• RE: 4th Ammendment

    @Dashrender said in 4th Ammendment:

    @StorageNinja said in 4th Ammendment:

    @scottalanmiller said in 4th Ammendment:

    "The Supreme Court has clearly and repeatedly confirmed that the border search exception applies within 100 miles of the border of the United States as seen in cases such as United States v. Martinez-Fuerte where it was held that the Border Patrol's routine stopping of a vehicle at a permanent checkpoint located on a major highway away from the Mexican border for brief questioning of the vehicle's occupants is consistent with the Fourth Amendment."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Martinez-Fuerte

    I assume this is like the 4th amendment really doesn't apply much to game wardens for the purpose of looking in your freezer etc. Doesn't it only work for the purposes though of border enforcement, and only by border patrol?

    Very likely - but meh, the cops will simply call in border patrol to do the searching, etc.

    Couple things here..

    that case involved a fixed internal checkpoint on a highway (Not my house, or an arbitrary checkpoint setup on my local street).

    The court felt that any intrusion to motorists was a minimal one and that the government and public interest outweighed the constitutional rights of the individual - I don't see how searching my house is ever going to fall under this.

    The court also ruled that the stops were Constitutional even if largely based on apparent Mexican ancestry - The courts cool with casual racial based policing when near a border.

    one's expectation of privacy in an automobile and of freedom in its operation are significantly different from the traditional expectation of privacy and freedom in one's residence. United States v. Ortiz, 422 U.S. at 422 U. S. 896 n. 2; see Cardwell v. Lewis, 417 U. S. 583, 417 U. S. 590-591 (1974) Basically, again if it's in a car your expectations are a lot lower.

    we hold that the stops and questioning at issue may be made in the absence of any individualized suspicion at reasonably located checkpoints - The checkpoint has be reasonable. I-35 North coming out of Larando? reasonable. I-35 north of San Antonio? yahhhh unlikely.

    This isn't 100% removal of the 4th amendment within 100 miles of the border.
    It IS still a questionable ruling.

    posted in Water Closet
  • RE: 4th Ammendment

    @scottalanmiller said in 4th Ammendment:

    "The Supreme Court has clearly and repeatedly confirmed that the border search exception applies within 100 miles of the border of the United States as seen in cases such as United States v. Martinez-Fuerte where it was held that the Border Patrol's routine stopping of a vehicle at a permanent checkpoint located on a major highway away from the Mexican border for brief questioning of the vehicle's occupants is consistent with the Fourth Amendment."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Martinez-Fuerte

    I assume this is like the 4th amendment really doesn't apply much to game wardens for the purpose of looking in your freezer etc. Doesn't it only work for the purposes though of border enforcement, and only by border patrol?

    posted in Water Closet
  • RE: Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice

    @scottalanmiller said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    I don't believe this. Maybe 50%. I'm used as a reference for a lot of people, and almost never get calls. People ask for references way more than they call them. And even if they call them, they have to also then turn someone down based on the responses. If the response is "we had to fire them for legal reasons", sure. But if it is "they didn't give ENOUGH notice on a contract we won't show you", what buffoon is going to not hire you for that? No one with a functional company, that's for sure.
    And that's still assuming that you can't get a single good reference. No one needs twenty of them, no one checks every job. It is SO easy to get good references, there is no real fear in getting stuck with a bad one.

    I was a manager for 8 employees and with churn had another 4-5 that would list me as a reference. I got calls on maybe 2 people ever. (Magnus and BizDPS). I prefer to leave a LinkedIn reference (A public one) when someone asks about it so they can point to that as an initial starting point. The biggest reference that matter is internal ones to the company you are going to (Like that one time I gave a reference at 3AM for John White lol). HR and managers trust people who know the companies expectations and culture.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    Very few positions are allowed to legally enforce a "exit announcement" at all, much less with any length of time attached to it.

    Medicine is one. For Doctors, states can require as much as 30 day notice.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: Simple Resume Fails

    @scottalanmiller said in Simple Resume Fails:

    Working FOR a religious organization is totally different than announcing an affiliation. I've worked for religious groups to which I was in no way affiliated, for example.

    Also as an example, many hospitals in the US might have in theory religious affiliations (Catholic, Methodist, Lutheran) but outside of SPECIFIC clergy roles, they can't discriminate in who they hire. No one in their right mind is going to assume the IT guy at Methodist is a Methodist.

