Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020



  • Looks like Microsoft is planning on retiring their well known certs. What is everyone's thoughts on this? Would this affect the market for individuals who are looking at getting into Windows System admins roles? Looks like Microsoft is forcing individuals to study Azure. I personally made a decision a few weeks ago to start putting my studying into the RHCSA as opposed to the MCSA. For one, Linux seems to be more fun as I've been playing with it in my home lab, and two, there is not that many people who know Linux. Glad I made that decision.

    Link Here



  • Perhaps Microsoft sees the writing on the wall and is just letting everyone prep for the Linux world?



  • Screenshot from 2020-02-28 20-45-08.png



  • From the looks of it, Microsoft isn't seeing their career path as being very serious anymore. Replacing an MCSE with "learning Teams"? WTF



  • @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    From the looks of it, Microsoft isn't seeing their career path as being very serious anymore. Replacing an MCSE with "learning Teams"? WTF

    Everything is cloud on Microsoft's certification tracts now. You can't be Windows Server certified anymore
    . It's been a phase out, that's been happening for a couple of years and is no surprise



  • Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Perhaps Microsoft sees the writing on the wall and is just letting everyone prep for the Linux world?

    I sit next to this older guy who we hired that was laid off from an Aerospace Defense company after working there for years. He really has no clue about Windows, and mainly used unix. We often chat about unix/Linux as I've been studying Linux, and we talk about how great it is. He's shocked how poor Windows OS is from all the issues we have with our customers. He's just working here for a little while and is about to retire. Which I have no clue why he's even with us....lol



  • @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    From the looks of it, Microsoft isn't seeing their career path as being very serious anymore. Replacing an MCSE with "learning Teams"? WTF

    Everything is cloud on Microsoft's certification tracts now. You can't be Windows Server certified anymore
    . It's been a phase out, that's been happening for a couple of years and is no surprise

    Not a surprise. But doesn't change what a statement it is.



  • @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.

    Throwing their traditional base under the bus, though, isn't necessarily a good way to push their products.



  • On a plus side, that means that the MCSE will be retired and they never offered the top level cert again since the 1990s. So the certification runs out with only about 1,000 of us having ever gotten the terminal cert.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    From the looks of it, Microsoft isn't seeing their career path as being very serious anymore. Replacing an MCSE with "learning Teams"? WTF

    Everything is cloud on Microsoft's certification tracts now. You can't be Windows Server certified anymore
    . It's been a phase out, that's been happening for a couple of years and is no surprise

    Not a surprise. But doesn't change what a statement it is.

    I don't know. I see windows server having an update strategy like Windows 10. We aren't expecting a Windows 11 anytime soon.

    Plus Microsoft has been pushing for Linux really hard for a couple years now. Right around the time of phasing out of these certs.

    They've been really SQL for Linux especially. Since SQL is a very profitable product line, this is interesting and shows that they believe linux is a better platform to run their database.



  • So if an individual is studying for the MCSE, should they continue that route or focus on the new MS platform path?



  • @Fredtx in some ways, if someone was already studying for the MCSE, I'd want to continue and get it. Because that's a feather in your cap that you can never get again.



  • @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.

    I feel like this will push techs to not study their products, and perhaps study another OS such as Redhat or Ubuntu.



  • @Fredtx said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.

    I feel like this will push techs to not study their products, and perhaps study another OS such as Redhat or Ubuntu.

    I think Microsoft's thinking here is that techs don't deploy and manage MS products. But rather managers and IT buyers do. Microsoft's product line is aimed at selling to management, not IT.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @Fredtx said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.

    I feel like this will push techs to not study their products, and perhaps study another OS such as Redhat or Ubuntu.

    I think Microsoft's thinking here is that techs don't deploy and manage MS products. But rather managers and IT buyers do. Microsoft's product line is aimed at selling to management, not IT.

    I’m more referring to the education/self-learning paths for 2020 for techs. Managers/IT Buyers may not decide to buy these other products for a few years.



