Root Android Device



  • How to root Android Device?
    I have tried many apps from play stores such z4,iroot and other things
    I have also tried the software in the system with the windows machine to root my phone but
    it was not possible.
    My phone is Samsung SM-G313H.Any ideas to root my phone.
    I need to install Ubuntu OS in it.



  • @Lakshmana said:

    I need to install Ubuntu OS in it.

    Why would you bother rooting your phone and then install Ubuntu on it? Just install Ubuntu first and then there is no reason to have rooted it.



  • Why do you want Ubuntu on your phone? What is your end goal? Have you looked to see if Ubuntu will even support that phone?



  • @scottalanmiller Yes I have checked.It gives an information that i need to have root privilges.
    I need to test my phone with ubuntu or any linux os.



  • Android is a Linux OS.

    Where did you check? I don't understand how having root to one OS is a factor in installing another. When you say things like "it says", please provide a link to the source because we will ask every time. It will save a round of posting if you produce the links when you know that they will be necessary.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    when you know that they will be necessary.

    Ok Android is a Linux OS.
    I need to test the phone whether the Ubuntu OS fits in it by deleting Android OS.
    I am not asking you the links I am already tried with the things,so idea?/



  • @Lakshmana said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    when you know that they will be necessary.

    Ok Android is a Linux OS.
    I need to test the phone whether the Ubuntu OS fits in it by deleting Android OS.
    I am not asking you the links I am already tried with the things,so idea?/

    I know you are not asking, but you need to help us help you get to your goal rather than getting lost on things that may or may not have anything to do with it. You are talking about rooting an Android device in order to replace Android to get Ubuntu because you want Linux which you already have. You said you want to test if Ubuntu will work but state that you are sure that it will because of links you won't provide. So you are acting like you have trusted sources so trusted you won't share them with us to have us verify them, yet this experiment is for the purpose of verifying them because you don't trust them?

    Your explanation is not consistent. In order to get help, provide the information requested. It is important for us to understand what you are attempting to do in order to help. Especially since none of us are likely to have that phone, far fewer would root a phone and far, far fewer would install Ubuntu on a phone.



  • @scottalanmiller
    Phone Having : Samsung SM-G313H
    Installed OS : Android Kitkat
    Need to Install : Ubuntu or Other Linux OS as Primary
    APK Files Tried : iRoot,Towel root,Z4root
    Exe Files Tried : King root,
    RAM used :512 MB

    Tried APK for OS Installation: Linux Deploy,GNU Root

    Busybox is being asked When I tried Framaroot in my APK file format.But not able to root my device.



  • I'm having problems finding a good site with an example of what to do.



  • Are you trying to install Ubuntu regular for ARM, or Ubuntu Phone?



  • Are you sure that you found a site with this information and that it is correct? I'm sorry to keep asking, but there appears to be confusion and clearing it up would help speed this along greatly.



  • Most Android phones are carrier locked (at least in the US) so you can't just install Ubuntu unless you root the phone so you can unlock the phone, which then allows you to flash a new OS on the device.



  • I think he found one of the apps that will install Ubuntu along with Android. I don't understand the purpose, but they want root access for it to run. Just a guess.



  • @johnhooks said:

    I think he found one of the apps that will install Ubuntu along with Android. I don't understand the purpose, but they want root access for it to run. Just a guess.

    That would make sense. But he stated that he wanted to delete Android, not keep it.



  • @Dashrender said:

    Most Android phones are carrier locked (at least in the US) so you can't just install Ubuntu unless you root the phone so you can unlock the phone, which then allows you to flash a new OS on the device.

    That should have been stated when asked, then.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Most Android phones are carrier locked (at least in the US) so you can't just install Ubuntu unless you root the phone so you can unlock the phone, which then allows you to flash a new OS on the device.

    That should have been stated when asked, then.

    I find that statement almost laughable. I consider that knowledge kinda a given for anyone who is working on rooting/replacing as OS on an Android device.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Most Android phones are carrier locked (at least in the US) so you can't just install Ubuntu unless you root the phone so you can unlock the phone, which then allows you to flash a new OS on the device.

    That should have been stated when asked, then.

    I find that statement almost laughable. I consider that knowledge kinda a given for anyone who is working on rooting/replacing as OS on an Android device.

    Which aspect?

    Remember that replacing the OS and rooting are unrelated. If you have to unlock a locked device via a rooting process, that's different. At a high level, this is unrelated. Many Android devices do not require this, but many people confuse rooting and installing and that means that clarity around intention is critical.



