to really make sense.



  • @RAM. I am still reading the Linux book. Sad to say i haven't finished it yet until now.
    BTW hows your Linux Learning?


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