  • @Fredtx said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @scottalanmiller said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @Fredtx said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Certifications by Microsoft are just a way of having getting professionals to push their products. Subscription based products are much more profitable then Windows Server.

    I feel like this will push techs to not study their products, and perhaps study another OS such as Redhat or Ubuntu.

    I think Microsoft's thinking here is that techs don't deploy and manage MS products. But rather managers and IT buyers do. Microsoft's product line is aimed at selling to management, not IT.

    I’m more referring to the education/self-learning paths for 2020 for techs. Managers/IT Buyers may not decide to buy these other products for a few years.

    My point is just that Microsoft doesn't see their products and education path as being targeted at IT. So they are happy to have IT people not study their products, as their products are targeted at that audience. I bet you'll find that IT is driving extremely little Microsoft purchasing these days.



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  • @Fredtx said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    I personally made a decision a few weeks ago to start putting my studying into the RHCA as opposed to the MCSA. For one, Linux seems to be more fun as I've been playing with it in my home lab, and two, there is not that many people who know Linux. Glad I made that decision.

    Yup, plenty of Linux jobs / roles out there for sure!

    Do exactly what you enjoy!



  • What certifications exist still for folk using Windows Server on premise then, or none?



  • I'm sure that they will want consumers eventually paying a subscription for using windows in azure..and will eventually only be a light version shipped with new hardware..want all the bells and whistles of windows, have to go to azure....



  • Of course speculation on my part, could be wrong, but I don't think Microsoft gives a shit about windows on home machines anymore..it's not their main bread and butter anymore



  • The exams are following a career or job role based path.

    Apparently, Microsoft sees a Windows Server administrator type of role as something the market is shifting away from. I see this in the enterprise completely, as anyone touching Windows Server services isn't spending most of their time there. It's all towards or in support of Cloud services. So it makes sense from that perspective. Someone who specializes in AD and associated services will, at least in the enterprise, spend most of their time with it in support of cloud services... making it work with Azure AD, other SaaS integrations, SSO, federation, MDM (LANless based), etc... you get the idea. That can basically be said regarding any traditional Windows Server based services.

    However, I do see the point in that many SMBs only have a few Windows Servers and needs someone who specializes in basically what the old Server 2012-2016 server infrastructure MCSA/MCSEs covered because that's all they'll do there. But for how long? Who knows.... but what matters is that you realize what it is you want to do and how long you want to do it.

    The market has been, and is, shifting. Embrace it now to stay ahead, move away completely from MS, or play catch up later. Up to you.

    The new Azure role based certs have these levels:

    Fundamentals
    Associate
    Expert
    Specialty

    And what they cover reflect the job roles in the markets Microsoft obviously makes the most money from, future thinking in mind. Could they update the Server Infrastructure MCSA/MCSE path to 2019? Sure. (but what you are thinking of in those BARELY changes... most that stuff is the same as it was since 2008R2!) Even with 2012 R2, in those cert paths were starting to get a little "Cloud-y" back then. ESPECIALLY with 2016. At some point, you need to draw the line and cut them away. And in Microsoft's eyes, that time has come, I see it too, as well as many others.

    Maybe Jim-Bob working at Kathy's Suburban Dentistry who keeps their 15-device Windows environment running on the single Windows Server they have in the closet may never see anything for awhile. But at some point, he may need to configure their new Dentistry SaaS app authentication via AzureAD from AADSync or some other means. Maybe not, but just trying to make a simple point. Or better yet, he may not even want to be there long enough and wants to move on to greener pastures.

    But really, that's not what MS is creating their Certifications for. There's a much bigger market than that, and it totally makes sense to do what they are doing.



  • @Obsolesce said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    The exams are following a career or job role based path.

    Apparently, Microsoft sees a Windows Server administrator type of role as something the market is shifting away from. I see this in the enterprise completely, as anyone touching Windows Server services isn't spending most of their time there. It's all towards or in support of Cloud services. So it makes sense from that perspective. Someone who specializes in AD and associated services will, at least in the enterprise, spend most of their time with it in support of cloud services... making it work with Azure AD, other SaaS integrations, SSO, federation, MDM (LANless based), etc... you get the idea. That can basically be said regarding any traditional Windows Server based services.

