Bandwidth Issues



  • I've got an issue with our main office in the US and was wondering if anyone has run into something similar.

    Here goes:

    We've got a 1G symmetrical link however are only able saturate / fully utilize the line with MASSIVELY parallel streams. iperf3 testing requires upwards of -P 60 to get sustained throughput to / from iperf.he.net within acceptable / expected ranges. My experience to date is that 10 to 20 streams should be more than sufficient to saturate a link.

    I've got a sneaking suspicion that someone along the path is throttling / shaping or otherwise rate-limiting individual streams but all of my inquiries in this regard have been met with flat denials / indications that there's nothing of the sort happening on the line.

    Has anyone got a test or diagnostic in mind that I can run to pinpoint / prove that our connection is being messed with? Alternatively, does anyone know of a way to run a secure site-to-site link that can basically "parallelize" the link?



  • Who is the carrier? and what is the firewall? What other equipment between you and the internet connection?



  • @Dashrender said in Bandwidth Issues:
    Who is the carrier?

    Granite / WOW

    and what is the firewall?

    Fortigate 101E (Tech was onsite yesterday and tested direct with their DEMARC, same results)

    What other equipment between you and the internet connection?

    There's an ISP supplied Cisco CPE of some sort that's been swapped out with the current round of troubleshooting and diagnostics.



  • @notverypunny said in Bandwidth Issues:

    @Dashrender said in Bandwidth Issues:

    Fortigate 101E (Tech was onsite yesterday and tested direct with their DEMARC, same results)

    Do you have a bunch of services turned on? Based on the spec sheet it looks like basic throughput is fine with your 1Gbps connection. Once you turn on services, throughput seems to drop drastically.



  • Theoretically there could be a link aggregator somewhere down the line that is putting loads of smaller connections together to create this effect by accident.


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