ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?



  • hi,

    due to some limitations in our current wired cabling, I'm in need to find some good wifi receiver to plug into a switch for some pcs/printers located in our warehouses.

    My mind has gone directly to ubiquiti but I have lost myself into their product list. Basically: is there anything which acts opposite to an unifi access point, sort of unifi receiver?!

    this will be plugged into a switch to give connection to a pc and a couple of zebra printers. Layout should be reproduced for an small number of positions both distants and close to each other (say min. every 3 mts/10fts.)

    thanx!



  • @matteo-nunziati said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    hi,

    due to some limitations in our current wired cabling, I'm in need to find some good wifi receiver to plug into a switch for some pcs/printers located in our warehouses.

    My mind has gone directly to ubiquiti but I have lost myself into their product list. Basically: is there anything which acts opposite to an unifi access point, sort of unifi receiver?!

    this will be plugged into a switch to give connection to a pc and a couple of zebra printers. Layout should be reproduced for an small number of positions both distants and close to each other (say min. every 3 mts/10fts.)

    thanx!

    The Unifi APs can act in a mesh network.



  • For indoor use and at those distances, @coliver may have the best idea. But each mesh hop drops bandwidth by about 50% so keep that in mind.


  • Service Provider

    I think you are looking for a wireless bridge.



  • I think every AP they have can work in bridge mode. I have 2 Nanostations M5 between 2 buildings, in bridge mode, but each can connect to any wifi in range.



  • Have you looked at getting pricing on a wire (or two) run? Depending on what you're manufacturing it may be a good idea to go that direction.


  • Service Provider

    @coliver said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    Have you looked at getting pricing on a wire (or two) run? Depending on what you're manufacturing it may be a good idea to go that direction.

    Fiber run, not copper.



  • @JaredBusch said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    @coliver said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    Have you looked at getting pricing on a wire (or two) run? Depending on what you're manufacturing it may be a good idea to go that direction.

    Fiber run, not copper.

    Huh? Properly shielded copper would work in most cases and you wouldn't need to drop the extra money on SFP modules and fiber.



  • @coliver said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    ooked at getting pricing on a wire (or two) run?

    they are "islands" in the middle of the warehouse. 10 of them in a warehouse, paired. so 5 places.
    in the second werehouse I've 1 island in the middle of nothing (just cantilevers), finally another island close to a sawing machine in the third warehouse.

    we are talking about tens of meters of wiring in places where re-layout can happen on a 5 year basis. I'm quite dubious about beating the price of a wireless setup with wired setup.

    giga eth with cat.6 should be ok (100 mt max), anyway the better solution would be to follow electric lines, to avoid installing/buying additional materials, therefore fiber should be actually. So @coliver is right in general but @JaredBusch suggestion would be the better option considering the additional cost of € /manhour.

    But then this includes installing optic panels, switches with gbics... mmm something like 7 receivers shouldn't be beatable in price, IF I find some receiver for short distances...

    APs are already in place in the warehouses so only receivers are required. Current experiments are running on these object setup as receiver: they are ok at 40 bucks but honestly it is just an off the shelf solution acquired for 40 € and delivered in 3 days. Just this. Can't rely on something similar for long...

    At least I would like to rely on something supported by a community. This stuff is just sell-and-goodbye! even firmware: while really nice for the price point, I cannot say anything about security (lack of.)

    @scottalanmiller , yes this is to be a sort of short radious wifi bridging.
    @marcinozga , ubiquity officially do not support Station mode on unifi, just airmax. At least according to some posts in their official forum.

    EDIT

    some unofficial workarounds exist.


  • Service Provider

    If it was just printers I wouldn't think twice about just using some APs in bridged mode. For PCs I would make sure their (the users) expectations are set correctly and make sure you don't have a some database application that is real sensitive to latency running on the link. As cheap as it is to try, I would try it for one set up and then do the rest if it meets their expectations.



  • @Mike-Davis no db intensive task! just connect to the ERP to print some stickers for the packaging. yes they recall an order (some records) but it is really lightweight.



  • @marcinozga said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    I think every AP they have can work in bridge mode. I have 2 Nanostations M5 between 2 buildings, in bridge mode, but each can connect to any wifi in range.

    These babies work really well. Check out a project I was part of with bridging between buildings - https://community.spiceworks.com/people/networknerd/projects/wireless-bridge-between-warehouses.



  • @marcinozga said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    I think every AP they have can work in bridge mode. I have 2 Nanostations M5 between 2 buildings, in bridge mode, but each can connect to any wifi in range.

    I suppose M5 as overkill/worthless for my needs. Am I wrong?


  • Service Provider

    @Mike-Davis said in ubiquiti indoor wifi receiver, any?:

    If it was just printers I wouldn't think twice about just using some APs in bridged mode. For PCs I would make sure their (the users) expectations are set correctly and make sure you don't have a some database application that is real sensitive to latency running on the link. As cheap as it is to try, I would try it for one set up and then do the rest if it meets their expectations.

    Depending on the units, you can get really good latency on wireless links. but you need good ones. Some people argue that it beats wired. it doesn't, but it's good enough that people start to imagine that it does.


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