• RE: Vendor Neutral IT Strategist Conference

    @scottalanmiller said in Vendor Neutral IT Strategist Conference:

    @Kelly said in Vendor Neutral IT Strategist Conference:

    @scottalanmiller said in Vendor Neutral IT Strategist Conference:

    @Kelly said in Vendor Neutral IT Strategist Conference:

    It sounds like you liked what Gartner's analysts had to say.

    No, he likes IDC, not Gartner.

    Thanks for clearing that up. It makes more sense now.

    I've not worked with IDC but have no knowledge of them working like Gartner does. And it is hard to hide because if you have any vendor side exposure, that Gartner reaches out to extort vendors is common knowledge as they do it to everyone. Same kind of thing that Dunn & Bradstreet do. Give us money, or we'll report bad things about you.

    The biggest issues with Gartner I have is how they arbitrarily define what a market is. They will ignore the #1 vendor in a space by making an artificial distinction (HCI must be an appliance and not software, All Flash arrays must be an array that isn't just sold with only flash, but has a magic SKU that prevents you from installing non-flash drives) etc.

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: SMB vs Enterprise

    @scottalanmiller The enterprise is way more diverse.

    I don't know Scott, I think being in the enterprise means everyone is just a guy who is an expert at 1 skill or app and would be helpless if dropped in a SMB. It's SOOO NARROW and soooo focused!

    Lets look at the life of a dedicated "VDI architect in the enterprise and at how "Narrow" his job is.

    1. Profile virtualization and layering solutions.
    2. Storage (block for image management, and NAS for profiles or app layers)
    3. WAN optimization. Nothing breaks ICX, or PCoIP like an incorrectly applied DSCP TAG!
    4. TFTP/DHCP as you need to make sure those Zero clients pull down their image!
    5. Syslog, and some sort of log analytics platform (LogInsight, Splunk etc) as you'll be needing this to troubleshoot your platform.
    6. A hypervisor (and generally to a bizarre level as you'll be invoking features that the server guys don't use, and you'll be hitting the corner cases of scale for things like VMFS when running 200 desktops on a host, or vGPU pass thru).
    7. Applications. To deploy non-persistent VDI you'll need to know how to use visualized registries, application packaging (ThinApp, App-V, AppVolumes) and dark corners of the registry sometimes.
    8. Customer service! because if you don't know how people are using stuff and be talking to the users problems will brew...
    9. How to build training guides as you need to build training materials for your operate trainers to push out.
    10. Need to be familiar possible with MDM solutions to cover corner cases where VDI doesn't work as well as how to automate thi
    11. Networking. Proper VDI clusters tons of VLAN's and can often invoke some more obscure things like PVLAN's and DMZ's.
    12. Security. Get ready to learn NSX microsegmentation and automation. You'll need to learn vRNI or some kind of netflow analyzer to figure out what your ACL's need to look like. Also get ready to learn F5 or NetScaler to do your load balancing and edge inspection. Even if your not the guy managing the firewall rules expect to have to learn it anyways for when your edge security team forgets to open UDP for PCoIP, you'll need to know how to test and verify that the ports are open.
    13. DNS. Because NOTHING will work without this. Bonus points for learning GSLB deployments with this so you can do automated VDI failover to the DR site.
    14. Antivirus. Since normal regular agent based deployments will break a host, get ready to learn hypervisor based inspection tools and deployments.

    Now it's true that some of these would be handled by other teams, but if you don't know how to explain your ask of those teams (or don't have 100% Competent people in those teams) get ready for your VDI deployment to get stuck for 6 months in ITIL change control hell.

    BTW, I'm only joking. In some shops the VDI guys can often wear other hats too.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: SMB vs Enterprise

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Dashrender said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @coliver said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @IRJ said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @IRJ said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Dashrender said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @IRJ

    @IRJ said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @IRJ said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    @Jimmy9008 said in SMB vs Enterprise:

    I'm a generalist too; I don't think that puts me at a disadvantage compared to specialists. Where many specialists would get caught up on a project, I have a range of experience which will get me past that problem.

    That is a key point. In enterprise, you take a very small amount of responsibility for specific functions vs doing everything across the board. It's both good and bad, but at the end of the day you'll learn more if you have to do everything. Although you may not master a specific area.

    Do you have an example of a specialist role? I'd like to see how they compare to a generalist role...

    There are so many examples. Let's just take a look at a windows server admin. There is a team for handling group policy, several builds, server patching, server OS troubleshooting, application support for specific applications (these are the guys troubleshooting with the vendors), package deployment, and more.

    You probably do alot more than sever admin in SMB. You're evaluating products, talking vendors, deploying actual physical hardware like racks and servers, configuring network equipment, and many more roles that aren't windows admin related.

    I see what you mean, but never assumed that to be specialist.

    What did you assume them to be?