  • Really? Many Android devices don't require rooting to replace the OS? I guess my limited exposure to US devices has biased me.



  • @Dashrender said:

    Really? Many Android devices don't require rooting to replace the OS? I guess my limited exposure to US devices has biased me.

    Many do, of course, but many do not. Most of the world does not use locked devices. In many places they are not even legal. Remember that most of the world does not have phones from their carriers, so carrier locking is pretty rare. Therefore there really isn't any drive to lock the OS either.

    Don't know how often it happens, but quite often it does not.



  • I need to root my device first after that only i can install the OS in my device.
    I have verified the details



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Many do, of course, but many do not. Most of the world does not use locked devices.

    You are talking about two distinct things.

    Rooting a phone is required to replace the OS.

    Carrier locking of phones has little tondo with rooting other than people rooting phones to get around carrier locks.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Many do, of course, but many do not. Most of the world does not use locked devices.

    You are talking about two distinct things.

    Rooting a phone is required to replace the OS.

    Carrier locking of phones has little tondo with rooting other than people rooting phones to get around carrier locks.

    Yeah I thought I was over complicating it.
    thanks 😉



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Many do, of course, but many do not. Most of the world does not use locked devices.

    You are talking about two distinct things.

    Rooting a phone is required to replace the OS.

    Carrier locking of phones has little tondo with rooting other than people rooting phones to get around carrier locks.

    There aren't any phones that allow you to flash them externally without needing to have root access to the existing OS first? I thought that a lot of phone makers were offering that feature. Not something I look for, I could be totally wrong.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @JaredBusch said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Many do, of course, but many do not. Most of the world does not use locked devices.

    You are talking about two distinct things.

    Rooting a phone is required to replace the OS.

    Carrier locking of phones has little tondo with rooting other than people rooting phones to get around carrier locks.

    There aren't any phones that allow you to flash them externally without needing to have root access to the existing OS first? I thought that a lot of phone makers were offering that feature. Not something I look for, I could be totally wrong.

    I don't think so. In order to flash, you have to have root. Having root on the phone allows malware to do even worse things if it's unchecked.



  • @Dashrender said:

    I don't think so. In order to flash, you have to have root. Having root on the phone allows malware to do even worse things if it's unchecked.

    Of course, but similar devices (not phones just all sorts of devices) you normally can flash externally. What happens if the phone gets damaged and the OS does not work (e.g. there is no root), what do you do? On my iPhone I can flash it without being rooted (and I have and my dad did this week too.)



  • @Dashrender said:

    I don't think so. In order to flash, you have to have root. Having root on the phone allows malware to do even worse things if it's unchecked.

    You don't 'have root' on the phone. All phone have the ability to be booted with root access. Using root to remove or change that bad does not imply giving root access to applications once rebooted normally.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    I don't think so. In order to flash, you have to have root. Having root on the phone allows malware to do even worse things if it's unchecked.

    Of course, but similar devices (not phones just all sorts of devices) you normally can flash externally. What happens if the phone gets damaged and the OS does not work (e.g. there is no root), what do you do? On my iPhone I can flash it without being rooted (and I have and my dad did this week too.)

    Rooting a phone is specifically an android term. The matching term for iOS is jail breaking



  • @JaredBusch said:

    Rooting a phone is specifically an android term. The matching term for iOS is jail breaking

    Yes, I know that they call it jailbreaking. Rooting is not an Android term, though, it's been an industry standard term for getting root level access when you were not supposed to have it (or a device tried to keep you from it) for a very long time, definitely back to my college years in the early 1990s. It simply means getting root level access (even for systems where that is not called root.)



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @Dashrender said:

    I don't think so. In order to flash, you have to have root. Having root on the phone allows malware to do even worse things if it's unchecked.

    You don't 'have root' on the phone. All phone have the ability to be booted with root access. Using root to remove or change that bad does not imply giving root access to applications once rebooted normally.

    Understood, but if he installs his own OS to the device by flashing it, he can bypass needing root access to the system he is blowing away. The new system will be Ubuntu so root should be available to him, if not he can worry about rooting that. My question is... is there no way to flash physically and only from inside of the existing OS?



  • Some phones have a special recovery mode... that recovery mode (that allows you to reflash your phone if it is bricked, like an iPhone) will check signatures on the updates that you are trying to install. If the signatures don't match, then it won't install.

    In the Android world, the first thing you do is generally root the phone, then the next step is to install a custom boot loader that doesn't enforce the signature checking.


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