AzureAD and shares



  • They only use the MS accounts to sign in to the PCs (most by using a pin) and for Outlook. They have no idea what the directory is or what it is for. They want "cloud" access but LAN access too.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    . Their PCs are not "joined" to AzureAD but their user accounts reflect this. Should they be joined?

    He might not "need" this. Because his SaaS apps and azure VMs can connect to Azure AD itself. In a full cloud environment there may be little reason to have PCs domain joined. Especially if you aren't storing anything locally.

    You could just blow away PC if there is even the slightest of any issue. Also, you could utilize Linux , Chrome OS , or Mac in your environment with ease.

    You can also use Microsoft Intune to control Windows and Mac to a certain extent.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    They want "cloud" access but LAN access too.

    Cloud access to what? Län access to what?



  • Move everything to Sharepoint or OneDrive for Business. That would make the most sense in this case.



  • "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.

    OneDrive for Business... if they are already using AzureAD they probably already have a license for it.



  • @coliver They tried OneDrive and had a ton of trouble. They were constantly calling MS support to recover folders and files that were deleted in the middle of the night, when nobody was at their office. Folders were moved into random places.

    It is VERY possible that it was user error on each occasion but the logs did not reflect that. They lost a ton of files too that had to be recovered from a backup. I will say that I have read about other occasions with similar results.

    Isn't there a 1Tb limit on OneDrive? They are trying to use a single OneDrive account as a "file server".



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.

    What kind of files and purposes?

    ODFB is rarely the needed or correct solution to ideas like that.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.

    So don't call it cloud, since it isn't anyway.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    Isn't there a 1Tb limit on OneDrive? They are trying to use a single OneDrive account as a "file server".

    That is why they dont know who is deleting shit. Everyone has permission to delete all files...



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @coliver They tried OneDrive and had a ton of trouble. They were constantly calling MS support to recover folders and files that were deleted in the middle of the night, when nobody was at their office. Folders were moved into random places.

    It is VERY possible that it was user error on each occasion but the logs did not reflect that. They lost a ton of files too that had to be recovered from a backup. I will say that I have read about other occasions with similar results.

    If they are using a single OD account, the logs aren't very helpful.



  • @Obsolesce Scenario is this:

    Field techs use analyzers that collect monitoring data. They "sync" the data back to the main office. Each folder is a different job. There is a piece of custom software that takes that data and generates a report. Think of it as a large number of .dat files or raw data files.
    They also store the reports that are generated as .pdf documents and have a large number of MS Office documents. It is less than 2 Tb total but the management is a pain point.

    I added access points and configured a switch for them.... Now I'm getting pulled into a mess that has been pieced together over the years.



  • @scottalanmiller I know. It's hard to break people of bad habits.



  • @IRJ That is exactly the reason they cannot pinpoint all the anomalies to a specific user.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    Field techs use analyzers that collect monitoring data. They "sync" the data back to the main office. Each folder is a different job.

    That smells like a web app using a DB, not at all a file share.



  • @Obsolesce They were using OneDrive for syncing. They 2-way syncs were consuming all of the bandwidth.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @Obsolesce They were using OneDrive for syncing. They 2-way syncs were consuming all of the bandwidth.

    They can use an Azure DB with a web app attached to Azure storage. They can use the web app to track all the data and hold all the files, generate reports, etc. They don't know what they need at all, are trying to use the wrong tool for the wrong job. Plain and simple.



  • Send to database and then back up the database. That's what needs to be done



  • @IRJ @Obsolesce They actually want a DB for this data but keep finding subpar developers and wasting money.



  • @IRJ said in AzureAD and shares:

    @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    Isn't there a 1Tb limit on OneDrive? They are trying to use a single OneDrive account as a "file server".

    That is why they dont know who is deleting shit. Everyone has permission to delete all files...

    Yeah, if they misused SMB shares like that, they'd have the same issues.



  • @coliver said in AzureAD and shares:

    @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.

    OneDrive for Business... if they are already using AzureAD they probably already have a license for it.

    They have O365 - of course they have ODfB licenses. (I'm assuming MS doesn't call pure hosted Exchange O365)



  • @Obsolesce said in AzureAD and shares:

    @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    "Cloud" access to them is being able to access files in the browser. They also want to access the same files and folders locally on the LAN. Trying to pick my battles.

    What kind of files and purposes?

    ODFB is rarely the needed or correct solution to ideas like that.

    And what is? NC? or something totally different?



  • @IRJ said in AzureAD and shares:

    @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @coliver They tried OneDrive and had a ton of trouble. They were constantly calling MS support to recover folders and files that were deleted in the middle of the night, when nobody was at their office. Folders were moved into random places.

    It is VERY possible that it was user error on each occasion but the logs did not reflect that. They lost a ton of files too that had to be recovered from a backup. I will say that I have read about other occasions with similar results.

    If they are using a single OD account, the logs aren't very helpful.

    Exactly - OD isn't the right tool - ODfB is the correct solution.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @Obsolesce Scenario is this:

    Field techs use analyzers that collect monitoring data. They "sync" the data back to the main office. Each folder is a different job. There is a piece of custom software that takes that data and generates a report. Think of it as a large number of .dat files or raw data files.
    They also store the reports that are generated as .pdf documents and have a large number of MS Office documents. It is less than 2 Tb total but the management is a pain point.

    I added access points and configured a switch for them.... Now I'm getting pulled into a mess that has been pieced together over the years.

    How did it it work before they got O365? Does anyone remember? How did those files from the field techs get back to the home office?



  • @Obsolesce said in AzureAD and shares:

    @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @Obsolesce They were using OneDrive for syncing. They 2-way syncs were consuming all of the bandwidth.

    They can use an Azure DB with a web app attached to Azure storage. They can use the web app to track all the data and hold all the files, generate reports, etc. They don't know what they need at all, are trying to use the wrong tool for the wrong job. Plain and simple.

    I'm betting that would take a total rewrite of whatever software they are using.

    They probably have some type of analyzer that generates 'data' - that data is normally transferred to a network share once they are back in the office... then the in-house people can run reports on that data...



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @IRJ @Obsolesce They actually want a DB for this data but keep finding subpar developers and wasting money.

    That should be a NEED not a want.



  • @Dashrender I only know if them using OD. I'd have to ask.



  • @Dashrender

    They probably have some type of analyzer that generates 'data' - that data is normally transferred to a network share once they are back in the office... then the in-house people can run reports on that data...

    This is exactly what happens.



  • @brandon220 said in AzureAD and shares:

    @Dashrender

    They probably have some type of analyzer that generates 'data' - that data is normally transferred to a network share once they are back in the office... then the in-house people can run reports on that data...

    This is exactly what happens.

    I wonder if the analyzer software is what was screwing with OD? The next time you launched the software, it might delete the old location in prep for the new scan?



  • @coliver said in AzureAD and shares:

    Move everything to Sharepoint or OneDrive for Business. That would make the most sense in this case.

    Yeah, Sharepoint is my guess.


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