KeePass/LastPass versus Excel



  • So, I used to keep passwords in an Excel file, which was pretty dumb. I now use KeePass, which is pretty smart, right?

    However, I've just found out that since 2010, Excel now offers proper encryption, (I discovered this when searching for a way to crack a password protected spreadsheet).

    So, I'm wondering about going back to using Excel. Any views?



  • Excel should work fine. My only thought is.... is there any benefit to Excel over KeePass? KeePass is free and really well suited to storing passwords. Might not be worth switching away from Excel necessarily anymore, but not sure that there would be much value to switching back.



  • The main benefit is that you can massively customise Excel according to your needs.

    At the moment, I only run KeePass on my PCs, and store the files on a Microsoft OneDrive account for syncing across devices. I don't use password management on my iPhone or iPad. I need to try MiniKeePass for iOS, but haven't got round to it and I'm not sure if it would work with my OneDrive file location?



  • @Carnival-Boy said:

    The main benefit is that you can massively customise Excel according to your needs.

    At the moment, I only run KeePass on my PCs, and store the files on a Microsoft OneDrive account for syncing across devices. I don't use password management on my iPhone or iPad. I need to try MiniKeePass for iOS, but haven't got round to it and I'm not sure if it would work with my OneDrive file location?

    Haven't tried it either, but it might. OneDrive works well on iOS.



  • I would not switch back to excel if you have made the switch to keepass. Why spend the time customizing excel when you have an application DESIGNED for dealing with strong passwords and keeping them safe.

    I have never used KeePass past a short test to compare it with LastPass a long time ago. It worked well, but I wanted something I did not have to manage so LastPass was a better choice to me. With improvement in things like OneDrive, DropBox and such, that will make KeePass a much more flexible tool than it was in the past.
    Besides for USD $12 a year I really cannot complain that the cost is too much to bear for the convenience, because it is not.



  • How good is the encryption? Also, if someone gets a copy of the file they can try to brute force the password at their leisure, whereas LastPass keeps it on their servers.

    Why not just put it in a text file and encrypt the whole disk instead?



  • @Nic said:

    How good is the encryption? Also, if someone gets a copy of the file they can try to brute force the password at their leisure, whereas LastPass keeps it on their servers.

    Why not just put it in a text file and encrypt the whole disk instead?

    KeePass / Excel are portable and shareable as needed. And easy to back up still encrypted vs doing the whole disk.



  • Or if you use the consumer Webroot you already have access to LastPass just with webroot's name on it.



  • As a user of KeePass, I wrote a how-to on using KeePass with Dropbox or a like service a while back. It works great and is what I use.

    http://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/show/33119-how-to-create-a-synchronized-secure-password-database-with-keepass-professional-and-a-service-such-as-dropbox-box-google-drive-or-local-network-share



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Nic said:

    How good is the encryption? Also, if someone gets a copy of the file they can try to brute force the password at their leisure, whereas LastPass keeps it on their servers.

    Why not just put it in a text file and encrypt the whole disk instead?

    KeePass / Excel are portable and shareable as needed. And easy to back up still encrypted vs doing the whole disk.

    Not only portable but at least with KeePass you get the added bonus of having a password generated and built in encryption.



  • Yes. KeePass is super handy. And blind copy to clipboard too. I love that.


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