SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal



  • @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    Not possible in a few years right now, but closer to a century. If things break, that's what you have robots for. And once we have the capability to actually send robotic mining crew to a different planet, I think we would be capable of building them to last a few decades.

    You have all the power available already, from nearby star.



  • @coliver said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    The hand waving here. Just start blowing chunks off the planet and using ion engines to push it toward the home planet (or wherever you are doing processing) it could take millions of years but if you start closer you could have a constant stream of these coming in.

    The scale of an Ion cannon capable of blowing away usable chunks of a planet is an even greater challenge. It would be far easier to send down massive mining systems to each planet and have the resources funneled to the mining ships.



  • @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    Not possible in a few years right now, but closer to a century. If things break, that's what you have robots for. And once we have the capability to actually send robotic mining crew to a different planet, I think we would be capable of building them to last a few decades.

    You have all the power available already, from nearby star.

    Solar power is great, but this only goes so far, you have storms/clouds etc on planets. All of which effect solar power. If we're talking CrapWars death-planet thing, this is completely unreasonable, as discussed.



  • @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @coliver said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    The hand waving here. Just start blowing chunks off the planet and using ion engines to push it toward the home planet (or wherever you are doing processing) it could take millions of years but if you start closer you could have a constant stream of these coming in.

    The scale of an Ion cannon capable of blowing away usable chunks of a planet is an even greater challenge. It would be far easier to send down massive mining systems to each planet and have the resources funneled to the mining ships.

    You wouldn't use an ion cannon for that. You would use a rail cannon or something kinetic.



  • @coliver said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @coliver said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    The hand waving here. Just start blowing chunks off the planet and using ion engines to push it toward the home planet (or wherever you are doing processing) it could take millions of years but if you start closer you could have a constant stream of these coming in.

    The scale of an Ion cannon capable of blowing away usable chunks of a planet is an even greater challenge. It would be far easier to send down massive mining systems to each planet and have the resources funneled to the mining ships.

    You wouldn't use an ion cannon for that. You would use a rail cannon or something kinetic.

    Again this is completely impractical to start. The size of it would have to be as big as the planet to do the job efficiently. Which would take an entire planet to just make.



  • @scottalanmiller said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @coliver said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    I really wish they had just made the Thrawn trilogy into movies instead of making A New Hope 2.0.

    Exactly. I don't even consider the new one to BE Star Wars. It's Disney Wars.

    I know why you say that, but I'm not sure I agree. Disney of course has their name all over things, but Lucas Film is still mostly allowed to run itself.



  • Look at this from our point of view.

    Human started digging with our hands, and then basic tools, to dynamite, to heavy machinery.

    The next scale up would be earth movies like what Caterpillar makes (these things are huge, 5 stories tall etc) this is real world uses.

    And it will still take us hundreds of years to just clear out the worlds largest copper mine in Mexico.

    Only with going to bigger and faster more reliable equipment would it be feasible to do this. Ion Cannons or Rail Guns etc are all completely impractical to begin this with, by a sheer amount of resources needed to make it useful.

    They'd be better off planting a bomb big enough in the planet to crack the planet into pieces. At least this is practical in a sense that it could be done.

    Harvest reactive material on a massive scale (use modest mining technology) and plant the bomb(s) and have them timed to go off at the exact same time.



  • @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @DustinB3403 said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    @marcinozga said in SETI Investigating Deep Space Signal:

    Not exactly. All you have to do is to jump-start the whole process by sending robots and mining equipment to a small planet. Getting raw materials to orbit would be relatively easy, because of lower gravity force, and initial harvested energy would be delivered to mining equipment on the planet, greatly increasing output over time, as more and more energy collectors orbit the sun. Once you're done with one planet, move to another. Rinse and repeat.

    The harvesting of the raw materials is easy in comparison, but you still need power to do it (an unbelievable amount of power). You can't be spending centuries chewing through a planet.

    It would have to be done in a scale of a few years (worst case). Longer than that and you get into the "fix it stage" where your equipment is breaking down so often that you can't possibly replace it fast enough to keep a forward going pace.

    Not possible in a few years right now, but closer to a century. If things break, that's what you have robots for. And once we have the capability to actually send robotic mining crew to a different planet, I think we would be capable of building them to last a few decades.

    You have all the power available already, from nearby star.

    Solar power is great, but this only goes so far, you have storms/clouds etc on planets. All of which effect solar power. If we're talking CrapWars death-planet thing, this is completely unreasonable, as discussed.

    Planet like Mercury hardly has any atmosphere so solar power is perfectly applicable there. Venus would be more challenging, but we can always convert solar into microwave and beam it to the station on surface. Sulphuric acid in atmosphere poses bigger problem than supplying energy there.

    Originally we were talking about Kardaschew Type II civilization, which could potentially build Dyson sphere (rather impossible), but more realistically would build Dyson swarm, and that's something even humans could build in about a century.