New Tablet Search



  • Having an older iPad and an older Samsung Tablet, It's time to consolidate, and get one device..

    So which one. We've had many a discussion here, in separate threads over which to go with. And before anything is mentioned about a ChromeBook - I"m looking for a tablet. They have their place.. but just don't think it's what I want.

    So that being said

    • iPAD
    • Samsung
    • Chuwi
    • Huawei

    For me, the iPAD is out due to cost...

    @scottalanmiller and I have discussed the use needs, and several of the programs I intend to use are Android based, so really Android is more in line with future planning.

    Also will need the TFT or microSD card expansion...

    IIRC - @IRJ got a device - but I can't recall what it was right off. That could be an option depending on how it is working out for him after a year or so of use.



  • @gjacobse said in New Tablet Search:

    @scottalanmiller and I have discussed the use needs, and several of the programs I intend to use are Android based, so really Android is more in line with future planning.

    But also in those discussions we mentioned that Android is leaving the tablet game and Android apps native home is now ChromeOS. Android is focused now on phones, not tablets. Android tablets will dominate this space for a year or two, but ChromeOS tablet(s) are out and run Android apps. So while not necessarily the primary place to look yet, Android apps does not logically lead to Android tablets as an answer.

    Acer ChromeBook Tab 10 is ~$349 and runs Android apps, and Linux apps.



  • @scottalanmiller said in New Tablet Search:

    @gjacobse said in New Tablet Search:

    @scottalanmiller and I have discussed the use needs, and several of the programs I intend to use are Android based, so really Android is more in line with future planning.

    But also in those discussions we mentioned that Android is leaving the tablet game and Android apps native home is now ChromeOS. Android is focused now on phones, not tablets. Android tablets will dominate this space for a year or two, but ChromeOS tablet(s) are out and run Android apps. So while not necessarily the primary place to look yet, Android apps does not logically lead to Android tablets as an answer.

    Acer ChromeBook Tab 10 is ~$349 and runs Android apps, and Linux apps.

    That is true - having over extended myself - i've forgotten more than one thing in the last few weeks.

    Amazon is not listing some of the specs on it,.. so off to ACER to review. The price - while in between Chuwi and iPAD (low end) - it's doable.



  • For kids, I think it is likely a decent choice. Loads of power, good size, Android apps PLUS the full power of a laptop, and a stylus with a Wacom drawing feature.



  • @scottalanmiller said in New Tablet Search:

    For kids, I think it is likely a decent choice. Loads of power, good size, Android apps PLUS the full power of a laptop, and a stylus with a Wacom drawing feature.

    The kids each have iPADs newer than mine and with more storage. This would be for me, and used as a replacement, and for travel... like in two weeks going to Chicago. My Dell 2n1 Laptop would work fine... but kind of weighty...



  • Well then, perfect for your own doodling 😉



  • Amazon doesn't list some of the specs I'm looking for... and seemingly - neither does ACER.

    0_1538239755960_Screenshot from 2018-09-29 12-48-24.png

    Does it have OTG? microSD card slot? If it's 4GB 32GB - where is the 32GB??



  • @gjacobse said in New Tablet Search:

    Does it have OTG? microSD card slot? If it's 4GB 32GB - where is the 32GB??

    4GB RAM, 32GB SSD

    Memory vs. Storage



  • @gjacobse said in New Tablet Search:

    microSD card slot?

    MicroSD is a "memory card."

    Specs say "memory card reader: yes"

    COULD be full sized SD, but not likely.



  • @gjacobse said in New Tablet Search:

    Does it have OTG?

    Of course not, that would make no sense. There is a reason you can't find the spec, it's a silly spec to ask for. It's like asking where the specs are as to how many moon pies come with it. Obviously the answer is zero, no one would want a moon pie with their tablet.

    Why do you care if there is OTG?



  • List price is actually $329.

    PCM should have it in stock. Might be a few bucks cheaper.



  • @scottalanmiller and @gjacobse : Yes, it does support OTG --
    Acer has included a USB-C port for charging and data transfer as well as display extending



  • @scottalanmiller said in New Tablet Search:

    List price is actually $329.

    PCM should have it in stock. Might be a few bucks cheaper.

    PCM? Not familar with that one. Of course it might in Rocket along with the MEME i'm still trying to find...



