Hyper-V dynamic memory - reason not to use?



  • Are there some reasons or special cases where you would not want to use Hyper-V dynamic memory for a VM? I have a couple RDS servers that could see a huge surge in the RAM they use if users pile on, but if they do, they will use one server or the other, but not both. I think dynamic RAM would work well, but haven't enabled it before.



  • I've only heard that it's a bad idea to use on things like SQL Servers and such. I see no reason not to enable it for anything you expect to be constantly fine tuning the memory usage.

    I have it enabled on my VDI VMs here. I'd probably enable it on file servers, and IIS servers. Probably not on DCs though.

    Just my 2c worth.



  • The only thing I read is that it can only expand to 16 times what you start it at. If I understand correctly, if I want my server to be able to hit 80GB, I'll need to start it at 5GB.



  • @Mike-Davis said in Hyper-V dynamic memory - reason not to use?:

    The only thing I read is that it can only expand to 16 times what you start it at. If I understand correctly, if I want my server to be able to hit 80GB, I'll need to start it at 5GB.

    I haven't seen anything about that type of limit. Mostly because I won't ever have to worry about expanding a VM from 5 to 80GB, lol.

    Good info to have though!



  • ~50 VMs on two 2012 R2 hosts, incl. SharePoint, System Center, multiple SQL Servers, Exchange, lots of Linux and BSD - no issues.


  • Banned

    @dafyre said in Hyper-V dynamic memory - reason not to use?:

    I've only heard that it's a bad idea to use on things like SQL Servers and such. I see no reason not to enable it for anything you expect to be constantly fine tuning the memory usage.

    I have it enabled on my VDI VMs here. I'd probably enable it on file servers, and IIS servers. Probably not on DCs though.

    Just my 2c worth.

    SQL will eat up as much as you give it so it's a bad idea.


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