    However, I do see the point in that many SMBs only have a few Windows Servers and needs someone who specializes in basically what the old Server 2012-2016 server infrastructure MCSA/MCSEs covered because that's all they'll do there. But for how long? Who knows.... but what matters is that you realize what it is you want to do and how long you want to do it.

    The market has been, and is, shifting. Embrace it now to stay ahead, move away completely from MS, or play catch up later. Up to you.

    The new Azure role based certs have these levels:

    Fundamentals
    Associate
    Expert
    Specialty

    And what they cover reflect the job roles in the markets Microsoft obviously makes the most money from, future thinking in mind. Could they update the Server Infrastructure MCSA/MCSE path to 2019? Sure. (but what you are thinking of in those BARELY changes... most that stuff is the same as it was since 2008R2!) Even with 2012 R2, in those cert paths were starting to get a little "Cloud-y" back then. ESPECIALLY with 2016. At some point, you need to draw the line and cut them away. And in Microsoft's eyes, that time has come, I see it too, as well as many others.

    Maybe Jim-Bob working at Kathy's Suburban Dentistry who keeps their 15-device Windows environment running on the single Windows Server they have in the closet may never see anything for awhile. But at some point, he may need to configure their new Dentistry SaaS app authentication via AzureAD from AADSync or some other means. Maybe not, but just trying to make a simple point. Or better yet, he may not even want to be there long enough and wants to move on to greener pastures.

    But really, that's not what MS is creating their Certifications for. There's a much bigger market than that, and it totally makes sense to do what they are doing.

    I have always found cloud services to be extremely costly. Seems like a bad news for us IT folk IMHO.



  • @Jimmy9008 said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @Obsolesce said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    The exams are following a career or job role based path.

    Apparently, Microsoft sees a Windows Server administrator type of role as something the market is shifting away from. I see this in the enterprise completely, as anyone touching Windows Server services isn't spending most of their time there. It's all towards or in support of Cloud services. So it makes sense from that perspective. Someone who specializes in AD and associated services will, at least in the enterprise, spend most of their time with it in support of cloud services... making it work with Azure AD, other SaaS integrations, SSO, federation, MDM (LANless based), etc... you get the idea. That can basically be said regarding any traditional Windows Server based services.

    However, I do see the point in that many SMBs only have a few Windows Servers and needs someone who specializes in basically what the old Server 2012-2016 server infrastructure MCSA/MCSEs covered because that's all they'll do there. But for how long? Who knows.... but what matters is that you realize what it is you want to do and how long you want to do it.

    The market has been, and is, shifting. Embrace it now to stay ahead, move away completely from MS, or play catch up later. Up to you.

    The new Azure role based certs have these levels:

    Fundamentals
    Associate
    Expert
    Specialty

    And what they cover reflect the job roles in the markets Microsoft obviously makes the most money from, future thinking in mind. Could they update the Server Infrastructure MCSA/MCSE path to 2019? Sure. (but what you are thinking of in those BARELY changes... most that stuff is the same as it was since 2008R2!) Even with 2012 R2, in those cert paths were starting to get a little "Cloud-y" back then. ESPECIALLY with 2016. At some point, you need to draw the line and cut them away. And in Microsoft's eyes, that time has come, I see it too, as well as many others.

    Maybe Jim-Bob working at Kathy's Suburban Dentistry who keeps their 15-device Windows environment running on the single Windows Server they have in the closet may never see anything for awhile. But at some point, he may need to configure their new Dentistry SaaS app authentication via AzureAD from AADSync or some other means. Maybe not, but just trying to make a simple point. Or better yet, he may not even want to be there long enough and wants to move on to greener pastures.

    But really, that's not what MS is creating their Certifications for. There's a much bigger market than that, and it totally makes sense to do what they are doing.

    I have always found cloud services to be extremely costly. Seems like a bad news for us IT folk IMHO.

    Cloud services have been proven cheaper for companies for a long time.

