Grub Issue Already discussed things



  • I have already discussed that i am unable to install the Linux OS in my laptop because of Grub error.
    One of our forum members said to try boot repair cd and i have tried with that CD also,but unable to install the OS.
    Whether can I delete the C drive only and then try to install the linux on that?

    Some told to delete the hard disk fully and install the OS after deleting the partitions in the harddisk.
    I can't do that since many valuable data are present in it.
    Any ideas



  • You are trying to install Linux onto a disk that is full of critical data? That seems like a bad idea.

    Linux is not generic, what OS specifically are you trying to install?



  • You can't install something if you don't free up space to install it on. Without removing a partition, or making one smaller, both of which carry risks of loosing the data. Backup, backup, and backup before attempting anything like this.

    You could have easily installed Linux using Virtualbox without having to mess with partitions and/or messing up the boot sector.



  • @scottalanmiller I am trying to install Tails or Ubuntu OS in my laptop



  • @Lakshmana said:

    @scottalanmiller I am trying to install Tails or Ubuntu OS in my laptop

    Why not in a VM on VirtualBox? What's causing the need to dual boot?



  • My laptop is having Windows 8 with 2GB DDR3 RAM only.
    If I use Linux OS,I can have some RAM space in linux OS in that I can use VMware



  • @Lakshmana said:

    My laptop is having Windows 8 with 2GB DDR3 RAM only.

    Oh, that would be a major issue. I have 4GB and I need all of it just for my web browsers!



  • @Lakshmana said:

    If I use Linux OS,I can have some RAM space in linux OS in that I can use VMware

    I don't understand this bit. Where did VMware come from?



  • @scottalanmiller If i install Linux OS means I will use the Wine to install the VMware or any virtual products where the usage of the RAM will be done efficiently as per my requirement



  • @Lakshmana said:

    @scottalanmiller If i install Linux OS means I will use the Wine to install the VMware or any virtual products where the usage of the RAM will be done efficiently as per my requirement

    No, that's not what that means.

    Linux can use Wine to run some Windows applications, that is true. Linux is better at memory management than Windows, that is true. But VMware ESXi does not run on Windows and none of this makes sense if you were going to do virtualization.

    If you want VMware ESXi, then you have to install Vmware ESXi, you can't install Linux first.

    We need to back up and figure out what your goal is, I fear that you are doing a project just to find out you did the wrong project.



  • @Lakshmana said:

    @scottalanmiller If i install Linux OS means I will use the Wine to install the VMware or any virtual products where the usage of the RAM will be done efficiently as per my requirement

    We're obviously missing lots and lots of information here. Let me list what I think I know so far, and then what you are wanting to do.

    You have tried to install Ubuntu. The laptop no longer boots. You want to install Ubuntu without loosing data. The laptop has a small amount of memory available. You obviously don't understand Wine/VMware/Virtualbox. Finally, you have at least created a scenario that you're laptop no longer boots, and we don't know weather that "very important data" is really around or not.

    Does that cover the situation you are in?

    Let's start out at a Spiceworks University Virtualization 101

    Installing Ubuntu and running from it is not going to make using less memory for the same tasks you currently do possible.

    If you want the laptop working, you may be able to boot from the recovery media that you made for the laptop, and choose "Repair a current windows installation" in the 2nd screen.

    You probably want to pay attention to an industry best-practice. The rule states "If the data is not backed up, then it is not important."

    What is your goal here? IE "usage of the RAM will be done efficiently as per my requirement" doesn't make sense to most of us. Yes, Ubuntu can use less RAM than Windows, but the applications you run will still have the same resource needs.



  • @travisdh1 said:

    What is your goal here? IE "usage of the RAM will be done efficiently as per my requirement" doesn't make sense to most of us. Yes, Ubuntu can use less RAM than Windows, but the applications you run will still have the same resource needs.

    And running Windows on top of "Vmware" on top of Linux is not going to use fewer resources, it will use more.



  • Running Linux as base OS and using VMware in it will somewhat reduce the space to test two or three OS in it



  • @Lakshmana said:

    Running Linux as base OS and using VMware in it will somewhat reduce the space to test two or three OS in it

    Don't use VMware as a term for a product, that is confusing everyone. VMware is a company that makes many products. None of which is called VMware. It would be like calling something Microsoft. It could mean a lot of things. What VMware product are you picturing using?

    In what way do you picture running Linux reducing space? And if you want to run Linux to run VMs, why are you dual booting?


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