Updating Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela to 17.3 Rosa



  • It can be a little confusing to figure out how to get from one minor release of Linux Mint to another. If you are going from Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela to Linux Mint 17.3, you can just follow these directions.

    apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && reboot
    

    Then...

    sed -i 's/rafaela/rosa/' /etc/apt/sources.list
    sed -i 's/rafaela/rosa/' /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list 
    apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && reboot


  • @scottalanmiller That seems entirely too awkward of a process to me. I find it hard to believe that they did not design a simpler method.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @scottalanmiller That seems entirely too awkward of a process to me. I find it hard to believe that they did not design a simpler method.

    It is incredibly awkward, but it mirrors the Ubuntu update process. It's an "Ubuntu world" thing to have these weird names in their configuration files and make you updated them in awkward ways to do updates. It's one of the things that I really dislike about it.

    I had to do a bit of searching to track down this for the Mint update. It's similar to what we used to do many versions ago. For some reason they really don't feel that updates should be obvious between versions and none of the tools handle it.



  • I'm suprised they don't just make the sed lines part of the dist-upgrade script... But that's just me.

    Mine is updating as we speak.



  • dist-upgrade is not meant to go between versions so there is a reason that they are not there. Now why they are not in another script, I have no idea.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    dist-upgrade is not meant to go between versions so there is a reason that they are not there. Now why they are not in another script, I have no idea.

    I thought dist-upgrade was for upgrading from things like 17.2 to 17.3... apt-get upgrade is what keeps the packages updated, right?

    Edit: I've always done my Ubuntu upgrades using dist-upgrade.



  • @dafyre said:

    Edit: I've always done my Ubuntu upgrades using dist-upgrade.

    Ubuntu doesn't upgrade like that either, or didn't in the past. You still have to change the sources for dist-upgrade to move up to the next one. People on Ubuntu 14.04.3 still use dist-upgrade to upgrade their daily or weekly patches and it doesn't move them to current releases. It takes other changes, like the sed lines here, to make Ubuntu do that.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    Edit: I've always done my Ubuntu upgrades using dist-upgrade.

    Ubuntu doesn't upgrade like that either, or didn't in the past. You still have to change the sources for dist-upgrade to move up to the next one. People on Ubuntu 14.04.3 still use dist-upgrade to upgrade their daily or weekly patches and it doesn't move them to current releases. It takes other changes, like the sed lines here, to make Ubuntu do that.

    If that is the case, what is the difference between apt-get upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade?

    Edit: I just checked and the command I've been using is do-release-upgrade... not apt-get dist-upgrade...



  • @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    Edit: I've always done my Ubuntu upgrades using dist-upgrade.

    Ubuntu doesn't upgrade like that either, or didn't in the past. You still have to change the sources for dist-upgrade to move up to the next one. People on Ubuntu 14.04.3 still use dist-upgrade to upgrade their daily or weekly patches and it doesn't move them to current releases. It takes other changes, like the sed lines here, to make Ubuntu do that.

    If that is the case, what is the difference between apt-get upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade?

    Edit: I just checked and the command I've been using is do-release-upgrade... not apt-get dist-upgrade...

    Yes, Ubuntu has an extra command that includes the sed stuff specifically for Ubuntu. In Mint, the base is remaining the same Ubuntu now so that command can't be used. They'd have to make their own, which they need to.

    dist-upgrade includes things like the kernel that upgrade does not. There is a really old thread about it around here somewhere where I had the same questions and @thanksajdotcom was explaining to me why I needed to switch me standard patching to dist-upgrade because important patches would be missed otherwise.