VM Suggestions? Best Practice?



  • @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    and all I did was simply ask a simple question on which VM software to use ... 😢

    Still I don't think you've decided. If I had a choice in it, it seems like going with Linux and KVM is the better option. And leaving a VM for windows and this job of yours for secondary "when on call". But really your employer needs to supply you with the tools to do the job unless it was stated otherwise at the time of hire.



  • @JaredBusch said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    and all I did was simply ask a simple question on which VM software to use ... 😢

    For all the wrong reasons, obviously.

    Well Apparently.



  • @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    and all I did was simply ask a simple question on which VM software to use ... 😢

    People always say "asked a simple question", but questions are rarely simple. It's like saying "which car should I buy", but in order to answer a "simple question" we have to know why you want a car, your budget, your use cases, what you like, why you are trying to buy it, etc. There are no simple questions, if there were, there would be simple answers and you could look them up without asking. We have to ask because these things are actually rather complex.

    And often, the complexity of a question that was not realized exposes earlier mistakes in thinking that led to asking the question far too late in the process. For example, how did you know what laptop to buy, without having already known what virtualization you were going to run on it? You can't, the virtualization decision does a lot to drive the laptop choice.



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  • @scottalanmiller wrong topic?



  • @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs so now the question is... do you want to keep Windows or do you want to upgrade to Fedora or Ubuntu?

    I will need to have Windows in one way or another ( possible a VM for work- to run the Remote Desktop Tool we use to connect into sites)

    Nothing in either case means you can't have windows. The question is do you need it as the primary desktop or can it be run sas a VM for times that you need windows?

    It can run as a VM for when i need it.

    So uninstall Windows and install Linux, Ubuntu or Fedora and then install KVM and Virtual Machine Manager.

    Create a Windows 10 Home VM and from there you have your portable lab.

    Dual booting is an option that I haven't seen proposed yet. No need to nuke the windows install, just get something with enough drive space and either use the Linux installer or the windows drive management tool to shrink the windows install partition



  • @notverypunny said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs so now the question is... do you want to keep Windows or do you want to upgrade to Fedora or Ubuntu?

    I will need to have Windows in one way or another ( possible a VM for work- to run the Remote Desktop Tool we use to connect into sites)

    Nothing in either case means you can't have windows. The question is do you need it as the primary desktop or can it be run sas a VM for times that you need windows?

    It can run as a VM for when i need it.

    So uninstall Windows and install Linux, Ubuntu or Fedora and then install KVM and Virtual Machine Manager.

    Create a Windows 10 Home VM and from there you have your portable lab.

    Dual booting is an option that I haven't seen proposed yet. No need to nuke the windows install, just get something with enough drive space and either use the Linux installer or the windows drive management tool to shrink the windows install partition

    Dual-Booting while an option for cases where you want to have a permanent installation for both doesn't really fit the bill here since what @WrCombs is looking to do it setup a test environment for one off issues, figure out how to resolve it in the test environment and then tear down the test environment.

    It's not an option for the purposes of looking at hardware to use as a portable lab.



  • @notverypunny said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @DustinB3403 said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    @WrCombs so now the question is... do you want to keep Windows or do you want to upgrade to Fedora or Ubuntu?

    I will need to have Windows in one way or another ( possible a VM for work- to run the Remote Desktop Tool we use to connect into sites)

    Nothing in either case means you can't have windows. The question is do you need it as the primary desktop or can it be run sas a VM for times that you need windows?

    It can run as a VM for when i need it.

    So uninstall Windows and install Linux, Ubuntu or Fedora and then install KVM and Virtual Machine Manager.

    Create a Windows 10 Home VM and from there you have your portable lab.

    Dual booting is an option that I haven't seen proposed yet. No need to nuke the windows install, just get something with enough drive space and either use the Linux installer or the windows drive management tool to shrink the windows install partition

    Dual booting is effectively a dead end outside of very specific situations like a dual purpose video gaming and work machine, and even that is almost dead.

    For a lab or testing, it's not efficient at all, and a lot more work.



  • I would never consider dual boot again, thats a relic of the past. It's much simpler to just use virtualization, and allow both OS's to be on at the same time.



  • For a laptop I would just keep windows 10 on it and run virtualbox for testing.

    If you're testing stuff, doing development and what not, virtualbox is the de-facto standard. It's easy to use shared folders between the host and the VMs do USB pass-through and stuff like that. Sleep on the hosts will also put VMs in sleep.

    If you want to do some more serious stuff I would set up one or more VM hosts on dedicated server hardware.



  • Just got clarification on this, the company offers a " Computer Purchase program"
    Also - We are required to proved a computer / laptop to get online to connect to sites - as discussed during the interview ( which I had a Laptop so i said that it was great.) and agreed to upon - also was offered a Company Phone, or they would pay a portion of the bill.
    I prefer a Laptop - More portable and I can take it with me during the weekends instead of sitting around the house.

    I brought it up as " My laptop is dead, the one I bought is shit. and Im sending it back. Am I required to use personal equipment for on call? "
    and My Boss said " You are required to provide a computer and internet to preform job duties, this was discussed during the interview and hiring process.
    The company will help you buy one and you pay them back over the course of a year. But as I said you are required to provide A way to get online to provide support. "



  • I never thought about it because i had a laptop that worked until it didn't.



  • @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    Just got clarification on this, the company offers a " Computer Purchase program"
    Also - We are required to proved a computer / laptop to get online to connect to sites - as discussed during the interview ( which I had a Laptop so i said that it was great.) and agreed to upon - also was offered a Company Phone, or they would pay a portion of the bill.
    I prefer a Laptop - More portable and I can take it with me during the weekends instead of sitting around the house.

    I brought it up as " My laptop is dead, the one I bought is shit. and Im sending it back. Am I required to use personal equipment for on call? "
    and My Boss said " You are required to provide a computer and internet to preform job duties, this was discussed during the interview and hiring process.
    The company will help you buy one and you pay them back over the course of a year. But as I said you are required to provide A way to get online to provide support. "

    This is extremely common. Most people ignore it because most people have computers at home. What they easily didn't tell you was that it needed to be Windows. but maybe they did, but places overlook that one a LOT.

    But needing to provide a computer, Internet connection, car, etc. are super common things for jobs to require and it is totally legal in nearly all states and definitely federally. Just like you have to provide your own clothes and whatever. Certain things are considered "basic things" and it is not a hardship to require access to them. Especially when they are not consumables (ink, paper, etc.)



  • @WrCombs said in VM Suggestions? Best Practice?:

    I never thought about it because i had a laptop that worked until it didn't.

    Most people don't. Especially in IT, we never consider the possibility of someone not having a computer (or many) at home.



  • @LilAng doesn't really have a computer at home, either!