Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10



  • http://www.techworm.net/2017/01/forget-ubuntu-now-opensuse-linux-comes-windows-10.html

    Now your Linux experience on Windows 10 is bound to get a further refill with OpenSuse Linux distro. OpenSUSE has given the users an option to run openSUSE inside your Windows 10 installation. This way, you can run most openSUSE Apps within Windows 10 without having to install the Operating System separately like Ubuntu with Bash.



  • Is this real or like Ubuntu on Windows and just pretend?



  • @scottalanmiller IDK. How do you differentiate between pretend and real in this instance?



  • @scottalanmiller Looking at the OpenSUSE blog post they're using the same Windows Subsystem for Linux and replacing the Ubuntu userspace with SUSEs one.



  • I wondered if WSL was just containerizing Ubuntu. This blog post seems to confirm that. Now, if Client Hyper-V would just support GPU pass through my life would be complete.



  • Why would I want to do this? I see no point?



  • @aaronstuder said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    Why would I want to do this? I see no point?

    Why would you want to be able to run Linux commands/applications natively on Windows instead of having to resort to Cygwin? If you're in a situation where you can't run Linux as your desktop this is great. In general I think it is just a step in the right direction, but it is more of a step than they have made in a long time. I'm hopeful we'll see Office for Linux in the near future.



  • @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.



  • @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    Well, right now I can fire up bash on my Windows 10 computer and test commands and what not without having to access a VM (although I might actually be access one on some level...). It just gives me more flexibility in the short term. In the long term I hope this is the way forward for Windows. I'd love to see Microsoft port their UI to Linux and abandon their OS. I don't know if that will ever happen, but a guy can hope.



  • @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    exactly, it's one thing to have a bash shell, thereby having a native ssh shell to connect to 'nix boxes from/with, but installing applications locally on a desktop OS? seems weird.

    Those that run Linux on the desktop - do you really run at a terminal only? or are you using a GUI of sometime on 'nix? And when using 'apps' are they local terminal apps or are they more often than not GUI apps?
    If they are GUI apps, do you really want a 'nix GUI on your windows machine? You can have that through a VM.



  • @Kelly said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    Well, right now I can fire up bash on my Windows 10 computer and test commands and what not without having to access a VM (although I might actually be access one on some level...). It just gives me more flexibility in the short term. In the long term I hope this is the way forward for Windows. I'd love to see Microsoft port their UI to Linux and abandon their OS. I don't know if that will ever happen, but a guy can hope.

    Interesting, but then MS would also need to port all of their APIs over the 'nix too. Granted WINE has done a lot of them, perhaps enough of them to make most things work.



  • @Dashrender said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    exactly, it's one thing to have a bash shell, thereby having a native ssh shell to connect to 'nix boxes from/with, but installing applications locally on a desktop OS? seems weird.

    Those that run Linux on the desktop - do you really run at a terminal only? or are you using a GUI of sometime on 'nix? And when using 'apps' are they local terminal apps or are they more often than not GUI apps?
    If they are GUI apps, do you really want a 'nix GUI on your windows machine? You can have that through a VM.

    At work, I live in a bash shell for the most part. At home, I run Mint KDE.

    Also, yes, I've got a thing for KDE.



  • It's basically just the Linux shell. I just installed it last night but ran out of time to play with it. AFAIK, there's no GUI apps that work out of the box yet.

    As someone else mentioned, I see this being more of a server-level thing than a desktop os type thing for now.



  • @dafyre said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    It's basically just the Linux shell. I just installed it last night but ran out of time to play with it. AFAIK, there's no GUI apps that work out of the box yet.

    As someone else mentioned, I see this being more of a server-level thing than a desktop os type thing for now.

    Again, I totally see the desire to have a bash shell so you can remote into Linux boxes and control them, the ability to run bash scripts, etc.

    But local install of Linux apps on Windows - I don't really understand it.



  • @Dashrender said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @dafyre said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    It's basically just the Linux shell. I just installed it last night but ran out of time to play with it. AFAIK, there's no GUI apps that work out of the box yet.

    As someone else mentioned, I see this being more of a server-level thing than a desktop os type thing for now.

    Again, I totally see the desire to have a bash shell so you can remote into Linux boxes and control them, the ability to run bash scripts, etc.

    But local install of Linux apps on Windows - I don't really understand it.

