OneDrive Sync Mechanics



  • I've decided to wipe my hard drive and start from scratch with Windows 10.

    I have a LOT of stuff in my local OneDrive folder. Too much that I wouldn't want to wait for it sync all back down.

    If I copy the files to the new computer into the OneDrive folder, should it be smart enough to realize they are indeed the same file that is already in the cloud?

    I can obviously just test it, but was wondering if one of the ML geniuses knew.

    And yes, I called you geniuses!


  • Service Provider

    It will not deep scan a file. So if they are the same but the timestamps are different you will have to resync.



  • Doing a little Googling, it seems like it might actually make duplicates of everything. Ugh.

    Yet another reason to only store these files in the cloud, I guess!

    I guess I could move all the files out of my OneDrive Folder, which would effectively delete them from OneDrive. And then copy them back and let them resync. Kind of what it would do the other way around. Half of one, I guess...


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    Doing a little Googling, it seems like it might actually make duplicates of everything. Ugh.

    Yet another reason to only store these files in the cloud, I guess!

    I guess I could move all the files out of my OneDrive Folder, which would effectively delete them from OneDrive. And then copy them back and let them resync. Kind of what it would do the other way around. Half of one, I guess...

    Why the hell would you do that? Typically, your upload bandwidth is lower than downstream on commodity connections.



  • Do you really need them all synced?



  • @JaredBusch said:

    Why the hell would you do that? Typically, your upload bandwidth is lower than downstream on commodity connections.

    I like doing things crazily backwards because I think they make sense?



  • @Dashrender said:

    Do you really need them all synced?

    No.

    BUT ... I am too lazy to upload stuff all the time.

    🙂


  • Service Provider

    @Dashrender said:

    Do you really need them all synced?

    ODfB does not yet offer selective sync.



  • @Dashrender said:

    Do you really need them all synced?

    Honestly, I am still afraid of having all my data there and there only.

    I understand the odds of OneDrive losing all my data is slim. But wouldn't I look like an idiot if they did?



  • @BRRABill said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Do you really need them all synced?

    Honestly, I am still afraid of having all my data there and there only.

    I understand the odds of OneDrive losing all my data is slim. But wouldn't I look like an idiot if they did?

    You and a zillion other people. Little comfort but I've heard misery loves company.

    I share your distrust/caution of "other people's computer" (I refuse to use the C word one more time today)

    I think there's a way to back it up to / from another cloud provider (probably amazon) if you want to keep it out of meat space.



  • @MattSpeller

    It's not like I think my local machine is any better. I just worry about myself doing something dumb, or something like what happened to SAM where they just messed up.

    If I have it in OneDrive, and then sync everything locally, I can just back that up and I am done. Have copied multiple places.

    I looked into services that backup from on c-word to another, but they are pretty sloooooow considering the data I have.

    It's also the reason I am hesitant to trust 100% anything, even, say, Amazon Cloud Drive. I lose all my kid's pictures...Let's just say I'll be moving in with one of you.

    I'm not sure in an industry where we preach backups how we can be confident in any of these cloud services. Even if they do "backup" our data. Has anyone actually tested that yet?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I'm not sure in an industry where we preach backups how we can be confident in any of these cloud services. Even if they do "backup" our data. Has anyone actually tested that yet?

    Confidence in a specific service (never lump any two services together, that makes no sense and never think of "cloud" as a single thing, each service is unique, just as Super Mario Bros. 3 and MS Office 2013 are not related but both are proprietary, on premises software) has no relationship to preaching backups. We preach backups as a specific thing that is needed. This is no way violates that any more than a user relying on their IT department to run backups violates that rule.

    Do you expect your users to all run their own backup mechanisms at work because "would they look foolish if they trusted that IT guy... does he even test his restores... and all their data was lost?"

    Remember, you are the end user, they are IT. If you don't trust your provider, okay. But then, why are you using them, really?



  • @scottalanmiller

    But data loss happens in more ways than your provider losing data.

    Are you not a fan of the 3-2-1 philosophy?

    I mean, we have no idea what these services are doing, right? You are contending that by "trusting" them we'll be able to reliably get back data?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I mean, we have no idea what these services are doing, right? You are contending that by "trusting" them we'll be able to reliably get back data?

