The day AV died!





  • @technobabble I agree, the AV market is not a money maker. It's just going to move more and more to commodity.



  • That article had some really dated (and mostly residential) thinking. A modern AV solution (of which I can only think of 2 offhand) isn't bloated, and doesn't run on definitions. Free AV isn't available to businesses in most cases, so their statement of everybody being able to have free AV's really directed at the residential market. Most residential customers would rather not pay a recurring license charge for AV and instead pay more to generic residential tech firms in order to clean or wipe their computers.

    In the business world, it's still very much alive and kicking. Pricing's tighter, as it's more of a comodity now, but if a vendor can listen to the users and give them what they need with good detection and performance, there's some profit to be made.



  • I lost count of the PCs that small business have running some type of free av.



  • @technobabble said:

    I lost count of the PCs that small business have running some type of free av.

    Yeah. Nearly all, I'd say.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @technobabble said:

    I lost count of the PCs that small business have running some type of free av.

    Yeah. Nearly all, I'd say.

    And as a responsible MSP, we work to get them into licensing compliance.



  • MSE allows small businesses to run up to 10 licenses. Unless that's changed.



  • @Dashrender said:

    MSE allows small businesses to run up to 10 licenses. Unless that's changed.

    That's correct. Anything larger would be out of compliance.



  • @Dashrender said:

    MSE allows small businesses to run up to 10 licenses. Unless that's changed.

    Correct. We often recommend that for the under ten crowd. Just makes financial sense.



  • And now since Windows 8 includes it built in, a company could effectively get away without buying any AV for the end points. I personally liked MSE, but I know others who don't. Have always of you really need more than what comes with Win8 assuming you're running a decent firewall.



  • We haven't seen any issues with it.



  • @Dashrender said:

    And now since Windows 8 includes it built in, a company could effectively get away without buying any AV for the end points. I personally liked MSE, but I know others who don't. Have always of you really need more than what comes with Win8 assuming you're running a decent firewall.

    It's about taking the layered approach. Firewalls are old news; most of the modern attacks in the wild work from the inside out now, but it's still a good thing to have. If you have a UTM or other type of inline filtering setup, it's a good layer. Still, a good endpoint protection product is the last line of defense, and shouldn't be passed by.



  • I don't disagree Alex. But short of something like Webroots approach, the rest are pointless when you have MSE baked in.



  • @Dashrender said:

    I don't disagree Alex. But short of something like Webroots approach, the rest are pointless when you have MSE baked in.

    Exactly! There is a reason why I prefer Webroot. It functions well as an immune system for anything which manages to make it past the front door and onto the endpoint. Keep in mind that more and more users are moving to laptops, so there's a decent chance folks will be attached to non-company networks along the way, and need a solid onboard level of protection.



  • Yeah, we're trying to take a more holistic approach to security. Whether virus, malware or phishing, we're trying to be the one-stop place for security reputation for processes, IP address and URLs.


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