    Yeah. A lt of people like to do it because they can, lol.



  • If I recall correctly - @scottalanmiller was unhappy because you can't control the windows box itself with the bash shell - to which I answer - of course not, there aren't bash commands for that, there are powershell commands for that.



  • @Dashrender said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    If I recall correctly - @scottalanmiller was unhappy because you can't control the windows box itself with the bash shell - to which I answer - of course not, there aren't bash commands for that, there are powershell commands for that.

    Which is totally wrong. There are no such things as "BASH commands", it's just a shell. BASH has been on Windows for decades and definitely controls everything. It's that the BASH here is NOT on Windows, it's in the Ubuntu VM so doesn't talk to Windows. I'm unhappy because they lied about it being on Windows, but it is not. BASH works on Windows just like PowerShell works on Linux. You are confusing commands with languages here.



  • @Dashrender said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @dafyre said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    It's basically just the Linux shell. I just installed it last night but ran out of time to play with it. AFAIK, there's no GUI apps that work out of the box yet.

    As someone else mentioned, I see this being more of a server-level thing than a desktop os type thing for now.

    Again, I totally see the desire to have a bash shell so you can remote into Linux boxes and control them, the ability to run bash scripts, etc.

    But local install of Linux apps on Windows - I don't really understand it.

    BASH has NOTHING to do with remote access. Now you are confusing the shell with the remote access method. PowerShell and BASH are the shells, PowerShell Remoting and SSH are remote access methods. Using BASH doesn't give you any means of remote control whatsoever.

    Linux apps on Windows are so that you can run things that you want in other environments.



  • @dafyre said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    It's basically just the Linux shell. I just installed it last night but ran out of time to play with it. AFAIK, there's no GUI apps that work out of the box yet.

    If it is anything like the Ubuntu install, there is no Linux whatsoever. None. It's pure Windows top to bottom. Just an Ubuntu environment running on Windows, but none of the Linux. Literally, none. It's an Ubuntu flavour of Windows in a VM, not Ubuntu the Linux distro running on top of Windows. That they called it Ubuntu at all is pure marketing.



  • @Dashrender said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    Well, right now I can fire up bash on my Windows 10 computer and test commands and what not without having to access a VM (although I might actually be access one on some level...). It just gives me more flexibility in the short term. In the long term I hope this is the way forward for Windows. I'd love to see Microsoft port their UI to Linux and abandon their OS. I don't know if that will ever happen, but a guy can hope.

    Interesting, but then MS would also need to port all of their APIs over the 'nix too. Granted WINE has done a lot of them, perhaps enough of them to make most things work.

    Not as hard as it sounds, they probably already have it. Almost all of their API goes to their shell, not their kernel. So porting is not nearly the challenge to the apps that you feel like it is. It's not trivial, but it isn't that big. Most OSes can be ported to other kernels, just like how "Ubuntu" was ported to Windows without the Linux kernel being there. That was pretty trivial.



  • @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @Kelly @aaronstuder In my head this is something I would expect to see more in a server environment, where a Linux application could be deployed on a Windows server in a more traditional "Role" than the overhead of deploying a full VM for the service.

    That's what we thought the goal was of their Ubuntu port, but it turns out that they went through a ton of effort to make sure that that would never happen. The old SFU system actually allowed for that. So in that regard, Windows is moving backwards.



  • @aidan_walsh said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller Looking at the OpenSUSE blog post they're using the same Windows Subsystem for Linux and replacing the Ubuntu userspace with SUSEs one.

    So it is all smoke and mirrors and totally pointless.



  • @Kelly said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    I wondered if WSL was just containerizing Ubuntu. This blog post seems to confirm that. Now, if Client Hyper-V would just support GPU pass through my life would be complete.

    Yes, containerized userspace, which is confusing, because Ubuntu refers to more than the userspace until they use it in this context - which is what makes it pure marketing. Ubuntu is a Linux distro, not just the userspace. Porting the userspace to Windows in a container is useless. We can't do anything useful with it, not really. It's an interesting college project I guess, but in the IT world, it's just a novelty for its own sake.



  • @aaronstuder said in Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10:

    Why would I want to do this? I see no point?

    There is none in the way that they did it. The way that they promote it, it would be awesome. But they approach that they took makes it a joke.


Log in to reply