  • @manxam said in New Tablet Search:

    @scottalanmiller and @gjacobse : Yes, it does support OTG --
    Acer has included a USB-C port for charging and data transfer as well as display extending

    That's called OTG? That's just normal, every day USB. Nothing special about it.



  • @scottalanmiller : OTG essentially refers to the ability to connect a device via USB as opposed to the USB port providing only power and the ability to have the phone transfer data with it.

    Phones and tablets had USB connectors for years before you could actually connect a mouse, keyboard, or USB flash drive to them.

    Only relatively new Android phones (~3 years?) support OTG -- the ability to have the phone act as a flash storage device when connected to a PC OR allow one to read the contents of a USB flash drive plugged into that port (or keyboard, mouse, or usb-to-ethernet adapter).

    So yeah, OTG is basically just "every day USB" from the standpoint of a computer, but on a mobile device or tablet is referenced as OTG.

    From Wikipedia:

    Standard USB uses a master/slave architecture; a host acts as the master device for the entire bus, and a USB device acts as a slave. If implementing standard USB, devices must assume one role or the other, with computers generally set up as hosts, while (for example) printers normally function as slaves. In the absence of USB OTG, cell phones often implemented slave functionality to allow easy transfer of data to and from computers. Such phones, as slaves, could not readily be connected to printers as they also implemented the slave role. USB OTG directly addresses this issue.



  • @manxam said in New Tablet Search:

    @scottalanmiller : OTG essentially refers to the ability to connect a device via USB as opposed to the USB port providing only power and the ability to have the phone transfer data with it.

    Phones and tablets had USB connectors for years before you could actually connect a mouse, keyboard, or USB flash drive to them.

    Only relatively new Android phones (~3 years?) support OTG -- the ability to have the phone act as a flash storage device when connected to a PC OR allow one to read the contents of a USB flash drive plugged into that port (or keyboard, mouse, or usb-to-ethernet adapter).

    So yeah, OTG is basically just "every day USB" from the standpoint of a computer, but on a mobile device or tablet is referenced as OTG.

    From Wikipedia:

    Standard USB uses a master/slave architecture; a host acts as the master device for the entire bus, and a USB device acts as a slave. If implementing standard USB, devices must assume one role or the other, with computers generally set up as hosts, while (for example) printers normally function as slaves. In the absence of USB OTG, cell phones often implemented slave functionality to allow easy transfer of data to and from computers. Such phones, as slaves, could not readily be connected to printers as they also implemented the slave role. USB OTG directly addresses this issue.

    Yeah, I get all that. But this is definitely just "normal USB", as it is a normal computer. Concepts unique to mobility don't apply here. So either OTG is a reference to all USB, or it's not applicable here. You would never call the USB port on your laptop or desktop OTG, and unless you do, you don't here.



  • @scottalanmiller said in New Tablet Search:

    Yeah, I get all that. But this is definitely just "normal USB", as it is a normal computer. Concepts unique to mobility don't apply here. So either OTG is a reference to all USB, or it's not applicable here. You would never call the USB port on your laptop or desktop OTG, and unless you do, you don't here.

    But it's not a normal computer, it's a hybrid tablet running a Mobile/Tablet only OS utilizing a similar architecture to Android but with Chrome as it's UI instead of android.view/android.webkit.



  • @manxam said in New Tablet Search:

    @scottalanmiller said in New Tablet Search:

    Yeah, I get all that. But this is definitely just "normal USB", as it is a normal computer. Concepts unique to mobility don't apply here. So either OTG is a reference to all USB, or it's not applicable here. You would never call the USB port on your laptop or desktop OTG, and unless you do, you don't here.

    But it's not a normal computer, it's a hybrid tablet running a Mobile/Tablet only OS utilizing a similar architecture to Android but with Chrome as it's UI instead of android.view/android.webkit.

    Not really, it's running a desktop OS, ChromeOS. It's not similar to Android at all, it is in fact nothing but a normal laptop with no included keyboard. It's as much a desktop style device as any desktop you'd ever use. That the form factor is called a tablet is misleading, it would be like calling an iMac a tablet... the only difference between the two is one has a stand included, and one doesn't.

    There is nothing "mobile" about this device. Other than it is easy to be mobile with it. Under the hood, it's identical to some of the world's most popular laptops, just with a keyboard sold separately.


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