Windows 7 versus Windows 8.1 Update 1



  • Not sure if this has been discussed already, but what's the ML verdict? Are corporates starting to choose 8.1 over 7 for new desktops now MS has ironed out a few niggles?

    I completely avoided Vista, as HP machines came with XP downgrade rights until 7 came out. So we went from XP to 7. We could miss out on 8.1 as well I guess, and go from 7 to 9, since HP machines come with 7 downgrade rights. But would I be missing out? My users would appreciate the fast boot time of 8.1, especially the road warriors with laptops, but I'm not sure if there are any other advantages? Is 8.1 faster and more stable?

    What are you all doing? Is there now any good reason to stick with 7 on new machines?

    Also, any good group policy tips specific for 8.1?



  • NTG went 7 -> 8 -> 8.1. The 8 and later are annoying but 9 will before if the same. I'm starting to prefer 8.1 to 7. It's screaming fast, boots instantly and rock solid. The interface is pointless but you get used to it and you have to get used to it sooner or later or leave Windows completely. So... Better to jump in or leave than to linger on a platform you no longer want to use.



  • This article is from the 8.0 era but talks about the decision making process.

    http://smbitjournal.com/2013/03/is-it-time-to-move-to-windows-8/



  • Windows 8.1 is really surprisingly fast and light on resources. And well supported now.



  • I run 8.1 on a six or seven year old desktop and it feels almost like new. The almost negligible boot time isn't to be scoffed at. I can turn my machine off but have it up to the desktop in seconds whenever I need.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I run 8.1 on a six or seven year old desktop and it feels almost like new. The almost negligible boot time isn't to be scoffed at. I can turn my machine off but have it up to the desktop in seconds whenever I need.
    The built in hibernate/sleep thing that is fast boot does work really well. I have turned it off on my desktop sine installing the SSD and find that it is still quite fast. I will probably turn it back on as I have no real reason to have it turned off. Just was wanting to compare performance.



  • The issue I have with 8.x is that it's simply so different and not intuitive enough within reason. But like anything, you get used to it i.e Marriage 😉

    I do like the search option and how you can create your own tiles how you wish.

    What I do not like for instance is that there are two IE programs, and they are very different!

    I think a lot of businesses will stay with Windows 7 for a long time, mainly due to training and also, hardware compatibility (but never found an issue myself so far)



  • I actually find the search in Win 8 to be its downfall. Doesn't work as well as in 7.



  • I think Windows 8.1 is amazing. Everything is organized much better once you get used to it.

    I do dislike the Metro IE Browser, but I also see its benefits in the future. We support online banking for our credit union members and it would be awesome to have a Windows 8 app that used the Metro IE settings. There would be no more user error for IE settings which our 95% of the calls our Member Service Call Center receives. Also, web based apps we use today could be launched from the Metro IE interface with all their settings baked in.



  • My GPOs (at least I think it's the GPOs) are causing my boot time to be 1-2 mins... this is something i need to see if I can fix.



  • How many GPOs are processing on average for each Windows 8 PC? Do you use WMI Filtering?



  • I have it on old hardware and am constantly amazed how well it performs.

    I have my small businesses using W8.1.1 and they love it. I however take the time to remove 90% of the icons off the Start Screen. I also tick the box that allows the desktop and Start Screen background look the same. I pin the users most used programs to the Task Bar and the Start Screen. Oh and I install PDF from Foxit and change the default PDF, music, and video from Metro Apps.

    At last look none of my users want to have Windows automatically go to the Desktop, which is WEIRD since NONE of them are using the Metro Apps.



  • @IRJ said:

    How many GPOs are processing on average for each Windows 8 PC? Do you use WMI Filtering?

    two - one for users and one for machines. I use WMI filtering only for printer deployment.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    How many GPOs are processing on average for each Windows 8 PC? Do you use WMI Filtering?

    two - one for users and one for machines. I use WMI filtering only for printer deployment.

    I might take flack for this, but I found it easier to use multiple GPOs and name them by function. I also break my PCs into different OUs by branch or department. I find its more effecient this way because if you know a group of PCs in an OU doesnt need a GPO, it wont even look to process it.



  • This post covered it a little while ago:
    http://www.mangolassi.it/topic/741/need-help-with-ou-s#12186 - that seems to be a decent structure



  • @IRJ said:

    @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    How many GPOs are processing on average for each Windows 8 PC? Do you use WMI Filtering?

    two - one for users and one for machines. I use WMI filtering only for printer deployment.

    I might take flack for this, but I found it easier to use multiple GPOs and name them by function. I also break my PCs into different OUs by branch or department. I find its more effecient this way because if you know a group of PCs in an OU doesnt need a GPO, it wont even look to process it.

    Yeah - but all of my computers need the GPO - at least the base one. I can't really create different GPOs for the printers because the WMI lookup is based on IP, and if appropriate it will map a printer for that location.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    @Dashrender said:

    @IRJ said:

    How many GPOs are processing on average for each Windows 8 PC? Do you use WMI Filtering?

    two - one for users and one for machines. I use WMI filtering only for printer deployment.

    I might take flack for this, but I found it easier to use multiple GPOs and name them by function. I also break my PCs into different OUs by branch or department. I find its more effecient this way because if you know a group of PCs in an OU doesnt need a GPO, it wont even look to process it.

    Yeah - but all of my computers need the GPO - at least the base one. I can't really create different GPOs for the printers because the WMI lookup is based on IP, and if appropriate it will map a printer for that location.

    Why not just skip WMI all together and Deploy Printers in multiple GPOs (one for each location)?



  • You obviously need to sort your OUs by location first, but that will reduce processing time tremendously



  • I can't create GPOs based on location because the users move the laptops between locations. The machine goes where the user goes.



  • We are about to subject a non-tech user to their first time seeing Windows since Windows 2000 and it will be 8.1. This will be exciting.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    We are about to subject a non-tech user to their first time seeing Windows since Windows 2000 and it will be 8.1. This will be exciting.

    You sir, have an interesting view of excitement!! 😉


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