Not a Review, but a cool product



  • Check this out

    Nice lil small PC. has a real hard disk, win 8.1 4 gigs of ram, and a dual core processor for $219 if you want to mess with the rebate, 239 if not.



  • Neat. I wish that it had a better processor, though.



  • Nice.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Neat. I wish that it had a better processor, though.

    Compared to what you are running today?



  • 1.5 GHz Celeron isn't really a beefy processor. This would be limited to just basic office tasks... I wonder what the full use case for this would be?



  • Nevermind.. I thought it had an i3 processor.
    Amazon's layout with 'other reviewed products' at the top drew my eye to the specs of an i3 - making me think this was an i3...

    Yeah I'd pass on this too.



  • An i3 would make it rather nice.



  • 4GB of RAM isn't too bad but it would be nice to see more memory as well. An i3 or better with 8GB would be really nice.



  • I didn't realize the Celeron was still around.. I thought maybe they finally gave up on it.



  • @thecreativeone91 said:

    I didn't realize the Celeron was still around.. I thought maybe they finally gave up on it.

    How did you miss that? It never went away. It is in nearly everything these days.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thecreativeone91 said:

    I didn't realize the Celeron was still around.. I thought maybe they finally gave up on it.

    How did you miss that? It never went away. It is in nearly everything these days.

    Wishful thinking... I think they are still selling Pentium Ds as well.



  • @coliver said:

    Wishful thinking... I think they are still selling Pentium Ds as well.

    That's a bit different though. The Pentium D is a specific model and they sell old ones for embedded systems and specialty hardware. It's still an ancient processor and has not changed in over a decade.

    The Celeron is a line that has existed since shortly after the introduction of the Pentium Pro. It is a line, not a model. Very different. The Celeron is a current processor, under current development and new models come out all of the time.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thecreativeone91 said:

    I didn't realize the Celeron was still around.. I thought maybe they finally gave up on it.

    How did you miss that? It never went away. It is in nearly everything these days.

    I don't really keep up with consumer grade stuff anymore.. anything I deal with usually is a Core i5/Core i7 when at the business grade machines.



  • @coliver said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @thecreativeone91 said:

    I didn't realize the Celeron was still around.. I thought maybe they finally gave up on it.

    How did you miss that? It never went away. It is in nearly everything these days.

    Wishful thinking... I think they are still selling Pentium Ds as well.

    It has a good purpose though the Core iSeries doesn't work to well in Fanless Industrial units (I used to design some). but they can still be more powerful than Atom Chips. Also when working under CostGuard/Military contracts they require the use of the same hardware for the duration of the contract.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @coliver said:

    Wishful thinking... I think they are still selling Pentium Ds as well.

    That's a bit different though. The Pentium D is a specific model and they sell old ones for embedded systems and specialty hardware. It's still an ancient processor and has not changed in over a decade.

    The Celeron is a line that has existed since shortly after the introduction of the Pentium Pro. It is a line, not a model. Very different. The Celeron is a current processor, under current development and new models come out all of the time.

    That's good to know. I though the Pentium D was a line that was being marketed to the extremely low end. That it was being marketed as a replacement chip which is still being manufactured after a decade is mind boggling.



  • They still make the 486 too.



  • @scottalanmiller Wow... that processor family is as old as I am.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    They still make the 486 too.

    Why on earth would they possibly make that still?



  • Guys, for 219 what do you think you're going to get? Bunch of champagne on a beer budget folk in here! This would make a great kitchen PC, or a TV media center. Or I intend to use it to run my DVR software for my home security system. g-zam



  • @Hubtech said:

    Guys, for 219 what do you think you're going to get? Bunch of champagne on a beer budget folk in here! This would make a great kitchen PC, or a TV media center. Or I intend to use it to run my DVR software for my home security system. g-zam

    you can buy intel NUCs and similar for around $250 with core i3s and i5s.



  • Do they come with OS ram and hd?



  • @ajstringham said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    They still make the 486 too.

    Why on earth would they possibly make that still?

    Embedded devices. They cost pennies to buy and if all that you need is a 486, why pay for anything more? The 486 is actually much more powerful than the 8bit Z80 that tons of devices still use. What do you think powers washing machines, microwaves, refrigerators, watches, etc.? There are microprocessors all around you in nearly everything that you deal with every day. Only a small fraction of those are modern AMD64 processors, those are super expensive and overpowered for most tasks.

    What do you think powers an Arduino?



  • The Motorola M68000 processor family is still popular in embedded devices too. That was already an old processor when it was put in the Apple Mac in 1984.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @ajstringham said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    They still make the 486 too.

    Why on earth would they possibly make that still?

    Embedded devices. They cost pennies to buy and if all that you need is a 486, why pay for anything more? The 486 is actually much more powerful than the 8bit Z80 that tons of devices still use. What do you think powers washing machines, microwaves, refrigerators, watches, etc.? There are microprocessors all around you in nearly everything that you deal with every day. Only a small fraction of those are modern AMD64 processors, those are super expensive and overpowered for most tasks.

    What do you think powers an Arduino?

    Makes sense.



  • I find the 486 pretty boring. But I would love to have some small computers (with console serial outputs or ethernet in some cases) made from some old systems like the Zilog Z80 and Motorola M68K derivatives or other less common procs. They would be a lot of fun to use as true, hardware-based retro gaming platforms. Just for fun, not practical at all. But interesting.


Log in to reply