    So.... this is how you feel that your customers or users should feel about you or your IT department?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    But data loss happens in more ways than your provider losing data.

    Give an example that isn't covered by versioning.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Give an example that isn't covered by versioning.

    I inadvertently overwrite all this week's soccer pictures with pictures of the same name by mistake.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Give an example that isn't covered by versioning.

    I inadvertently overwrite all this week's soccer pictures with pictures of the same name by mistake.

    But versioning would cover that.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    So.... this is how you feel that your customers or users should feel about you or your IT department?

    No, but I still have multiple copies of stuff as an IT person for them, because stuff happens.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    But versioning would cover that.

    Not using OneDrive.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    So.... this is how you feel that your customers or users should feel about you or your IT department?

    No, but I still have multiple copies of stuff as an IT person for them, because stuff happens.

    So you feel that in your role as a user that you should act differently than you want other users to act? Do as I say, not as I do?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    But versioning would cover that.

    Not using OneDrive.

    Versioning covers it, plain and simple. What does OneDrive have to do with it?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Versioning covers it, plain and simple. What does OneDrive have to do with it?

    OneDrive only versions Microsoft files.

    Granted, there are services that do versioning of ALL files.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Versioning covers it, plain and simple. What does OneDrive have to do with it?

    OneDrive only versions Microsoft files.

    Granted, there are services that do versioning of ALL files.

    Right, versioning covers it. If you don't version, it doesn't cover it.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Right, versioning covers it. If you don't version, it doesn't cover it.

    How am I supposed to "version it" in OneDrive? If you mean that I should have known and renamed the files appropriately, I agree. But sometimes mistakes happens.

    Hence the need for backup.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Right, versioning covers it. If you don't version, it doesn't cover it.

    How am I supposed to "version it" in OneDrive? If you mean that I should have known and renamed the files appropriately, I agree. But sometimes mistakes happens.

    Hence the need for backup.

    You don't version in OneDrive, in that case, you version locally. Same with normal backups.

    If you are using a Wiki, the wiki handles the versioning. Then you take a backup of the whole mechanism. That puts the full versioning into the backup. Now you have versioning and backups. You don't backup just one version, you backup the full data set.



  • I just don't see the argument for not wanting to have another copy of the data in another place.

    I acquiesced to your concept of not having data locally. I don't personally like it because I think it makes working on stuff (using older or non-cloud aware apps) harder. (Yes, that is another thing I'll need to acquiesce on.)

    But I don't understand why it wouldn't make sense to have another copy of my entire OneDrive file structure in another cloud service, like Amazon Cloud Drive.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    Hence the need for backup.

    You can use a complicated backup mechanism for this, to handle backup versions. But this is overkill and, to some degree, archaic. The backup system doesn't understand your triggers, applications do. Versioning should be done closer to the data and backups be at a high level for the most efficiency and functionality.

    Pictures are a difficult one because they are hard to deal with because you don't version them like that. Having a read only system is the best bet, normally.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I just don't see the argument for not wanting to have another copy of the data in another place.

    Ah, you are getting my point wrong. I never said that at all. I'm saying that you always need a copy in another place. I'm saying that you don't need to be the one that takes that copy.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    But I don't understand why it wouldn't make sense to have another copy of my entire OneDrive file structure in another cloud service, like Amazon Cloud Drive.

    Again, would you tell your users not to trust you? If not, why do you feel that you should act differently than you advice others to act?



  • @scottalanmiller

    I am not arguing that what you are saying doesn't make the most sense.

    But haven't you ever had something go wrong when it was good to have TWO backups of it?

    I'll give you two examples.

    Back in the day of tapes, I once had a backup job running that was looking for a tape. It had jumped a day, and long story short I put a tape in to do a restore, and the data got wiped out. Since then, I used the write tab every time I did a restore. Did I NEED to do that? No, but since I had been burned, it made for one more level of protection.

    Also, back when iPhones were backed up to the machine, I had many instances where it would do an update, then backup the bad data. After getting burned a few times, I learned to do a backup of the iPhone, then do a backup of that backup. Overkill, perhaps. But I got burned enough times for it to make sense.

    I am sure we've all been burned at one time or another by our friendly computers. Having a backup of the backup I think makes absolute sense.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to MangoLassi was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.