Help with my first Hyper-V setup



  • @lj I went to Windows Admin Center-Users and Groups. deleted my user. Added my user with full domain name and password. Added that user to the HOST's local administrators. Still don't have permission.



  • I closed Windows Admin Center. re-opened and selected host then manage as and checked use my Windows account. Do I have to log off my Win10 machine or reboot the Host or anything?



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    Now instead of You do not have access rights to Logical Disk Manager on..I am getting "unable to connect to virtual disk service"

    Try this:
    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_vista-hardware/cant-start-disk-management-unable-to-connect-to/31898500-9d84-4cb5-9ba3-c1f42e3b1ace



  • @obsolesce I read the MS thread. VDS was running and set to manual but I restarted it anyway. Still don't have permission. I went back to Groups and added myself to Remote Management Users.



  • @obsolesce I didn't run the file checker.



  • Now I can't open Services within Computer Management. I could before all these changes listed above. No big deal. I can open it from Windows Admin Center. All part of my education.



  • @lj I tried going to Remote desktop and logging in with my domain user and password. "The connection was denied because the user account is not authorized for remote login".



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj I tried going to Remote desktop and logging in with my domain user and password. "The connection was denied because the user account is not authorized for remote login".

    You have to be part of the Remote Desktop Users group or Administrators group.



  • @lj I went to Windows Admin Center and added the user to Remote Desktop Users and Remote Management Users. the user is a member of local administrators also.



  • @lj Still can't connect to Disk Management or Services.



  • @lj Restarted the Host. Went over to login locally as other user and succeeded. the Server config window does not come up. Another light blue screen comes up and says" C:\Windows\System32\Script.exe.
    The specified service does not exist as an installed service.

    I thought maybe I just need to log in and out once locally with the domain user.



  • @lj Just had a thought. Domain group policies may be a factor.



  • @lj Can;t find anything so far. I have a lot of additional path rules to keep undesired applications from being run by domain users but I don't think that is it. They have never stopped my user before.



  • @lj I logged in to the Host with the domain administrator and password. I was able to log in and Sconfig came right up.



  • @lj I switched user on my Win10 PC and logged in as the domain admin. Services and Disk Management came right up. This is a work around and of course I couldn't get disk management to do what I wanted with the volume sizes. If I blow away my Host OS and reinstall I will have to all of this over, I guess that is how I will learn.



  • @lj headed to a branch library and then home. Will be at another library system on Monday. I'll try my host rebuild Tuesday morning if I can and start asking questions again.
    Thanks for all the knowledge so far.



  • @lj I have reinstalled the Host with a bigger partition, added it to the domain, got all the Hyper-V manager, remote disk management and Windows Admin Center connected, restored the 2 test VMs with Altaro and everything is working. I used Disk2VHD to virtual a Win7 machine then briefly got it running on the Host.
    Keeping in mind that I am still learning, what should be my next step? Perhaps another install of Hyper-V on a desktop and moving VMs back and forth?



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj I have reinstalled the Host with a bigger partition, added it to the domain, got all the Hyper-V manager, remote disk management and Windows Admin Center connected, restored the 2 test VMs with Altaro and everything is working. I used Disk2VHD to virtual a Win7 machine then briefly got it running on the Host.
    Keeping in mind that I am still learning, what should be my next step? Perhaps another install of Hyper-V on a desktop and moving VMs back and forth?

    While migration is a feature you can use, it isn't something you are likely to do often; and not something you can do more than every 90 unless you are licensed for it.



  • As for what you should do next I can't really say. There is a lot that could be done, and a lot that really won't ever come up.



  • @jaredbusch said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @obsolesce The Win10 is and the HyperV host is not.

    Why not? This does nothing but over complicate your set. You already have an AD environment. why are you not leveraging it?

    Is there ever an issue when the AD server is on the Hyper-V host?

    I've never had an issue ... just wondering. Mainly the other day because I was having an issue logging in until (I think) the AD server came back up on the host.

    Does a Hyper-V server let you log in if something is wrong with the AD server it is hosting? (Obviously this would only be applicable in a one AD server environment. Or is both AD servers were on the same Hyper-V host.)



  • @brrabill said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @jaredbusch said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @obsolesce The Win10 is and the HyperV host is not.

    Why not? This does nothing but over complicate your set. You already have an AD environment. why are you not leveraging it?

    Is there ever an issue when the AD server is on the Hyper-V host?

    I've never had an issue ... just wondering. Mainly the other day because I was having an issue logging in until (I think) the AD server came back up on the host.

    Does a Hyper-V server let you log in if something is wrong with the AD server it is hosting? (Obviously this would only be applicable in a one AD server environment. Or is both AD servers were on the same Hyper-V host.)

    Cache Credentials makes its possible to login when AD is not available. And you can always login locally.



  • @brrabill said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @jaredbusch said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @obsolesce The Win10 is and the HyperV host is not.

    Why not? This does nothing but over complicate your set. You already have an AD environment. why are you not leveraging it?

    Is there ever an issue when the AD server is on the Hyper-V host?

    I've never had an issue ... just wondering. Mainly the other day because I was having an issue logging in until (I think) the AD server came back up on the host.

    Does a Hyper-V server let you log in if something is wrong with the AD server it is hosting? (Obviously this would only be applicable in a one AD server environment. Or is both AD servers were on the same Hyper-V host.)

    Simple answer is, yes you could have issues, but in reality you would also have the local creds (assuming you recorded them somewhere) and two cache credentials are your friends.

    To work around AD related issues you could go down the path of a second hypervisor with a second AD server running there so you always have 1 AD up and running between restarts, updates etc.


  • Service Provider

    @black3dynamite and @DustinB3403 are correct.

    1. You have the existing AD login cached from your last login.
    2. You have the local admin account that existed prior to joining the domain.

    The local admin account should be enough for you to log in locally, and use powershell to get your AD server back online.



  • Maybe it saw the AD server up, but it was just in a window it wasn't accepting requests or something.

    It definitely said "no logon server" but then the next time, worked fine.



  • @brrabill said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    Maybe it saw the AD server up, but it was just in a window it wasn't accepting requests or something.

    It definitely said "no logon server" but then the next time, worked fine.

    That easily could've been due to services still starting up or any other number of items. But AD as a VM on Hyper-V with Hyper-V joined to the domain it's running is perfectly fine.



  • @dustinb3403 That's a good point. I think I would need another set of licenses with a possible exception in an emergency.
    Maybe I will quit stalling and go ahead and and start using the server. I should have a fair amount of time next week.