    Yeah, I am not sure what you were expecting? I am just using a very broad role (windows admin) as an example of how many sub specialist roles you might see in enterprise. I am pretty sure I missed some

    Me neither, hence asking :P

    Maybe i'm not a generalist, but just assumed I am. GPOs, Patching, Server Deployments etc, I do all of them... so am I a specialist!? lol

    No. A Specialist does 1 or maybe 2 of those roles.

    But why? They are easy roles. It is not special at all to be good at 1 or 2 of them. They are easy. I'd guess boring if all you do all day is any particular 1 or 2 of them. Specialist feels like the wrong word.

    Yes, you do 1 or 2 of those things, but they are not difficult or special things. You are just solely dedicated to one of them...

    A shelve stacker at a supermarket only stacks shelves all day... they are not a specialist. If you just do GPO all day, why are you a specialist...

    Because you're specializing in GPO? Literally the definition of the word specialist. GPO is a massive beast with so many options and a vast amount of functionality that SMBs rarely touch even a fraction of it. The same goes for AD, patching, servers, etc... etc...

    I see. I thought when applied to jobs it had more meaning. So, I could leave and just focus on only one thing, something easy... like say, installing and restoring from Veeam Endpoint Free. Then I could call myself a specialist...?

    I find it odd how you consider these things to be easy. as coliver said - GPO has thousands of options. When dealing with 10's of thousands of machines, having to control a ton of aspects of a machine, GPOs can be daunting.

    The same can be said for dealing with backups. There are tons of options and things to be concerned about - did the backup actually grab a usable copy of the database? did logs get pruned correctly? do restores work as expected, and on and on.

    Yes, agree somewhat - but I don't consider them to be extremely difficult. Everything has things to be concerned about. The questions on the backup for example, yes - concerns, no - not difficult.

    You could have guys in operations that are 100% focused on Veeam or SRM.

    Testing of backups, verification of replica's, orchestrating DR fail-overs in a multi-tenant environment. That said even in large enterprises it's rare that you have anyone 100% focused on something this granular as installing an agent. The reality is you get a team who's focused on say storage and DR, and you outsource or pay for automation tools to avoid having anyone deploy an agent manually. This raises a good point.

    A LOT of SMB skills on the lower end become useless in a large enterprise because those roles are outsourced, or automated.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: SMB vs Enterprise

    @scottalanmiller We have business units (mine is ~500 people) that are smaller silo's but there's a lot of stuff that we don't have to deal with. We still consume core IT services (Email, IaaS, HR, ERP, VDI) and only really have "islands" of infrastructure for our R&D teams.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: SMB vs Enterprise

    @scottalanmiller My Paternity benefits are 15 weeks paid. No SMB could afford to offer that.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: SMB vs Enterprise

    @scottalanmiller You pay them what the value is of the guy who swaps toner in the printer, because WTF would you pay someone 140K who swaps out toner....

    Pay tends to trend down based on the lowest level skill things you do.

    posted in IT Careers
  • RE: Managing Hyper-V

    @stacksofplates said in Managing Hyper-V:

    @John-Nicholson said in Managing Hyper-V:

    @scottalanmiller said in Managing Hyper-V:

    ecosystem

    Also dropping Nano from being a supported path sucks for people who were hoping for it to be a true small secure embedded install (Core requires a 32GB DISK!)

    Holy crap. I didn't realize it was that big.

    Hyper-V's dependency on a DOM0 style Windows VM in the IO path means it's impossible to shrink the install that small. Xen isn't quite as bad (You can build a damn small DOM0) KVM is next in size (You can shrink it quite a bit) and then ESXi being the smallest (few hundred MB is all the VMkernel takes up with the rest being log, crash dumps, and VMTools that technically you can redirect).

    This is why a Hyper-V environment should require monthly patching while a shrunk and reasonably hardened KVM or ESXi environment can easily go quarterly or farther to maintain compliance requirements.

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: Managing Hyper-V

    @Tim_G that you get triple redundant, or more, secure web remote management plus no open port remote assistance all automatic and out of the box and that almost no one else offers that

    No open port remote assistance is a commodity (I can throw a rock and hit a vendor who does this). If your talking phone home support The top 3-4 HCI appliance vendors fit the bill here.

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: Managing Hyper-V

    @scottalanmiller said in Managing Hyper-V:

    @dbeato said in Managing Hyper-V:

    @scottalanmiller You need a Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 computer, and like I said on my post before you can go to the c$ of that HyperV enter the username and password and then connect using the Hyperv console.

    Okay, having him try that. What about if you are not on a LAN and not willing to expose SMB over the WAN?

    Wouldn't you never put a hypervisor on the public internet directly on any port?

    posted in IT Discussion
  • RE: Managing Hyper-V

    @scottalanmiller said in Managing Hyper-V:

    ecosystem

    Also dropping Nano from being a supported path sucks for people who were hoping for it to be a true small secure embedded install (Core requires a 32GB DISK!)

    posted in IT Discussion

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