    The more skilled the IT professional is the more efficient they can design a cloud environment. It's actually better for IT professionals that are plugged in because they become more valuable to their company or customers.



  • @IRJ said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @Jimmy9008 said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    @Obsolesce said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    The exams are following a career or job role based path.

    Apparently, Microsoft sees a Windows Server administrator type of role as something the market is shifting away from. I see this in the enterprise completely, as anyone touching Windows Server services isn't spending most of their time there. It's all towards or in support of Cloud services. So it makes sense from that perspective. Someone who specializes in AD and associated services will, at least in the enterprise, spend most of their time with it in support of cloud services... making it work with Azure AD, other SaaS integrations, SSO, federation, MDM (LANless based), etc... you get the idea. That can basically be said regarding any traditional Windows Server based services.

    However, I do see the point in that many SMBs only have a few Windows Servers and needs someone who specializes in basically what the old Server 2012-2016 server infrastructure MCSA/MCSEs covered because that's all they'll do there. But for how long? Who knows.... but what matters is that you realize what it is you want to do and how long you want to do it.

    The market has been, and is, shifting. Embrace it now to stay ahead, move away completely from MS, or play catch up later. Up to you.

    The new Azure role based certs have these levels:

    Fundamentals
    Associate
    Expert
    Specialty

    And what they cover reflect the job roles in the markets Microsoft obviously makes the most money from, future thinking in mind. Could they update the Server Infrastructure MCSA/MCSE path to 2019? Sure. (but what you are thinking of in those BARELY changes... most that stuff is the same as it was since 2008R2!) Even with 2012 R2, in those cert paths were starting to get a little "Cloud-y" back then. ESPECIALLY with 2016. At some point, you need to draw the line and cut them away. And in Microsoft's eyes, that time has come, I see it too, as well as many others.

    Maybe Jim-Bob working at Kathy's Suburban Dentistry who keeps their 15-device Windows environment running on the single Windows Server they have in the closet may never see anything for awhile. But at some point, he may need to configure their new Dentistry SaaS app authentication via AzureAD from AADSync or some other means. Maybe not, but just trying to make a simple point. Or better yet, he may not even want to be there long enough and wants to move on to greener pastures.

    But really, that's not what MS is creating their Certifications for. There's a much bigger market than that, and it totally makes sense to do what they are doing.

    I have always found cloud services to be extremely costly. Seems like a bad news for us IT folk IMHO.

    Cloud services have been proven cheaper for companies for a long time.

    The more skilled the IT professional is the more efficient they can design a cloud environment. It's actually better for IT professionals that are plugged in because they become more valuable to their company or customers.

    Whenever I have looked at this for our environment it just does not work out less. Owning our own server over the several years we have them costs drastically less. I have to hire IT services to manage on site, or cloud, so those costs are negligible. But, a server I own compared to one I hire for 6 years in Azure, is a lot less.



  • Another thing to keep on mind is that for MS Partners to achieve competencies Azure based certs will now be required, which is another way MS is trying to give the market a push.



  • @flaxking said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Another thing to keep on mind is that for MS Partners to achieve competencies Azure based certs will now be required, which is another way MS is trying to give the market a push.

    We are partners and need to keep a load of certifications on developers to get certain benefits. But these changes seem a little much for my infrastructure folk. Why would I want to certify for Azure when we don't really use Azure. We use Windows server on-premise. If that is going to go away someday I would rather get Linux and slowly migrate out software to work locally with that rather than get our folk Azure certified when we wont be using it.

    I expect MS are phasing out the on premise OS, pushing people to certify for Azure, then once on Azure, slowly push the prices up more.





  • @Jimmy9008 said in Microsoft plans on retiring the MCSA,MCSD,MCSE certifications in June 30,2020:

    Why would I want to certify for Azure when we don't really use Azure.

    Right? Zero training or certs for the huge majority of the industry that can't use Azure. And what about Windows on non-Azure, but still cloud? It seems like MS sees Azure as a Linux hosting platform and that Windows proper is at a dead end. That there is no cert or professional path for Windows as an OS really feels like a form of an announcement.


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