Uh what does this mean..



  • Joel,

    I was asked by COMPANY1 to inform you that since you did technical support for one of their vendors that is seeking legal action against COMPANY1, then the vendor's attorney may be contacting you. Please remember that you signed a confidentiality agreement with Contractor and COMPANY1 and this precludes you from speaking with the vendor's attorney unless subpoened by a judge to do so.

    Please call me if you you would like to discuss or call Jennifer Engle at COMPANY1. I would appreciate your replying that you received this email.

    Thank you.



  • @IRJ I think that's the polite way of saying "Snitches get stitches".



  • @RamblingBiped said:

    @IRJ I think that's the polite way of saying "Snitches get stitches".

    hahah!



  • @RamblingBiped said:

    @IRJ I think that's the polite way of saying "Snitches get stitches".

    Basically this...

    Someone is suing someone else and if you talk about it without a court order to do so Company1 can take legal action against you for speaking out.



  • @coliver said:

    @RamblingBiped said:

    @IRJ I think that's the polite way of saying "Snitches get stitches".

    Basically this...

    Someone is suing someone else and if you talk about it without a court order to do so Company1 can take legal action against you for speaking out.

    Will take, not necessarily can take. They are threatening you to keep quiet to their competition.

    In most cases, this is legit. But not all.



  • And if you think you gots the goods, you can always say "subpoena me, I'm worth it."



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    And if you think you gots the goods, you can always say "subpoena me, I'm worth it."

    Right you can say that you have information but will require a court order to divulge it. Generally (in all cases that I've heard) this is completely legal. Of course I am not a lawyer and you should consult with your own prior to divulging any information.



  • I make them subpoena me just so I couldn't be help accountable for some BS contract that may say I can't talk to another attorney who's suing them.



  • @DustinB3403 said:

    I make them subpoena me just so I couldn't be help accountable for some BS contract that may say I can't talk to another attorney who's suing them.

    Well obviously. Say nothing without a subpoena.



  • I asked how it involves me and the response I received is that COMPANY1 is being sued, not it's individual employees. Well duh, I know that. I didn't do anything wrong.



  • COMPANY 1 is trying to tell me as little as possible about the lawsuit, but at the same time they are telling me not to talk to anyone. Seems fishy to me.



  • @IRJ said:

    COMPANY 1 is trying to tell me as little as possible about the lawsuit, but at the same time they are telling me not to talk to anyone. Seems fishy to me.

    Not really... they are being smart about it. Talking about a lawsuit can be tricky especially if the third party is an unknown quantity.



  • Well, if they don't talk to me then I am going to at least ask any attorney that contacts me what this is about.



  • @IRJ said:

    Well, if they don't talk to me then I am going to at least ask any attorney that contacts me what this is about.

    I've been there. You have to have your contract ready to show them or they have nothing to work with.



  • @IRJ said:

    COMPANY 1 is trying to tell me as little as possible about the lawsuit, but at the same time they are telling me not to talk to anyone. Seems fishy to me.

    Not even slightly fishy. this is absolutely standard.



  • Exactly, I'd find the confidentiality agree you signed and read it. See what it says you can and can't say.

    But not only that, If Company 1 is a customer of yours, why would you want to give any information you're not required to by law. You want to keep them as a customer I assume (or else you should have fired them already), so you want to keep them happy. They say don't talk, don't unless required by law.



  • I worked with COMPANY1 for a few months as a contract employee. It wasn't my favorite job, and that's why I moved on quickly.



  • @IRJ said:

    I worked with COMPANY1 for a few months as a contract employee. It wasn't my favorite job, and that's why I moved on quickly.

    Where you a 1099 "employee"? If so, they may be listing you as a vendor.



  • But regardless, if you had a contract, you are bound by it.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I worked with COMPANY1 for a few months as a contract employee. It wasn't my favorite job, and that's why I moved on quickly.

    Where you a 1099 "employee"? If so, they may be listing you as a vendor.

    No. I worked through an agency



  • Presumably you signed some contract papers? Non-disclosures are very common.



  • It sounds like you were contracted at this company when the event happened and they are sending out a blanket do-not-disclose to anyone who was on their records. You may not have anything to worry about.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Presumably you signed some contract papers? Non-disclosures are very common.

    I probably did. I need to talk with their HR department to see exactly what they say.



  • Yes, you should be able to request a copy of the agreement for your attorney. That's standard.

    I've had to do this before.



  • @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Presumably you signed some contract papers? Non-disclosures are very common.

    I probably did. I need to talk with their HR department to see exactly what they say.

    the HR company that you worked for, not COMPANY1



  • @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Presumably you signed some contract papers? Non-disclosures are very common.

    I probably did. I need to talk with their HR department to see exactly what they say.

    the HR company that you worked for, not COMPANY1

    The Contractor doesnt know anything. They told me to check with COMPANY1. COMPANY1 is the one that contacted the Contractor.

    As far as the contractor, I went to their office one time and never really dealt with them again.



  • While I suppose it's possible that you signed a contract with Company1, that seems odd if you were employed by the contractor.

    Typically you would sign an agreement as part of your employement with the contractor, and the Contractor owners would sign a contract with Company1.

    You need to find out who you signed a contract with so you know where you stand and with whom.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Presumably you signed some contract papers? Non-disclosures are very common.

    I probably did. I need to talk with their HR department to see exactly what they say.

    the HR company that you worked for, not COMPANY1

    Other way around. Remember there are two things at play here... one is that a NDA would be between him and COMPANY1, not the staffing firm. Second is that dollars to donuts they were a payroll service, not his employer legally. IT people use the term "employer" differently that the courts and IRS do. It is nearly certain that COMPANY1 was his employer.

    The company that writes the checks and pays you is not necessarily your employer or else everyone would work for ADP.



  • @Dashrender said:

    Typically you would sign an agreement as part of your employement with the contractor, and the Contractor owners would sign a contract with Company1.

    Not generally, not unless you are part of a team and only working with the client once in a while.


  • Banned

    @IRJ said:

    Jennifer Engle

    as in bill and melinda gates foundation?


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