Flash/SSD caching: what's your take?



  • What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?



  • @shalooshalini said:

    What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?

    I can't think of the last time I didn't use some sort of flash cache or another. It allows for much greater bang for the buck when it comes to storage performance.



  • @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?

    I can't think of the last time I didn't use some sort of flash cache or another. It allows for much greater bang for the buck when it comes to storage performance.

    What SSD caching solution did you use and for which application/OS?



  • @shalooshalini CacheCade and VSAN primarily these days.



  • @shalooshalini said:

    @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?

    I can't think of the last time I didn't use some sort of flash cache or another. It allows for much greater bang for the buck when it comes to storage performance.

    What SSD caching solution did you use and for which application/OS?

    Typically a flash-based write cache on the host's SAS controller or VMware vSAN. The only bare-metal OS I run in a server environment is ESXi.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @shalooshalini CacheCade and VSAN primarily these days.

    Thanks. So what kind of applications really benefit from your CacheCade deployment - are those primarily read intensive applications, say web servers or mostly VDI use case?



  • @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?

    I can't think of the last time I didn't use some sort of flash cache or another. It allows for much greater bang for the buck when it comes to storage performance.

    What SSD caching solution did you use and for which application/OS?

    Typically a flash-based write cache on the host's SAS controller or VMware vSAN. The only bare-metal OS I run in a server environment is ESXi.

    Great, thanks. What are some of the typical applications that benefit from write-caching in your environment?



  • @shalooshalini said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @shalooshalini CacheCade and VSAN primarily these days.

    Thanks. So what kind of applications really benefit from your CacheCade deployment - are those primarily read intensive applications, say web servers or mostly VDI use case?

    File serving is the big one for me, and vSphere virtualization.



  • @shalooshalini said:

    @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    @alexntg said:

    @shalooshalini said:

    What are your experiences with IO bottlenecks? Have you considered addressing those cost effectively via Flash based or Solid State Drive (SSD) based caching software?

    I can't think of the last time I didn't use some sort of flash cache or another. It allows for much greater bang for the buck when it comes to storage performance.

    What SSD caching solution did you use and for which application/OS?

    Typically a flash-based write cache on the host's SAS controller or VMware vSAN. The only bare-metal OS I run in a server environment is ESXi.

    Great, thanks. What are some of the typical applications that benefit from write-caching in your environment?

    In my environment, or my clients' environments? My environment's on AWS, so I'm not aware of the back-end hardware. My clients' environments are fully virtualized, so everything, really.



  • Yup. Both internal and clients are basically completely virtual and generally on VMware.


Log in to reply