    Putting that you have kids is a resume is a more odd one that I'm kinda neutral to. While a hiring manager can't ASK that question if volunteered it could be a purposeful signal that he likely doesn't want to consider roles that are 300 days of travel (and be saving a lot of people time).

    Non-profit volunteer information might be valuable to companies who encourage that sort of thing (I get 40 hours of "volunteer time, in addition to our vacation policy" as an example). For companies that have policies encouraging community involvement, this might be important.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: MangoCon 2019

    @JaredBusch said in MangoCon 2019:

    $281 for Basic Economy from ORD to DFW (United/American)
    $282 from MDW to DAL (Southwest)

    You don't want Basic Economy. TRUST ME.

    posted in MangoCon
  • Your Boss NEEDS To Read This WSJ Article About Our Power Grid And How The Russians Hacked It With Phishing

    alt text

    In a Jan 10, 2019 article, the Wall Street Journal reconstructed the worst known hack into the USA's power grid revealing attacks on hundreds of small contractors.

    The title is very apt: "America’s Electric Grid Has a Vulnerable Back Door—and Russia Walked Through It".

    It's so relevant because it describes a very effective supply-chain attack that could happen to your own organization as well. The article focuses on the spear phishing and watering hole attacks that compromised small contractors and giving the attackers a footprint to hack further up the power grid chain. Remember the Target hack?

    The Wall Street Journal pieced together this account of how the attack unfolded through documents, computer records and interviews with people at the affected companies, current and former government officials and security-industry investigators. Some experts believe two dozen or more utilities ultimately were breached.

    It's a must-read because this is the No.1 vulnerability that leads to the dreaded data breach. If I were you I would sit down with your management team do the following exercise:

    • Identify the top 5 suppliers that would cause downtime or serious disruption of your production if they would get hacked or were off the air

    • Find out if they only require once-a-year awareness training just to be compliant

    • To keep their business as your supplier, require them to sign up with KnowBe4, and deliver you the evidence that their users have stepped through the 45-minute module and get sent simulated phishing attacks once a month. As you see, I'm dead serious here.

    This excellent WSJ reporting demonstrates again that your own employees need to be the strongest human firewall possible, and that your suppliers also need to be part of that same defense-in-depth strategy.

    Here is the link to that article one more time, so you can cut & paste it. This may be the most important article related to InfoSec your C-levels read this year. Make sure they do:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/americas-electric-grid-has-a-vulnerable-back-doorand-russia-walked-through-it-11547137112

    Let's stay safe out there.

    Warm regards,

    Stu Sjouwerman

    Founder and CEO, KnowBe4, Inc

    alt text

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: Why I Feel KVM Is the Easiest HyperVisor to Learn the Basics On

    @Dashrender said in Why I Feel KVM Is the Easiest HyperVisor to Learn the Basics On:

    The question is - why is the quality so bad? Isn't the process supposed to catch bad quality?

    Their process is consider the windows insider group (extreme power users) to be a good enough replacement for proper QE teams, and writing automated build tests.

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: VMWare Shutdown

    @wrx7m said in VMWare Shutdown:

    For vmware, if you are going to shutdown only (no patches), do you always put in maintenance mode first?

    1. If you have DRS this will force the host to drain VM's off (vMotions are automated).
    2. If you have vSAN this will make sure you are not about to offline the last good copy of data.
    3. It's an automated step in how VUM works...
    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: Why I Feel KVM Is the Easiest HyperVisor to Learn the Basics On

    @scottalanmiller said in Why I Feel KVM Is the Easiest HyperVisor to Learn the Basics On:

    The vendors. Reducing the amount of legacy stuff you maintain reduces costs a lot. Maybe even by half in some cases. It is unbelievable how much legacy support costs companies.

    You get fewer support calls/bug fixes, but there's still plenty of CPD costs tied to security on older platforms that are still in the wild.

    The benefits of "Cloud first" is you can ship faster. I think we push features into VMC quarterly which is a hell of a lot faster than our old 18 month waterfall and Microsofts 3 year gap on major products. Cloud first CI/CT or CI/CD process reduces QA costs. Now I'd argue Microsoft Windows has screwed this up by thinking the insider program was a suitable replacement for writing tests (It's a huge dumpster fire right now).

    posted in IT Discussion