Link Checking Software



  • Is there any software (or plug-in) that checks a link before someone clicks on it? That works well? (I know a lot of AV companies do this, but aren't real good at it IMO.)

    I have a friend with a parent who is a new computer user. They have already inadvertently clicked a bad link that threw up a lot of popups.

    I know education is the right answer here, but this person also needs something watching their back in the interim.



  • Invest in Webroot for them. Or a Linux desktop.



  • uBlock origin (with the proper malware filters) will put a warning page when you click something questionable (like download.cnet.com). You can choose to unblock it temporarily or go back. A new user should have the most locked down adblock / script block (ghostery) setup possible. (everyone should, without exception)


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I know education is the right answer here, but this person also needs something watching their back in the interim.

    The best security there, by far, is not being on Windows. Using Windows is just asking for trouble.



  • Yeah I am in this at the end.

    They refused to get anything but Windows apparently.

    What would you suggest? Linux? Mac?

    This popup issue happens on Macs, too.



  • @BRRABill said:

    Yeah I am in this at the end.

    They refused to get anything but Windows apparently.

    What would you suggest? Linux? Mac?

    This popup issue happens on Macs, too.

    Linux Mint.



  • @coliver said:

    Linux Mint.

    I still don't think that is a good option for users coming from Windows. Even though I know everyone here loves it.

    Does Mint really not allow popups when you go to a site that launches popups?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    Does Mint really not allow popups when you go to a site that launches popups?

    That's a browser setting, fix your browser.



  • @BRRABill said:

    @coliver said:

    Linux Mint.

    I still don't think that is a good option for users coming from Windows. Even though I know everyone here loves it.

    Does Mint really not allow popups when you go to a site that launches popups?

    If it is a browser it is going to launch the pop ups. @RojoLoco has a good idea as to how this browser should be set up.

    You said yourself that these are people who are new to computers, Linux Mint would be the ideal operating system to get them started on. Safer/more secure then Windows and since they are probably going to spend 99% of their time on the internet it is compatible with everything that they will want to do.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I still don't think that is a good option for users coming from Windows. Even though I know everyone here loves it.

    Why? It's specifically easy for Windows users. What about it isn't as easy or easier for them? In every way I can imagine it makes the "Windows" experience easier specifically for the type of people that would struggle. Everything is where you expect, things that are hard on Windows are handled for you, security is better, it's faster, etc.

    What reason, as long as it meets the needs, would you have for it not being superior specifically for Windows users looking for something easier that matches all the ways that they have always used the system?


  • Service Provider

    @coliver said:

    You said yourself that these are people who are new to computers, Linux Mint would be the ideal operating system to get them started on.

    If they don't have existing Windows experience then ANY logic for using Windows now has to evaporate (except for maybe gaming.) But even coming from Windows, Mint is generally easier.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    If they don't have existing Windows experience then ANY logic for using Windows now has to evaporate (except for maybe gaming.) But even coming from Windows, Mint is generally easier.

    Apparently they have been using Windows for years, but through AOL or something.

    I think a good pop-up blocker as @RojoLoco suggested would be key here.

    And education, as I mentioned.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    Apparently they have been using Windows for years, but through AOL or something.

    I don't even know what this statement could mean.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I think a good pop-up blocker as @RojoLoco suggested would be key here.

    And education, as I mentioned.

    Those are good things. But why retain the extra effort and risk of Windows? Doesn't that only hurt them?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I don't even know what this statement could mean.

    Me either.

    :)



  • Why not a Chromebook?

    OH, WTF - Chromebooks don't allow you to put favorites on the desktop - sigh!


  • Service Provider

    @Dashrender said:

    Why not a Chromebook?

    OH, WTF - Chromebooks don't allow you to put favorites on the desktop - sigh!

    they do sort of.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Why not a Chromebook?

    OH, WTF - Chromebooks don't allow you to put favorites on the desktop - sigh!

    they do sort of.

    If you have a tutorial, I'd love it.. my googling showed no way to do it.

    The desktop remains empty and seemingly useless.


  • Service Provider

    @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Why not a Chromebook?

    OH, WTF - Chromebooks don't allow you to put favorites on the desktop - sigh!

    they do sort of.

    If you have a tutorial, I'd love it.. my googling showed no way to do it.

    The desktop remains empty and seemingly useless.

    What desktop are you looking at? You do mean the Chrome start screen, right?



  • I've also figured out a way around the Linux/ChromeBook answer for future reference.

    "The user is very basic and needs/wants iTunes."

    :)


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    I've also figured out a way around the Linux/ChromeBook answer for future reference.

    "The user is very basic and needs/wants iTunes."

    :)

    But the more basic that they are, the more Linux and Chomebooks make sense. It's only advanced power users that would want the extra cost and complications of Windows, right?


  • Service Provider

    iTunes is not for basic users. That causes all kinds of problems and is relatively complicated to deal with. Basic and iTunes don't go together.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Why not a Chromebook?

    OH, WTF - Chromebooks don't allow you to put favorites on the desktop - sigh!

    they do sort of.

    If you have a tutorial, I'd love it.. my googling showed no way to do it.

    The desktop remains empty and seemingly useless.

    What desktop are you looking at? You do mean the Chrome start screen, right?

    on the Chromebook I just gave one of my doctors, after they logged into the device they are presented a desktop similar to what you get with any modern GUI interface.

    A wallpaper (with I think Zero icons) and a start bar across the bottom with something like 4 icons (Chrome, Gmail, Google Photos, and something else).

    My doctor asked if there was a way to put an icon on the desktop (on the wallpaper) that when clicked/double clicked (not sure how it worked) would automatically go to the desired website instead of the default homepage.

    I could not find instructions telling me how to do this. In fact, I found the opposite - telling me it couldn't be done without 3rd party add-ons.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    But the more basic that they are, the more Linux and Chomebooks make sense. It's only advanced power users that would want the extra cost and complications of Windows, right?

    iTunes screams advanced user to you?



  • @BRRABill said:

    I've also figured out a way around the Linux/ChromeBook answer for future reference.

    "The user is very basic and needs/wants iTunes."

    :)

    Wait a second.. iTunes is now all in the cloud, no local client needed.
    The mobile device will sync wirelessly.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    But the more basic that they are, the more Linux and Chomebooks make sense. It's only advanced power users that would want the extra cost and complications of Windows, right?

    iTunes screams advanced user to you?

    Not smart user, but not basic. It's NOT simple to use, install or maintain. It's not something for people who want systems to "just work", exactly the opposite.

    Just like, why would they use Windows if they were basic... why make simple things hard just for fun?


  • Service Provider

    iTunes on Mint

    Youtube Video



  • BAH! LOL.



  • @BRRABill said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    But the more basic that they are, the more Linux and Chomebooks make sense. It's only advanced power users that would want the extra cost and complications of Windows, right?

    iTunes screams advanced user to you?

    Yes, because it means you expect the user to plug it into the computer and not just sync wirelessly.


  • Service Provider

    @Dashrender said:

    @BRRABill said:

    I've also figured out a way around the Linux/ChromeBook answer for future reference.

    "The user is very basic and needs/wants iTunes."

    :)

    Wait a second.. iTunes is now all in the cloud, no local client needed.
    The mobile device will sync wirelessly.

    I've been on iPhones for a long time, never needed iTunes. No idea what it is for other than hardware recovery and it really, really sucks having to install it just for that and take all of the problems that it creates.


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